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-   -   Coming back from a "failed" maintenance back to dieting (http://forums.lylemcdonald.com//showthread.php?t=5673)

fluteangel 12-12-2009 11:16 AM

Coming back from a "failed" maintenance back to dieting
 
So I was making great progress with Flexible Dieting and then I went to PSMF to speed things up a bit. Dropped from Cat 2 to Cat 1 and then ended it on Thanksgiving - trying to keep it low fat - doing a refeed for two days. I tried to keep things as low fat as possible, but I didn't have macros for everything I ate, so I guessed.

I went to maintenance for 10 days and I wanted to do it the non-counting method that Lyle talks about, and it kinda backfired on me. I ate too much and my weight shot up 9 lbs. I did what I shoudn't have, and ate a ton of junk, but I've learned my lesson.

So, now I"m back to dieting and I'm wondering how to figure out my dieting category and thus be able to figure out when to have refeeds. This morning I weighed in at 127, Thanksgiving day I was 121 (two weeks ago) and Tanita scale still says 26% first thing in the morning (way less at night). I KNOW Tanita is horribly unreliant, but I don't have a good other method. Should I base my category on where I left off as Cat 1, or say I'm Cat 2 now?

I'm taking a whole week with no cheats to re-set my taste buds away from sugar and then I think I'm supposed to do a refeed - once again, I know I should probably start at the bottom of the carb range, but I'm not sure which category in which to put myself.

I would say it's all water weight, but due to the amount of fat I consumed, I'm sure there is some real fat regain in there somewhere.

lylemcd 12-12-2009 11:32 AM

Dieting should be based on where you are now. Not where you were, where you want to be, or where you think you should be.

nadfubach 12-13-2009 04:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fluteangel (Post 71134)
I ate too much and my weight shot up 9 lbs. I did what I shoudn't have, and ate a ton of junk, but I've learned my lesson.

From the various posts you've made on various forums, you seem to engage in starve/binge cycles - diet, over eat, diet to compensate, overeat again, diet again. over eat and look for ways to compensate through exercise.

As someone who used to do this ALOT myself, I'd like to recommend that you NOT return to dieting until you can succeed at maintaining without over eating.

As I eventually came to realize, unless you are prepping for a contest, taking a few extra weeks to come to terms with eating properly is going to be more beneficial in the long run than returning to dieting without being able to manage maintenance.

PlankIt 12-13-2009 05:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nadfubach (Post 71252)
From the various posts you've made on various forums, you seem to engage in starve/binge cycles - diet, over eat, diet to compensate, overeat again, diet again. over eat and look for ways to compensate through exercise.

x2

Quote:


As I eventually came to realize, unless you are prepping for a contest, taking a few extra weeks to come to terms with eating properly is going to be more beneficial in the long run than returning to dieting without being able to manage maintenance.
:rolleyes:

fluteangel 12-13-2009 11:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nadfubach (Post 71252)
From the various posts you've made on various forums, you seem to engage in starve/binge cycles - diet, over eat, diet to compensate, overeat again, diet again. over eat and look for ways to compensate through exercise.

As someone who used to do this ALOT myself, I'd like to recommend that you NOT return to dieting until you can succeed at maintaining without over eating.

As I eventually came to realize, unless you are prepping for a contest, taking a few extra weeks to come to terms with eating properly is going to be more beneficial in the long run than returning to dieting without being able to manage maintenance.

Quote:

Originally Posted by PlankIt (Post 71255)
x2

:rolleyes:

Yeah, it's horrible, I never had this problem until I did my first competition. My relationship with food changed then and I'm still trying to get it back to normal. Funny thing is, right before THanksgiving I was in a really REALLY good mindset, I actually did not want to end it on Thanksgiving, but there it was. Lyle's book helped a lot with changing that mindset. SO I'm definitely off to re-read it.

I'm not preparing for a contest right now, but want to soon, so in that regard, I'm trying to hurry up and get as lean as possible so I can do a specialization and THEN lean out, possibly for a contest and then maintain. I think that's why I'm putting so much pressure on myself, which I KNOW is silly. Just, when you've been dieting for most of the entire year, and only made progress in the last few months (long story), it's tough to step lightly off the dieting wagon, you know?

Thanks for your help and support!

PlankIt 12-14-2009 05:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fluteangel (Post 71277)

I'm not preparing for a contest right now, but want to soon, so in that regard, I'm trying to hurry up and get as lean as possible so I can do a specialization and THEN lean out, possibly for a contest and then maintain. I think that's why I'm putting so much pressure on myself, which I KNOW is silly. Just, when you've been dieting for most of the entire year, and only made progress in the last few months (long story), it's tough to step lightly off the dieting wagon, you know?

Thanks for your help and support!

I don't think this would be a good idea right now given your behaviors

Fitnesschicky 12-14-2009 09:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nadfubach (Post 71252)
From the various posts you've made on various forums, you seem to engage in starve/binge cycles - diet, over eat, diet to compensate, overeat again, diet again. over eat and look for ways to compensate through exercise.

As someone who used to do this ALOT myself, I'd like to recommend that you NOT return to dieting until you can succeed at maintaining without over eating.

As I eventually came to realize, unless you are prepping for a contest, taking a few extra weeks to come to terms with eating properly is going to be more beneficial in the long run than returning to dieting without being able to manage maintenance.

I completely agree with taking your time to let things settle and having a plan you can stick to for a good solid month. I would suggest not doing refeeds either initially. If you're at maintenance you won't need them, and they'll just be doing more psychological harm than good.

Fitnesschicky 12-14-2009 09:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fluteangel (Post 71277)
Yeah, it's horrible, I never had this problem until I did my first competition. My relationship with food changed then and I'm still trying to get it back to normal. Funny thing is, right before THanksgiving I was in a really REALLY good mindset, I actually did not want to end it on Thanksgiving, but there it was. Lyle's book helped a lot with changing that mindset. SO I'm definitely off to re-read it.

I'm not preparing for a contest right now, but want to soon, so in that regard, I'm trying to hurry up and get as lean as possible so I can do a specialization and THEN lean out, possibly for a contest and then maintain. I think that's why I'm putting so much pressure on myself, which I KNOW is silly. Just, when you've been dieting for most of the entire year, and only made progress in the last few months (long story), it's tough to step lightly off the dieting wagon, you know?

Thanks for your help and support!

Hunnie, I feel you on the "I want to hurry up and get as lean as possible so I can do a specialization." Sometimes the body has other plans though. I'd much rather go into my offseason in the 120's but instead, I'm 128-130. I would looveee to still be 110 lbs. My body had other plans. It said "okay you gained 30 lbs, I'm only letting you lose 12. Better luck next time." I think these little binges you're engaging in are only going to get worse the more pressure you put on yourself, and the harder you try to diet.

There is no rush for this, not when your health is involved, especially mental health. I never had a good grip on all this, even after my first 2 shows. I thought I did but I didn't. I didn't rebound horribly after my first season, but knew deep down that my relationship with food was always a little shaky. The longer my prep went on during my second season, I knew I was going to be in for one heck of a rebound. I binged on sweet potatoes the week of my show and threw them up. Nobody knows about that. Prolly why I looked "off." That just goes to show what contest dieting can do to a person, especially someone who struggles with control around food. I know in my heart I won't ever step onstage again until I can be 100% sure I won't engage in anymore detrimental behaviors to my body.

fluteangel 12-15-2009 10:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PlankIt (Post 71285)
I don't think this would be a good idea right now given your behaviors

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fitnesschicky (Post 71487)
I completely agree with taking your time to let things settle and having a plan you can stick to for a good solid month. I would suggest not doing refeeds either initially. If you're at maintenance you won't need them, and they'll just be doing more psychological harm than good.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fitnesschicky (Post 71489)
Hunnie, I feel you on the "I want to hurry up and get as lean as possible so I can do a specialization." Sometimes the body has other plans though. I'd much rather go into my offseason in the 120's but instead, I'm 128-130. I would looveee to still be 110 lbs. My body had other plans. It said "okay you gained 30 lbs, I'm only letting you lose 12. Better luck next time." I think these little binges you're engaging in are only going to get worse the more pressure you put on yourself, and the harder you try to diet.

There is no rush for this, not when your health is involved, especially mental health. I never had a good grip on all this, even after my first 2 shows. I thought I did but I didn't. I didn't rebound horribly after my first season, but knew deep down that my relationship with food was always a little shaky. The longer my prep went on during my second season, I knew I was going to be in for one heck of a rebound. I binged on sweet potatoes the week of my show and threw them up. Nobody knows about that. Prolly why I looked "off." That just goes to show what contest dieting can do to a person, especially someone who struggles with control around food. I know in my heart I won't ever step onstage again until I can be 100% sure I won't engage in anymore detrimental behaviors to my body.

You guys are right, there is no rush, the good thing is that every step is and has been a learning process. You know what's strange? I feel like I had a better handle on eating healthy, sticking to my diet and overall, being in a better mental place when I was dieting flexibly and incorporating refeeds. I think it was the knowing that I could eat whatever I wanted, nothing was off limits, if I put it into my macros, or made it a cheat meal, cuz I had one cheat meal and one refeed each week and I kept losing, because knowing that freedom was there and then knowing that refeed was right around the corner kept me sticking to my plan.

I don't want to do the binge/regret cycle anymore. I want that healthy relationship but it's a fine line, you know? There's comfort in sticking to your numbers, but what about the rest of your life? I really don't want to count the rest of my lifeand I'm wondering how to transition from counting to non-counting when it comes to maintenance.

I agree with all of you and thank you for your help and support. I have been doing well with coming back to my initial plan, staying on it and being truly accountable to myself and my experiment is that it's been 7 days and tomorrow I'm going to try a refeed. I haven't felt like the refeeds set off a binge cycle with me, but rather helped.

Honestly, I'm too afraid to try to maintain till after Christmas because I'm afraid I migth eat too much AT Christmas, when there's less of a chance I'll do that if I'm dieting....uh, does that make sense?

Morgan 12-15-2009 11:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fluteangel (Post 71677)
Honestly, I'm too afraid to try to maintain till after Christmas because I'm afraid I migth eat too much AT Christmas, when there's less of a chance I'll do that if I'm dieting....uh, does that make sense?

I still don't think your getting it :(, have you tried seeing a psychotherapist. Really? Your thoughts and behaviors are very ED'd and well, dieting IMO is not what you need rather you need to work on your other issues.


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