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  #1  
Unread 12-17-2015, 04:06 AM
Losername Losername is offline
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Default Age and training experience differences

I'm curious if there's a significant difference between ages and experience levels. I'll be honest and first thing that pops into my head are probably crazy and improbable Hollywood stunts which I'm not sure how good they, so any re-calibration is appreciated.

Is there much difference between a 20-year old man and a 30-year old man in performance, assuming roughly similar training?

Is there a difference between someone who's been training from a young age, to someone who has a few years of training but they started at a later age? (let's say 20)

As for what "training" actually is, it can be climbing, running, lifting weights, your favorite type of cardio. I have a feeling too much stuff falls inside here and that's why I wanted age to be the only major difference.

Thanks a lot!
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Unread 12-17-2015, 05:52 AM
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hugsaredrugs hugsaredrugs is offline
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Younger + More training experience will do better than older with less for sure. A young guy with less training experience can probably even outlift an old guy who's trained longer just because he's old (but it depends). Testosterone peaks in your early 20s and it's thought that's when males peak in their strength/power output (as for other sports I don't know).

A kid who trains earlier is going to be a lot better for several reasons, e.g in olympic weightlifting a young kid will have already gotten a lot of technique out of the way at a young age, made some adaptation, and gained knowledge of the sport and how to train, making him more succesfull than someome who stated entering his 20s.

It's kind of obvious/untuitive, I think.
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Unread 12-17-2015, 06:11 AM
beatle beatle is offline
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Enduros peak in their late 20s typically, assuming they started training in their ~late teens.

VO2max falls off after that. I find, as a late 30s competitive cyclist, I can still go as hard as ever in a race, but multiple days in row are no longer possible. I need more rest and I focus on a bit less volume but more frequent intesity.
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Unread 12-17-2015, 09:08 AM
lylemcdonald lylemcdonald is offline
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The same goes for strength and power with power falling off faster than endurance. Athletes in this sports typically peak mid 20's and then it's a downward. slide.
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Unread 12-18-2015, 03:08 PM
stoomc stoomc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lylemcdonald View Post
The same goes for strength and power with power falling off faster than endurance. Athletes in this sports typically peak mid 20's and then it's a downward. slide.
I was reading up on muscular potential on the main site, I see the figure is around 2lb per month and was wondering what the potential muscle gain per month would be for a 40-50 year old man? Just basically wondering how much of a difference there was roughly.
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Unread 12-19-2015, 04:29 AM
Txomin Txomin is offline
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The older you get, the slower you recover (or adapt). That factor alone screws it all up.
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Unread 12-21-2015, 10:35 AM
lylemcdonald lylemcdonald is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stoomc View Post
I was reading up on muscular potential on the main site, I see the figure is around 2lb per month and was wondering what the potential muscle gain per month would be for a 40-50 year old man? Just basically wondering how much of a difference there was roughly.
Smaller although testosterone doesn't really start to fall off until after that.
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  #8  
Unread 12-21-2015, 11:33 AM
stoomc stoomc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lylemcdonald View Post
Smaller although testosterone doesn't really start to fall off until after that.
OK good to know.
My father in law has started lifiting and he is 50+.
I wonder if there is an age that muscle couldn't be built at all... But thought that may be a silly this to think. I could understand it being slower, but not at all?
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Unread 12-21-2015, 01:50 PM
Txomin Txomin is offline
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I could be mistaken but I remember reading a study a couple of years back on octogenarians and they did develop muscle albeit small gains.
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Unread 01-04-2016, 07:59 AM
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clicker666 clicker666 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stoomc View Post
OK good to know.
My father in law has started lifiting and he is 50+.
I wonder if there is an age that muscle couldn't be built at all... But thought that may be a silly this to think. I could understand it being slower, but not at all?
I turn fifty this year. I started lifting back in Feb of 2009 (age 43) and have managed to go from:

Squats: 115 to 425 lbs.
Bench: 105 to 285 lbs.
Deadlifts: 135 to 445 lbs.
OHP: 75 to 215 lbs.

I'm still adding muscle and strength, but won't deny that it's a challenge as my P ratio is pitiful - I have to be careful with eating too much to chase the gains.

Recovery is slow, and I'm constantly having to take breaks to allow this or that to heal up. Advil is my friend.

Keeping things simple is key for me. I stick to those four movements, and only those. I don't have time for more, and adding a bunch of little accessory movements tends to end in injury.

Listening to your body is super important - he has to keep in mind that he can't simply pick a program off the shelf like Starting Strength and expect to run it like a college kid. (He might for a bit, but once the newbie gains start to wear off he'll realize this quickly).
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