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  #1  
Unread 01-28-2017, 01:12 PM
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BEATMEOUTTAME BEATMEOUTTAME is offline
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Default Fix your Anterior Pelvic Tilt!!!

LAlright, I'm willing to bet a lot of you are affected by Anterior Pelvic Tilt.

It absolutely wreaks havoc on my physical appearance, physical discomfort, and ability to train effectively.

If you aren't familiar with Anterior Pelvic Tilt perhaps Google a picture really quick. If you're a man it basically makes you look pregnant with your gut and butt both protruding.

It's mostly a result of sitting too much at desk jobs or as leisure and not getting enough physical exercise. Sitting around flexed at the hip all day is horrible for your posture.

You'll even notice if you lay down to read you will tend to flex your hip and sit with your knees drawn up, your heels crossed, or your pelvis rotated outward.

The basic tenants of APT are:
1) Weak Hamstrings / Hamstring frequently feel overstretched or "pulled"
2) Weak Glutes / Poor glute activation
3) Poor lower back flexibility, over engaged muscles that often feel tired or sore
4) Tight quads that are dominant in exercise and pull on the Hamstrings
5) Weak, unengaged abdominals/core. Most ab exercises/machines "dont feel right" as your hip flexors and lower back tend to come into play and override the abdominals going through exercise.

Squats and deadlifits don't seem to feel right because of these imbalances and can exacerbate the problem or cause injuries that set back your progress and motivation.

Most of the recommended exercises online seem too conservative and would take forever to make the type of progress you need to make to fix this issue.

The best exercises typically require more initial flexibility than you have and lead you to give up.


How you can test yourself for this problem.

1) stand against the wall. Is there a huge gap you can fit your hand between the walls and your lower back? This is a sign you have this issue.

2) Get into a plank position and hold it or start doing pushups if capablle. Is it difficult to keep your back flat? Do you start to sag with your lower back well before your abs get tired? This is another sign.

3) Look at yourself in the mirror and compare yourself to images of anterior pelvic tilt online. It's a quite distinctive appearance.



Now let's talk about ways to fix this. I'm going to share some things that have helped me a TON. Hopefully others have suggestions that can help as well.

1) Foam rolling. This is a good way to start your progress.

2) Glute bridges. Yeah it looks dumb but it's an absolute necessity IMO.

3) Stability Ball Hamstring Curl. Hands down the best thing I've done to date. Instant pain rellief and flexibility increases.

4) Yoga pose - Virasana. All yoga helps a ton. Try to learn a few new poses each week and implement them. I couldn't even begin to get into this position initially and now I can hold it a long time. Unbelievable how much this helps.

5) Hit the quad machines at the gym. Reduce the weight and do 3 sets of 15 reps. Concentrate on taking it through the entire range of motion. You don't really want to build strength in quads to fix this problem they are already over developed compared to your hamstrings. So you are focused on improving their fllexibility. Stretching won't make as much progress as light resistance training will.

6) Couch Stretch. Work your way up to this stretch and you will start making huge leaps in progress

7) Warrior pose. (Yoga) A must do.

8) Bretzel. (Google this it's great)

9) Walk for distance. Walk each day and squeeze your Glutes on each step. This will lead teach them to reengage. Focus on your posture.

10) Stop sitting so much at work, home, etc. ("Desk bound- Standing up in a sitting down World") was a quick, cheap book I read on Kindle that helped me wrap my head around everything. Not a plug, it's a great book. Complete with stretch recommendations and changes you can make to your daily life (a must read if you work long hours at a desk in my opinion)


Bottom line to make real progress do this stuff DAILY. The physical pain relief and visual appearance improvements are some of the most worthwhile exercise results I've ever experienced.

The improvements are rapid as long as you commit to holding the poses/stretches a little deeper and longer each day.

I may post a before/after shot today later


LASTLY. DO THE HIP FLEXOR STRETCH DAILY. PERIOD. Focus intently on adding time, depth, and number of sets/reps. Track your progress.



Ok other people's experience, go!
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Last edited by BEATMEOUTTAME : 01-28-2017 at 01:45 PM. Reason: A
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  #2  
Unread 01-28-2017, 01:26 PM
stallion009 stallion009 is offline
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I've been looking into this broader topic (mobility training) as of late and have been working on my imperfections. I don't have the pelvic tilt, but I have other issues - such as tight hip mobility and tight ankle mobility - which reduces the amount of range I can push my knees out on a squat, which then causes my ankles to move directly off the base of my feet - causing my feet to collapse inward a bit.

It's an interesting thing to investigate because even if you have issues (that you're completely unaware of) you can still do the big movements. Your body will get it done by another means, but eventually it will catch up to you.

I've been going through some of Kelly Starrett's stuff and it's really been helping. I've lightened the weight on my squat to focus on this more. Attention is on my knees and ankles - preventing myself from collapsing. It's improving and the movement is becoming easier.

Not to take away from the pelvic tilt advice. Just the broader subject is really worth investigating. Most people probably have something they need to improve.
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  #3  
Unread 01-28-2017, 01:53 PM
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BEATMEOUTTAME BEATMEOUTTAME is offline
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You raise a good point.

I tried Starting Strength a number of times as a 30+ yo male with severe APT.

I really strived for perfect form but my body just wouldn't allow me to complete the exercises correctly due to strength imbalances and fllexibility issues

Sure I'd have no problem squatting 95 pounds because my body would compensate. But by the time I'd get to the more intermediate weights I'd start having knee pain, lower back pain, tendon soreness, etc.

And my incremental strength progress would come to a near halt as some of my major muscle groups were not engaging to help with the movements. All the sudden I was doing quarter squats and using my biceps to deadlifit like a total noob


I'd venture to say for the average person googling "rapid fat loss" And willing to go to these extreme lengths to change their body composition they have some sort of major flexibility Or mobility issue that needs to be addressed before they start squatting/deadlifting serious weight.
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My Wild Ride to A great body in my 30s.

http://forums.lylemcdonald.com/showthread.php?t=23215

Thank you Lyle. This website is a game changer once you understand the mechanisms behind fat loss/muscle gain.

Spun my wheels for years prior to finding this site.
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  #4  
Unread 01-28-2017, 01:55 PM
lylemcdonald lylemcdonald is online now
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Read Cressey's Neanderthal No More series.
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  #5  
Unread 01-28-2017, 03:14 PM
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BEATMEOUTTAME BEATMEOUTTAME is offline
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Wow. That was about as thorough as it gets. I've got the time and motivation to try most of those exercises so I'm going to give it a go this week since my gym access this week is limited to planet fitness where i can't do compound movements anyway.

There is really a lot to learn on this topic so if it's new to you and you need a really basic summary to get you going just use this:

1) Tight, short quads and lower back muscles to you want to STRETCH/Lengthen these muscle groups not STRENGTHEN/Shorten them further.

2) Weak and elongated hamstrings/Glutes and abs soon you want to STRENGTHEN/SHORTEN these muscle groups not STRETCH/Lengthen them further.


Now you can increase flexibility much faster and safer than you can strengthen muscles that aren't being actively recruited properly IMO (perhaps I'm wrong on this?)

So I just focused on improving the flexibility of my quads/lower back first. And did movements that activated my Glutes/hamstrings lIke walking, glute bridges, etc before I started any major strength training on these muscle groups. I'm at the point where I think the series of recommended weight bearing exercises should be quite helpful as the exercises I listed above are More of a warm-up these days
__________________
My Wild Ride to A great body in my 30s.

http://forums.lylemcdonald.com/showthread.php?t=23215

Thank you Lyle. This website is a game changer once you understand the mechanisms behind fat loss/muscle gain.

Spun my wheels for years prior to finding this site.

Last edited by BEATMEOUTTAME : 01-28-2017 at 03:16 PM. Reason: A
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  #6  
Unread 01-29-2017, 08:34 AM
holly70 holly70 is offline
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If you are interested in mobility and injury prevention then you might enjoy poking around another site. The author is a runner, but bodies are bodies and he covers a bit of strength training/conditioning too.

This article has stuff about calf stretches mostly:

http://sock-doc.com/no-stretching-calves-for-runners/

Quote:
Oh, you caught me stretching my calves. This wall stretch that a lot of people do, a lot of runners like to do to warm up, is actually a pretty silly stretch. There’s lots of better ways that you can actually create normal flexibility and stability in your lower leg without having to actually stretch a muscle, to only weaken it and actually hinder performance, and even decrease injury recovery time.
Bonus points for snarky sense of humor:

Quote:
Some runners are even taught to perform this and many other silly stretches after they run to “retain the flexibility” which they hopefully gained during the run. Are you kidding me? So if you hold a stretch for 8-20+ seconds then all of a sudden your body magically locks in the increased flexibility you got from your run. This is assuming you’re running efficiently in the first place, (which most people are not doing), and are actually creating some increased and healthy range of motion. It’s also assuming that you ran in the Land of Magic where post-exercise stretching for some short predetermined time now all of a suddenly prolongs gains just by adding in this little extra movement gimmick.
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Unread 01-30-2017, 03:59 AM
Gssuck Gssuck is offline
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This is a great thread!

How does one stretch the low back with a recovering disc bulge?
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  #8  
Unread 02-03-2017, 11:57 AM
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davidjr74 davidjr74 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gssuck View Post
This is a great thread!

How does one stretch the low back with a recovering disc bulge?
When I was recovering from my herniated disc (though I ultimately ended up getting surgery for bad sciatica...) a while back my physical therapist had me doing "McKenzie Press-ups."

Seemed to provide some relief.
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  #9  
Unread 02-05-2017, 09:36 AM
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BEATMEOUTTAME BEATMEOUTTAME is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gssuck View Post
This is a great thread!

How does one stretch the low back with a recovering disc bulge?
I'm not qualified to answer the disc bulge question. I'll just tell you what I do to stretch my lower back and perhaps you can run all these by a health professional before trying them.


1) Yoga poses. Look up yoga lower back and there are tons of good ones. The best part about yoga is 1) immediate pain relief and 2) extremely rapid initial improvement

2) Another good purchase is a foam roller. Remember the lower back pain is in large part because it's being recruited too hard by an overactive psoas muscles. Anything you can do to get the knots out of your psoas and lengthen that muscle group and improve overall quad flexibility is a huge win.

3) A yoga block is extremely helpful and cheap. Look up how to place under your sacrum and do this for 2-3 min every morning. It Decompresses your spinal loading.

4) Also, I really recommend that "desk bound -standing up in a sitting down world" book. The first ~3-4 chapters are dedicated to making small changes in your daily routine (how you sit, how long you sit, how you sleep, how you walk etc) that will lead to big changes. If you exercise an hour a day but do everything else wrong 23 hours a day you simply won't make much progress.

5) Lastly, if you have lower back pain stop thinking about it as a lower back issue. When you have pain in one area a lot of times it is just the messenger that you have an imbalance elsewhere. Typically slightly above or below the area where you feel pain. In this case that is your abs, glutes, hamstrings, and quads. If your quads are pulling one direction and your hamstrings aren't fighting back hard enough that's a big problem. If your glute muscles aren't doing their share to support your bodyweight and propel you forward when you are walking that's a huge problem. If your lower back isn't being offset by strong core abdominal strength that's a huge problem. If you have a giant belly your lower back Is playing tug of war with that's a huge problem. All of these are things that can be corrected with minimal disc bulge aggravation


Check these for sure with a medical professional as they are the ones id feel least safe recommending to someone with disc issues. Back hyper extensions. Typically I'd grab a 45 lb plate and do a lot of reps as a lifting regimen. But to fix APT you do not want to strengthen your already over developed lower back. So I just do it with no added weignt. I'll do several sets of 15, with my arms fully extended, maximum squeeze/hold at the top, really concentrating on range of motion. I'm not sure this is a great idea for you though.
__________________
My Wild Ride to A great body in my 30s.

http://forums.lylemcdonald.com/showthread.php?t=23215

Thank you Lyle. This website is a game changer once you understand the mechanisms behind fat loss/muscle gain.

Spun my wheels for years prior to finding this site.

Last edited by BEATMEOUTTAME : 02-05-2017 at 09:48 AM. Reason: A
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  #10  
Unread 02-05-2017, 09:47 AM
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BEATMEOUTTAME BEATMEOUTTAME is offline
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Default Tip of the day!

Here is my tip of the day.

How do you sit at your work desk? Or in church? Meetings? Dinner? Watching TV?

Go ahead sit down wherever you sit the most and take note of your positioning.


Are you sitting ON your hamstrings? Like are they being smashed into the seat by the rest of your body weight? When you stand up are they kinda numb or tingly feeling?

If you are, this is one of the most easily correctable gigantic mistakes you are making that is ruining your life.

QUIT SITTING ON YOUR HAMSTRINGS YOU ARE SMASHING THEM YOU IDIOT. (This is what I tell myself when I find myself sitting on my hamstrings)

Scoot forward, sit up straighter, and allow your hamstrings some relief so they can do their job the rest of the day.

Google sitting on your hamstrings to understand all the long term damage you are doing. Sit on your butt. It has built in cushioning for a reason
__________________
My Wild Ride to A great body in my 30s.

http://forums.lylemcdonald.com/showthread.php?t=23215

Thank you Lyle. This website is a game changer once you understand the mechanisms behind fat loss/muscle gain.

Spun my wheels for years prior to finding this site.
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