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  #1  
Unread 05-12-2009, 12:01 PM
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Default A Primer on Dietary Fats

Part 1 on the main site
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Unread 05-13-2009, 12:08 PM
Weib Weib is offline
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Awesome interview at TTT.
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Unread 05-15-2009, 01:10 PM
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Part 2 on the main site
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Unread 05-15-2009, 06:53 PM
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This caught my attention: "I should mention that the changes that typically occur in blood cholesterol levels with changing saturated fat intake tend to occur in both the ‘good’ and ‘bad’ cholesterol fractions. That is, when saturated fat is reduced, both good and bad cholesterol typically goes down and vice versa."

I am someone who has been on cholesterol medication for years. I've been told it's genetic. The statins they've put me on have been able to lower the LDL's, but nothing has been able to raise my HDL. Crestor helped a bit, but the side effects were too painful.

Based on what you wrote above would it make sense to try to increase my saturated fat intake in hopes of raising my HDL, while continuing to take the statin to keep LDL down?
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Unread 05-15-2009, 06:58 PM
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I don't know enough about exactly what statins do to answer that with anything but ignorance. David Cohen might have some better insight.
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Unread 08-25-2009, 12:42 PM
groy groy is offline
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Is it okay to cook with extra virgin olive oil when sauteeing vegetables and meat? Or does this amount of heat damage its composition?
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Unread 08-25-2009, 01:00 PM
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cykomiko will be the one to give a good answer to this but I believe the heat point on olive oil is pretty high. I still think my general tendency would be to cook with a more stable fat (sat fat) and just throw the olive oil on top.
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Unread 08-25-2009, 01:10 PM
Sickbean Sickbean is offline
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This has nothing to do with nutrition, but olive oil has a very low smoking point so you can't really get it hot enough to cook properly.

I do what Lyle said - I cook with Groundnut (which is virtually flavourless and has a very high smoking point), and add extra virgin in just before serving if the dish calls for it.
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Unread 08-25-2009, 01:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by groy View Post
Is it okay to cook with extra virgin olive oil when sauteeing vegetables and meat? Or does this amount of heat damage its composition?
Extra virgin is generally used for low heat cooking and to dress foods. If you want to cook at medium to high heats, I would go with regular olive oil as the smoke point is much higher.
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Unread 08-25-2009, 01:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sickbean View Post
This has nothing to do with nutrition, but olive oil has a very low smoking point so you can't really get it hot enough to cook properly.

I do what Lyle said - I cook with Groundnut (which is virtually flavourless and has a very high smoking point), and add extra virgin in just before serving if the dish calls for it.
As mentioned, this is only true of Extra Virgin. Regular olive oil has quite a high smoke point.
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