BodyRecomposition Support Forums  

Go Back   BodyRecomposition Support Forums > General information > Articles on the Main Site
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #111  
Unread 12-10-2009, 05:49 PM
doc doc is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 6
Default Maf

what do you think of MAF

http://www.enduranceuk.com/profiles/...phil-maffetone
Reply With Quote
  #112  
Unread 12-10-2009, 06:15 PM
doc doc is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 6
Default MAF cont...

http://www.befitlifestyle.com/docs/MAF_TEST_ARTICLE.pdf
Reply With Quote
  #113  
Unread 03-04-2010, 12:14 PM
James Stewart James Stewart is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 155
Default Lyle and lydiard

lyle, just discovered the Endurance articles. Thank you so much, as a once upon a time lydiard man I loved to go long and develop a 5 speed gear box, too many gurus focus on one side of the spectrum... HIIT or tabata for everyone all the time or Liss and the oft mistaken LSD.

Thank you for bringing balanced science back to the table with the pro and the con. Saved your articles to desktop for bedtime reading.

Brilliant guidance to follow, looking forward to developing a sweet spot in the coming months. This is exactly what was / is needed for a return to optimum training re my goals.

I am delighted.
Reply With Quote
  #114  
Unread 03-09-2010, 10:55 AM
runningart runningart is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 3
Default

One of the best "non runner" articles about running that I've read.

I'm a former high level distance runner turned lifter (formerly 2:32 marathon, 1:09:40 half-marathon, 15:43 5k, 4:27 HS mile).

Anyway...a quick search of pubmed shows lots of studies supporting the use of resistance training for competitive distance runners. One study showed an improvement in 3000m performance in elite level women runners. Many other studies show improvement in running economy. The problem in the high level runner community is this "all or nothing" approach. The amount of workload a high level runner can achieve is remarkable....but this approach needs to be turned on its head if a high level runner embarks on a strength training program.

Keep it simple. Use adequate rests for strength improvement...not just fatigue for the sake of fatigue. Consolidate training stresses (strength training on your intense running days as a secondary evening workout). In and out of the gym in 30 minutes or less.

Alan
Reply With Quote
  #115  
Unread 03-09-2010, 11:05 AM
lylemcd's Avatar
lylemcd lylemcd is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 22,641
Default

The problem is this: studies showing an improvement in economy aren't showing improvements in performance and it's the latter that is important. Who cares if economy goes up if they don't run faster.

At best the data set is mixed and I'd say more studies don't support weight training than do.

And by definition, any training that doesn't improve performance but does take time away from doing your sport is a negative.
Reply With Quote
  #116  
Unread 04-28-2010, 11:21 AM
dangerroadhumps's Avatar
dangerroadhumps dangerroadhumps is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 63
Default

For Tempo and sweet spot

The drawback of this training is that itís good bit harder

I think there should be an "a" there.
Reply With Quote
  #117  
Unread 05-01-2010, 02:09 PM
SMccoy SMccoy is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 63
Default

In terms of intensity for each method, Iím going to use heart rate although, itís really an imperfect method, itís far better to anchor intensity to some measured value such as lactate levels or functional threshold (either in terms of power or the heart rate achieved). For the values Iíve listed below, assume a functional threshold heart rate of 175 beats per minute or so.

Does this mean it's best to shoot for a particular power level while cycling regardless of the perceived effort? And then when it gets easier it means your aerobic capacity has improved.
Reply With Quote
  #118  
Unread 05-01-2010, 03:57 PM
lylemcd's Avatar
lylemcd lylemcd is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 22,641
Default

Yes and yes. That's been the big change with the advent of power meters in teh cycling community, the realization that HR is a dependent variable, not the stimulus.

So on any given day you might hold 200w at a variety of heart rates depending on fatigue, hydration, etc. The wattage is what's important, the rest are not.

And your second question is how I tend to gauge adjustments in intensity without doing formal testing. A lot of that is because I did all of my cycling workouts under controlled conditions, on a bike trainer, indoors, at the same time of the week/day.

If under an identical set of conditions, my HR at a given wattage had changed, I knew that my aerobic potential had gone up. for me, 1 beat per minute was worth about 2 watts. So if my HR at a given wattage fell 5 beats per minute (and note that I NEVER used a single workout to determine this), I'd know to adjust my calculator to set the workload for that workout at 10 watts higher.
Reply With Quote
  #119  
Unread 05-01-2010, 03:59 PM
SMccoy SMccoy is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 63
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lylemcd View Post
Yes and yes. That's been the big change with the advent of power meters in teh cycling community, the realization that HR is a dependent variable, not the stimulus.

So on any given day you might hold 200w at a variety of heart rates depending on fatigue, hydration, etc. The wattage is what's important, the rest are not.

And your second question is how I tend to gauge adjustments in intensity without doing formal testing. A lot of that is because I did all of my cycling workouts under controlled conditions, on a bike trainer, indoors, at the same time of the week/day.

If under an identical set of conditions, my HR at a given wattage had changed, I knew that my aerobic potential had gone up. for me, 1 beat per minute was worth about 2 watts. So if my HR at a given wattage fell 5 beats per minute (and note that I NEVER used a single workout to determine this), I'd know to adjust my calculator to set the workload for that workout at 10 watts higher.
Great explanation thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #120  
Unread 05-02-2010, 08:11 AM
lylemcd's Avatar
lylemcd lylemcd is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 22,641
Default

I'd also mention that I wasn't doing micromanagement of wattages based on a couple of beats difference in a workout. I'd look at average heart rates and a change from 145 for an hour to 144 or 143 wasn't worth adjusting anything.

Not only is it noise at that level, the difference in training effect for the adjustment isn't relevant. Doing tempo at 220 vs. 224w just isn't worth worrying about. My powermeter wasn't that adjustable anyhow.

But if I consistently saw like 5 beats less at a given workload over the span of several workouts (again, comparing like workouts to like workouts), I'd adjust the numbers in my spreadsheet and adjust training levels. 10 watts would be worth making the adjustment IMO.

So a 220w average workout would go to 230w if I had seen that 5 beat drop for 2-3 workouts consistently and I'd update the spreadsheet to reflect the new theoretical functional threshold power.

I do teh same thing now in my running/EFX workouts for skating. If at a given HR, my average HR is hugely different, I'll bump up the speed/level to adjust HR to the next level. But I have to be looking at consistent workouts. So I'll usually use my Saturdy workout as a metric, it's after my day off, usually done under identical conditions. If I run significantly lower HR at a given pace (and mind you this assumes teh treadmills are all identical, it wolud be ideal if I always used the same one but that isn't always possible), I'll adjust it upwards to get HR back to my training zone.

But I couldn't look at HR on say a Wed workout (when I have accumulated fatigue from the previous 4 days) and compare it to a Saturday workout in terms of anything. You have to compare like to like.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:42 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.