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  #1  
Unread 03-14-2018, 10:15 AM
skywalkr skywalkr is offline
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Posts: 101
Default Deadlifting again post psoas injury

I had a psoas injury that I thought was a myriad of other things thanks to 3 doctors not being able to figure it out. Finally got referred to a physical therapist for sports hernia treatment only to have her figure out that it was my psoas that was incredibly tight and had been for a long time (I likely pulled/strained it as well). Since it took me forever to get it figured out I pretty much stopped any lower body training for over a year because anytime I'd deadlift or squat it would flare back up.

I completed my physical therapy and continue to do the exercises/stretches that were prescribed but now I want to get back into deadlifting but I am not sure what the best approach is. My PT said to take it slow but that was really all the advice she had for me and I was hoping someone could provide some insight for a more thought out approach.

Either way I plan to start really light (less than 135 lbs) but would there be any advantage to doing high rep work as I increase the weight thus increasing it a bit slower or 4-6 rep sets and be able to increase the weight a bit quicker? Prior to my injury I had a 400 lb+ deadlift, nothing amazing but starting back with less than 135 lbs I know I will be able to progress quickly but I want to progress in an intelligent way as to not re-aggravate my psoas.

Any suggestions?
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Unread 03-14-2018, 11:01 AM
lylemcdonald lylemcdonald is offline
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Unless you ahve training plates or light bumpers you can't safely start below 135 or the weight won't be at the right height.

But when returning from a layoff, train as a beginner.
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Unread 03-14-2018, 11:29 AM
skywalkr skywalkr is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2014
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lylemcdonald View Post
Unless you ahve training plates or light bumpers you can't safely start below 135 or the weight won't be at the right height.

But when returning from a layoff, train as a beginner.
Thanks Lyle, I found some great information in this arcticle, Returning to Training After a Layoff Q&A, and the Beginning Weight Training series that will definitely point me in the right direction. Also, I have 10 and 25 lb bumpers so I am good there.
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Unread 03-14-2018, 07:12 PM
spmurph spmurph is offline
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Never had an injury, but if I "pull" too much at the start and extend too much at the top, my hip flexors get strained.

If I concentrate on pressing through the floor, it seems to help.
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