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  #1  
Unread 05-24-2018, 05:48 AM
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alcahuetej alcahuetej is offline
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Default What muscles does this external rotation exercise work?

I have had some pain in the front of my shoulder, which I've had in the past (years ago), so I'm going through all my usual routines to calm it down. Avoiding what hurts, ice, stretching, lots of rowing, RC work, serratus work...etc.

However, I also have pain in the posterior shoulder, and I've discovered it's specifically during this exercise.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sH1qaz0WH_M

I also feel it during seated cable rows, but oddly not during Hammer Iso Lateral Rows (done unilaterally). Dips also irritate the crap out of it.

Any idea what muscle that is in my shoulder that's irritated? And what to avoid (other than seated rows and dips). Also what to do to help rehab it?

I've also started reintroducing YTWLs into my routine. My PT showed me how to do these years ago, but had me do them laying face down on the floor, and simply raising my arm off the floor and holding the contraction one arm at a time. With a focus on activating only the lower trap, and not the lats/upper traps.

I've done some searching online and see these performed with one arm hanging off a table, or prone on an exercise ball or incline bench two arms at a time. I find I have trouble isolating the lower trap doing it this way, am I doing something wrong?

Thanks in advance.
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  #2  
Unread 05-24-2018, 07:34 AM
AlphaBettor AlphaBettor is offline
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Main movers in external rotation are the infraspinatus and teres minor, with some assistance from the posterior delt. Since this done while in abduction, supraspinatus should also be active, according to: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21064160

Supraspinatus might be a good place to start (especially if you can do something like lying dumbbell external rotations pain-free) but diagnosing injuries is not so simple.
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  #3  
Unread 05-24-2018, 08:30 AM
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alcahuetej alcahuetej is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlphaBettor View Post
Main movers in external rotation are the infraspinatus and teres minor, with some assistance from the posterior delt. Since this done while in abduction, supraspinatus should also be active, according to: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21064160

Supraspinatus might be a good place to start (especially if you can do something like lying dumbbell external rotations pain-free) but diagnosing injuries is not so simple.
Cool, thanks. This sounds about right.

I forgot to mention that yes, I can do external rotations (not lying, I do them standing) with my arm in adduction completely pain free.
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  #4  
Unread 05-24-2018, 11:28 AM
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https://www.ors.org/Transactions/60/1016.pdf

This is interesting.

Results: After external rotation exercise at 0 degrees of abduction, the SUV of the infraspinatus was the highest among all the shoulder muscles (Table1). Interestingly, after external rotation exercise at 90 degrees of abduction, the teres minor showed the highest SUV values in 6 out of 7 subjects (Table1)."

Maybe Teres Minor?
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  #5  
Unread 05-24-2018, 12:16 PM
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kyoun1e kyoun1e is offline
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Make sure you pound the hell out of your pec minor.

I've had shoulder impingement so many times. You can do the usual shoulder rehab until the cows come home, but unless that pec minor gets loose you could just end up banging your head against the wall.

Wall (or floor)...meet Mr. Racket ball...Mr. Racket ball...meet pec minor.
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  #6  
Unread 05-24-2018, 01:22 PM
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alcahuetej alcahuetej is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyoun1e View Post
Make sure you pound the hell out of your pec minor.

I've had shoulder impingement so many times. You can do the usual shoulder rehab until the cows come home, but unless that pec minor gets loose you could just end up banging your head against the wall.

Wall (or floor)...meet Mr. Racket ball...Mr. Racket ball...meet pec minor.
I'll try that. My infraspinatus usually turns into a huge painful knot (on both sides) and that typically "fixes" things. Sure enough there was a huge knot on both sides, but after massaging both out over the course of a week or so, that didn't help my right shoulder.
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  #7  
Unread 05-24-2018, 06:10 PM
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alcahuetej alcahuetej is offline
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Palpated the heck out of my pec minor. Nothing there. And not flying blind, I have The Trigger Point Therapy workbook.

Oh well. Unless Iím checking in the wrong place or doing it wrong...
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  #8  
Unread 05-29-2018, 08:43 AM
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I've added in upright rows with a rope (per Lyle's article on the form). Low weight, high reps, these give me no pain whatsoever.

What's interesting is my rear delts are sore on both sides, but on the right side this is also where I experience pain (again, not during upright rows).
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  #9  
Unread 06-13-2018, 10:36 AM
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alcahuetej alcahuetej is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlphaBettor View Post
Main movers in external rotation are the infraspinatus and teres minor, with some assistance from the posterior delt. Since this done while in abduction, supraspinatus should also be active, according to: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21064160

Supraspinatus might be a good place to start (especially if you can do something like lying dumbbell external rotations pain-free) but diagnosing injuries is not so simple.
Went to the PT today.

Nailed, itís the supraspinatus. I have poor scapular stability in my right shoulder.

Basically have hammer away at rows, get a lot of lower trap work in. All pressing is out, but I can still somewhat work chest with low standing cable flyes.

I can try push ups, but thereís still some residual inflammation in the front of the shoulder. If that gets aggravated, then stay away from push ups for another week or two.
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