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  #1  
Unread 07-10-2019, 02:02 PM
lylemcdonald lylemcdonald is offline
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Default Muscular Tension Part 1

A detailed look at muscular tension and why it's important
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  #2  
Unread 07-11-2019, 04:40 AM
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zLeeKo zLeeKo is offline
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"A heavy set of 5 and a set of 30 taken to failure probably both get about 5 full recruitment reps. The 30 reps to failure just made you do 25 pointless reps to get there."

This is such a good line. And not only it's pointless, but also painful.

Great read.
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  #3  
Unread 07-11-2019, 07:51 AM
lylemcdonald lylemcdonald is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zLeeKo View Post
"A heavy set of 5 and a set of 30 taken to failure probably both get about 5 full recruitment reps. The 30 reps to failure just made you do 25 pointless reps to get there."

This is such a good line. And not only it's pointless, but also painful.

Great read.
Yeah. BFR has a coulpe of purposes. Injury, when you've maxed out hte weight. Beyond that it's pointless adn painful and accomplishes no more than heavy training. And even less in that it doesn't increase strength or bone mineral density. But it sure looks cool on Instagram.
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Unread 07-11-2019, 08:16 AM
skywalkr skywalkr is offline
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Really good article, it makes a ton of sense but I never had put it all together before. Looking forward to the rest of the series.

I have been having aching shoulders lately from heavy overhead work, from reading this it seems like I could mix in some lighter weight dumbbell bench work but do it as myo reps and still achieve similar effective reps as compared to more traditional heavier barbell work. Give the joints a little break while still working the muscle well.
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  #5  
Unread 07-12-2019, 07:40 AM
ssg10587 ssg10587 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skywalkr View Post
Really good article, it makes a ton of sense but I never had put it all together before. Looking forward to the rest of the series.

I have been having aching shoulders lately from heavy overhead work, from reading this it seems like I could mix in some lighter weight dumbbell bench work but do it as myo reps and still achieve similar effective reps as compared to more traditional heavier barbell work. Give the joints a little break while still working the muscle well.
I'd read this thread. Personally I've moved away from barbell for pretty much everything except pulling exercises like DL and rack pull. They obviously work, I just find them to bother my joints much more.

http://forums.lylemcdonald.com/showthread.php?t=35313
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  #6  
Unread 07-17-2019, 12:53 PM
lylemcdonald lylemcdonald is offline
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Part 2
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  #7  
Unread 07-24-2019, 05:46 PM
lylemcdonald lylemcdonald is offline
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Part 3
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  #8  
Unread 07-25-2019, 06:15 AM
Twitchy Twitchy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lylemcdonald;
If someone doesn’t add weight to the bar over time, no matter what else they do, they will not be any larger than they were before. Not unless they progressively add drugs.
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Originally Posted by lylemcdonald;
It’s only a statement about the fact that over time, adding weight to the bar for any given individual will result in them becoming larger than they were previously.
Simple, yet one of the biggest things I missed when I first started training. I can't expect growth in my size if their wasn't growth in the weight I lifted.

Great work Lyle.
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  #9  
Unread 07-25-2019, 11:23 AM
AlphaBettor AlphaBettor is offline
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This is a good series that has brought some sanity back to the discussion.

If I had one nitpick it's that I'd say it's progression that is the key. Adding weight to the bar might be the easiest/simplest forms of progression but it's far from the only one.

Take somebody who does a beginner weight program and works up to 185 pounds on the bench press for 3 sets of 5. He's taking 3-5 minutes per set and his form is decent, but far from perfect.

Now, his joints aren't so good or he's worried about ripping the pec from the insertion or whatever. So over the course of months (maybe years) he stays at 185 pounds, but progresses to 4 sets of 8. He tightens up his form and cuts rest periods to 2 minutes between sets.

That guy got bigger in some combination of the chest/anterior delts/triceps without adding weight. These aren't unreasonable or unrealistic parameters either.

If all other factors are equated then of course you'd have to add weight, but why do they have to be equal? There's a good range of rep ranges, set counts, rest time, volumes etc. that are effective for hypertrophy. Also these effects are multiplicative, not additive, so they can account for a good deal of progress in their own right.
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  #10  
Unread 07-25-2019, 12:52 PM
lylemcdonald lylemcdonald is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlphaBettor View Post
This is a good series that has brought some sanity back to the discussion.

If I had one nitpick it's that I'd say it's progression that is the key. Adding weight to the bar might be the easiest/simplest forms of progression but it's far from the only one.

Take somebody who does a beginner weight program and works up to 185 pounds on the bench press for 3 sets of 5. He's taking 3-5 minutes per set and his form is decent, but far from perfect.

Now, his joints aren't so good or he's worried about ripping the pec from the insertion or whatever. So over the course of months (maybe years) he stays at 185 pounds, but progresses to 4 sets of 8. He tightens up his form and cuts rest periods to 2 minutes between sets.

That guy got bigger in some combination of the chest/anterior delts/triceps without adding weight. These aren't unreasonable or unrealistic parameters either.

If all other factors are equated then of course you'd have to add weight, but why do they have to be equal? There's a good range of rep ranges, set counts, rest time, volumes etc. that are effective for hypertrophy. Also these effects are multiplicative, not additive, so they can account for a good deal of progress in their own right.
Show me the guy who kept the weight at 185 for years(?) and continue to grow and I'll believe you. But they don't exist.
And you can go into any gym in any part of the world and prove it to yourself. Go today, pick a guy and note his weights. Check back in a year. Same weight, same size. Period. YOu will say "but he didn't futz around with irrelevant training variables." Perhaps but that's a copout. And it doesn't work.

Going from 3X5 to 4x8 with a shorter rest won't make anybody grow for long. And it shouldn't take years to make that progression to begin with. 3 reps is a 10% increase or so. So going 3X5 to 3X8 requires that much improvement. Add a 4th set and, meh, whatever.

Going from 3X5 to 3X8 is the equivalent of going from 3X5@185 to 3X5@~205 (185*1.1). If that takes you years, your training sucks. Even to add a4 th set. May add a few weeks. So you've given me a progression for YEARS (?) that should take a few months at best. And you think it will give continuous growth because you cut the RI by 15 seconds or dick around with sets and reps and frequency? You can't possibly believe this.

Because in those 'years' it took to add an inconsequentical amount to the bar, I can take dude to 275X5 or whatever. And he'll grow. And your example will not.

I directly addressed 'tighter' technique in Part 3. Are you sure you read it? I wouldn't let them get to 185X3X5 with poor technique to begin with. Proper technique is assumed/implied/required.

And your last paragraph is a total non sequitur. That there are different combinations of such doesn't change a word I wrote.

Take the guy adding weight over years to the bar
Compare him to the guy futzing around with acute variables over years to the bar

I know who will be bigger. It's not even arguable. Because every gym is filled with dude 2. And for years they show no growth. NONE. They can do everything you talked about and if they got no stronger, they got no bigger.

It's why Doggcrapp training got guys doing everything you talked about growing again. It got them to 'beat the record' book and get stronger in a moderate range. Genuinely, read the entire series again.

Becuase if you can show me a guy who kept getting bigger benching no more tahn 185 for years, I'll believe you.
Because I can show you thousands of guys who did that and never gained an ounce. It didn't matter what else they did in their training. Set,s reps, rest interval, density, all of that. IT did nothing. It does nothing. Most trainees in every gym in the world can disprove every word of whaty ou wrote.

AT BEST acute manipulation can cause some growth in the short term. As I explicitly said. And eventually it stops. Period.

So yeah, it's not JUST progression. It's progressive tension overload. Without it, IN THE LONG TERM, nothing you wrote about matters.
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