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  #1  
Unread 12-10-2017, 08:27 AM
manofsteel manofsteel is offline
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Default Obese and looking for some pointers on diet

I am 5'8, about 230 pounds, male, have a problem with binge eating, basically inactive, 31 years old. My goal is to get to a relatively healthy weight and be able to maintain it. I am pretty much inactive but plan on adding exercise soon enough. I want to be able to have good enough cardio for long hikes and other outdoor activities (rock climbing and ropes course mainly) but that is secondary to overall health.

This study about alternating two weeks of dieting and two weeks of maintenance being superior for long term metabolism and weight loss makes me think I should be taking a diet break every two weeks.

https://www.nature.com/articles/ijo2...PhnTq1t4xZzv04

I am not in any rush to lose weight really. I just want to get to a healthy weight eventually without it being a huge struggle. Anyway, I have some pretty serious issues with binge eating. I kind of want to stick to one meal a day at about 6:30 pm. On my two weeks of diet I want it to be 1800 calories and my two weeks of maintenace (which may be slightly less than maintenance) I want to eat at about 2500 calories. I would like to eat one meal per day on each of these but actually have a bit of trouble eating 2500 calories in one meal on my maintenance weeks.

For overall health, would it be better to eat calorically dense foods (potato chips for example) to make it easier to get to 2500 calories on those 2 week maintenance periods, or just eat healthy foods and maybe not worry about hitting 2500 calories on those off weeks?

One solution would be to eat more than one meal a day when I am eating at maintenance but I kind of want my body to get used to just having one meal a day. I feel like if I can stick to one meal a day in the long term I will be able to maintain a healthy weight. Do you guys have any suggestions?
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  #2  
Unread 12-10-2017, 08:57 AM
Determinism Determinism is online now
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You need sufficient micronutrients. Don't eat calorie dense food, that's a horrible idea and will stimulate the habits you want to change in the first place. It's better to have 2 meals separated by a few hours containing a lot of vegetables and protein than to eat a bag of chips and come to the realization that it leads nowhere. Even though the amount of calories may match.

Also, you tell us that you want to lose the weight "eventually". I understand you're not in a hurry and evidently instant gratification is the wrong mind set. However, based on the way you write, it seems as if you want the way of least resistance (why only one big meal? why the frequent diet breaks? what does "soon enough" imply? etc.).

I think that for long term success, you need to evolve and learn how to become more disciplined and how to set priorities in life. Life will not stop after you diet. You WILL be tempted and you WILL have hurdles. You need to develop some character to deal with those things, diet is only a small part of that.

Sorry if this sounds a little bit negative, but I want to make the point clear that although you're just starting out, you're setting yourself up for failure (probably subconsciously). I honestly want you to succeed and hope these indications/points will help you.
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  #3  
Unread 12-10-2017, 09:14 AM
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bstrong bstrong is offline
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IMO, you are overthinking this. You can probably go pretty far, and without triggering binges, by following the "Eat Less, Move More" plan.

Want something more regimented? Calculate your daily maintenance calories using an on-line calculator and subtract 10-25%, depending on how quickly you want to lose weight. Work on hitting your calorie target over the course of a week. You'll have to weigh and measure your food until you gain an eye for proper serving sizes given your targets. Readjust calories after 2 weeks if your weight isn't going down.

As for the question of whether you need diet breaks: Maybe, but not after just 2 weeks at a modest calorie deficit. 2 on, 2 off strikes me as a recipe for spinning your wheels.

As for the binge eating, if it's a true disorder (afflicts about 2% of male population), talk to a mental health professional. If it's the usual "I ate a bag of potato chips and blew my diet" overeating that many people call binging, don't buy potato chips and cut down on the activities (e.g., drinking, watching TV) that trigger you to overeat.

//bstrong
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  #4  
Unread 12-10-2017, 01:37 PM
Determinism Determinism is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bstrong View Post
As for the binge eating, if it's a true disorder (afflicts about 2% of male population)
Where's that number coming from?
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Unread 12-10-2017, 01:39 PM
w1cked w1cked is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Determinism View Post
Where's that number coming from?
NEDA gives 2% for males
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  #6  
Unread 12-10-2017, 02:33 PM
manofsteel manofsteel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Determinism View Post
However, based on the way you write, it seems as if you want the way of least resistance (why only one big meal? why the frequent diet breaks? what does "soon enough" imply? etc.).
I want to eat one big meal because it is the easiest way to eat low calorie and feel somewhat satisfied at least once a day. Even if I split 1800 calories into 2 meals spaced a couple hours apart I am never really full. If I eat 1800 calories quickly I get quite full and feel satisfied.

I want to keep up one meal a day during my 2500 calorie 2 week phase because I feel like it would make things easier in my dieting phase, where it actually is a big benefit for me to eat one meal per day. Basically I want to be in a habit of eating once per day every day no matter how many calories I eat. The only time I would alter this would be if I was working out earlier in the day, as I would want to eat something before and possibly after that so I wouldn't be working out fasted.

As for binge eating disorder, I would probably meet the criteria but I don't have money to go and talk to someone about it really. And I don't really even know what kind of help anyone could give me. It is mostly up to me just sticking with my diet.

The frequent diet breaks are mainly due to the study posted originally saying that metabolism after weight loss is a lot better in people that alternate dieting and 2 week diet breaks. Also they lose more weight for the same amount of dieting. So if I want to do this for the long term, and am not really in a rush, it is probably in my best interest to do it with 2 week diet breaks so when I get to my goal weight I will already know how to eat at maintenance properly and I will also have a better working metabolism.
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  #7  
Unread 12-10-2017, 03:50 PM
InsertCleverNameHere InsertCleverNameHere is offline
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Why not make the easiest changes first? I was once close to the same weight you are, and I don't think I've ever really counted calories, for example.

If you drink regular sodas, you could substitute water. If you eat a lot of junk food, you can limit it to only the weekends. Go for a walk every morning. Start doing some body weight exercises a couple of days a week. Stuff like that.

Although I'm not qualified to comment on it, I suspect the mental health issues are going to be what really needs to be dealt with in the end.
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  #8  
Unread 12-10-2017, 03:58 PM
manofsteel manofsteel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InsertCleverNameHere View Post
Why not make the easiest changes first? I was once close to the same weight you are, and I don't think I've ever really counted calories, for example.

If you drink regular sodas, you could substitute water. If you eat a lot of junk food, you can limit it to only the weekends. Go for a walk every morning. Start doing some body weight exercises a couple of days a week. Stuff like that.

Although I'm not qualified to comment on it, I suspect the mental health issues are going to be what really needs to be dealt with in the end.
I used to be about 100 pounds heavier. I am either actively gaining weight or losing weight. I am either eating way more food than I should or dieting. Unless my diet is strict and regimented it is completely off. If I don't have an exact idea of how many calories I should be eating or what I am eating, I will eat farrrr more than I should.
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  #9  
Unread 12-10-2017, 04:58 PM
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Liberty Liberty is offline
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This is just what worked for me personally.

I had dieted many many times in my life but never with any success. At the start of 2016 I took a hard look at my track record and admitted that I was always trying to white-knuckle it. I decided that I wouldn't try to diet in 2016. If I kept trying to lose weight without having any healthy habits in place, I'd waste another year no matter what.

So what I did instead was try to visualize -- if my next diet were successful, what would my diet and exercise look like during and after that? What were the habits I would need to have in order to make it stick this time? And I made a list, things like:
- eat discrete meals (no grazing all day)
- eat vegetables at lunch
- eat vegetables at dinner
- drink water instead of soda
- take a multivitamin every day
- pick one type of exercise and do it regularly

Then I chose one item at a time and worked on it before adding another item. (My mental setup was "15 days, 15 dollars" -- work on it for about half a month and then buy myself a reward that cost about $15, like a new shirt or fancy lipstick). Every few months I would stop adding new things and work on strengthening the habits I'd already added but gotten sloppy about. I spent the whole year working on this. By the end of it I was doing almost all the things I visualized myself doing.

I started dieting in 2017 and lost 60 pounds. Now I'm embarking on my first-ever attempt at maintenance -- and I know for sure I wouldn't have a chance if I hadn't taken the time to build these habits. (But it did take me a really, really long time with a lot of failures to get to a place where I was willing to put off dieting and build habits, instead of thinking "Want to be thin NOW! Must try harder!")
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  #10  
Unread 12-10-2017, 05:03 PM
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Liberty Liberty is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manofsteel View Post
As for binge eating disorder, I would probably meet the criteria but I don't have money to go and talk to someone about it really.
Do you have meetings of SMART Recovery in your area? They are free and use cognitive behavioral therapy techniques to deal with damaging behaviors. They are geared towards addiction but I attended meetings to deal with my compulsive eating and bingeing, and I found it immensely helpful. (They also have online meetings if they don't meet in your area.)

http://www.smartrecovery.org/

(Again, just what worked for me personally.)
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