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  #31  
Unread 02-18-2010, 12:35 PM
Moyer Moyer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lylemcd View Post
Buy a nutrition textbook, any of them, this is discussed. Because so far you said "I bet" which means that YOU get to back up YOUR assertion. Or haven't you noticed that I don't make things up when I make the claim EVER. Yet this one you're going to challenge me for backup?

Sorry, most of the reserach on this was done ages ago (e.g. atudies back in the 50's where they gave stuff like 1.5 kg of meat all at once and measured digestion with NO difference in digestion efficeincy) which is where the numbers come from; but they can't be medlined becuase it doesn't go back that far. So get the RDA handbook or a basic nutritional physiology textbook or YOU can come up with backing for YOUR claim beyond "That's what I think."
That's really all I was looking for. I would never ask you to dig up and post full studies for something like this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lylemcd
Because the logic doesn't even work and, facutally we know that the obese, if anything (due to gut bacterial differences) absorb slightly MORE calories from their food. And you're trying to logic that their bi meals should be absorbed more poorly. Which makes NO sense.
The obese have more gut bacteria because they eat big meals all the time, several times a day every day. That's a little different from some of the people here who do IF or EOD refeeds or were otherwise on low carb/low fat diets before eating the large meal.
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  #32  
Unread 02-18-2010, 02:03 PM
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andregregoire andregregoire is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lylemcd View Post
I guessing you didn't pay attention to this:

"Iím going to ask readers not to read anything into the above paragraph, donít infer or try to draw conclusions about how alcohol might or mightnít fit into the diet in terms of anything. As it turns out, alcohol is an oddity among nutrients with seemingly contradictory effects on things. Iím going to address that in detail in a forthcoming article and, for now, just take the above as some much needed background information."

Because I knew, with 100% certainty that someone would ask exactly what you asked. and if I'd had any intention of addressing that type of thing, I wouldn't ave put in the above paragraph in the article.
Interesting topic, I can't wait to see the article and how Lyle uses this.

For curious people like me try searching for:

1. Alcohol induced hypoglycemia
2. Alcohol hepatic gluconeogenesis
3. Alcohol insulin sensitivity skeletal muscle

I am kidding don't look this up, wait for the article.
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  #33  
Unread 02-18-2010, 04:24 PM
Fried Bacon Fried Bacon is offline
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I guess if you eat all of your daily fiber in 1 meal, that means more food not absorbed by that meal because of the fiber, so its probably not surprising to see gummies, and probably depends if you chew or not. Kinda like TEF and meal frequency, you are going to have some unabsorbed food with every meal so long as theres fiber I guess.
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  #34  
Unread 02-18-2010, 04:32 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Still has nothing to do with meal size per se, that has to do with fiber content.
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  #35  
Unread 02-19-2010, 10:26 AM
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Zoso Zoso is offline
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Great article - made good sense and was a very nice breakdown of the topic.

You may get to this in an upcoming article, Lyle, but after reading this it has me thining about the time of day you consume nutrients as well as the total calories consumed - how do either (or both) of those affect storage vs. oxidation?

In other words, once I exceed the calories that I've 'burned' for the day, doesn't everything get stored (and possibly as fat)? Or might I be able to go over more easily with carbs, for example, especially if they are some of the last nutrients I eat in the day? I know on UD2 we can 'over-eat' carbs and not gain fat, but I'm thinking more in terms of a maintenance or 'normal' diet.

thanks!
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  #36  
Unread 02-19-2010, 03:44 PM
AlphaOmega AlphaOmega is offline
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Just like my hero...Jesse Jackson.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lylemcd View Post
I refuse to be oppressed by things like a dictionary.
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  #37  
Unread 02-20-2010, 06:14 PM
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andregregoire andregregoire is offline
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Question 1:

How long does it take for the body to switch between oxidizing fat to carbs and vice versa?

Lots of the DC guy are advocating Protein + Carb meals and Protein + Fat meals basically like Berardi's non-mixing diet.

I have done it in the past mostly for convenience cause I like to save carbs for breakfast, lunch and dinner and then I have no carbs at my other 3 meals. I find it annoying to have 22g of carbs 6 times per day.

I do find splitting meals between P+C and P+F is working surprisingly well.

I figure that the carb meals are giving me bigger insulin spikes and I am burning fat in between the carb meals.

What's your opinion?
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  #38  
Unread 02-20-2010, 06:19 PM
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andregregoire andregregoire is offline
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Question 2:

Several studies have shown that caffeine can change substrate utilization from carbs to fats and I am surprised it wasn't mentioned in the article.

What is your take on how caffeine can change substrate utilisation?

During the study where they used a very high dose of caffeine to help athletes carbup quicker I figure that the carbs taken in where diverted to glycogen and the FFA in the blood from the caffeine were used as energy.

This situation is kind of the same situation that we are in when we are starting the carb-up in UD2, still burning fat for energy and the glucose is diverted to glycogen.

Do you think caffeine can be used strategically to change oxidation?
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  #39  
Unread 02-20-2010, 06:21 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Maybe at insanely massive doses.
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  #40  
Unread 02-21-2010, 07:25 AM
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andregregoire andregregoire is offline
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Thanks Lyle what about question 1:

How long does it take for the body to switch between oxidizing fat to carbs and vice versa?
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