BodyRecomposition Support Forums  

Go Back   BodyRecomposition Support Forums > My products > The Protein Book
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Unread 04-16-2009, 09:59 AM
danielrb danielrb is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 9
Default Protein Intake Variable

I found myself spinning my wheels trying to cut no matter how low I took my calories I couldnt lose weight. My diet was keto and initially I was doing

240g Protein 100g Fat at about ~ 1900 cals

My LBM is ~150lb
I switched my protein intake to 1g per lb. of LBM and replaced the calories with fat for a total of:

150g Protein, 150g Fat so about ~1900 cals

I remained bloated and the scale would not move until I lowered my protein intake, and the bloat was gone within 2-3 days. Im assuming it was converting over into carbs and my body was not burning fat as it should.

So for some people is a higher protein intake just not needed beyond 1g per lb of LBM, and experimentation just needs to be done to make that determination?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Unread 04-16-2009, 10:11 AM
lylemcd's Avatar
lylemcd lylemcd is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 22,641
Default

There is likely to be individual variation in this, for sure.

I'd ask what sources of protein you dropped, I wonder if it wasn't some type of food intolerance.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Unread 04-16-2009, 10:36 AM
danielrb danielrb is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 9
Default

All of my protein source have stayed the same, I use a variance of chicken, steak, and whey isolate. I have been trying to figure out forever what was causing the bloat I bought digestion enzymes, probiotics, betaine hcl, and went months with nothing. I drop the protein and 3 days later an inch is gone from my waist, my face is leaner and I have more energy. So it might have been cortisol related.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Unread 04-21-2009, 10:05 AM
lylemcd's Avatar
lylemcd lylemcd is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 22,641
Default

Weird, sounds almost like a food intolerance as I don't see how lots of protein per se would cause that. But if you didn't change protein sources, taht doesn't explain it either.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Unread 04-22-2009, 01:06 AM
cycomiko cycomiko is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 277
Default

I am sure I have noticed a similar thing, but havent spent enough time playing around with it

there is some metabolomic work coming out examining higher levels of BCAA and their effect on various processes. One of the recent papers was looking at BCAA and insulin resistance

Cell Metab. 2009 Apr;9(4):311-26.

A branched-chain amino acid-related metabolic signature that differentiates obese and lean humans and contributes to insulin resistance.

Newgard CB, An J, Bain JR, Muehlbauer MJ, Stevens RD, Lien LF, Haqq AM, Shah SH, Arlotto M, Slentz CA, Rochon J, Gallup D, Ilkayeva O, Wenner BR, Yancy WS Jr, Eisenson H, Musante G, Surwit RS, Millington DS, Butler MD, Svetkey LP.

Sarah W. Stedman Nutrition and Metabolism Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA. newga002@mc.duke.edu

Metabolomic profiling of obese versus lean humans reveals a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA)-related metabolite signature that is suggestive of increased catabolism of BCAA and correlated with insulin resistance. To test its impact on metabolic homeostasis, we fed rats on high-fat (HF), HF with supplemented BCAA (HF/BCAA), or standard chow (SC) diets. Despite having reduced food intake and a low rate of weight gain equivalent to the SC group, HF/BCAA rats were as insulin resistant as HF rats. Pair-feeding of HF diet to match the HF/BCAA animals or BCAA addition to SC diet did not cause insulin resistance. Insulin resistance induced by HF/BCAA feeding was accompanied by chronic phosphorylation of mTOR, JNK, and IRS1Ser307 and by accumulation of multiple acylcarnitines in muscle, and it was reversed by the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin. Our findings show that in the context of a dietary pattern that includes high fat consumption, BCAA contributes to development of obesity-associated insulin resistance.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Unread 04-22-2009, 01:23 AM
Espi Espi is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,491
Default

Would this be because BCAAs induces more insulin activity than other amino acids do?

Dr Bernstein and some other diabetes experts warn against taking protein intake too high as too much protein would be converted into carbs.
__________________
Ergo-log: news & KB on legal and illegal ergogenic aids
Poliquin: "There's no overtraining , only undereating ---> to undereat, don't overtrain!"
Burgener: "There's no overtraining, only underrecovery" --> sleep, rest & recover
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Unread 04-22-2009, 01:33 AM
cycomiko cycomiko is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 277
Default

Because BCAAs have a huge role in the body outside of just being amino acids, in the case of the paper above, messing with mTor
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Unread 04-22-2009, 01:48 AM
Espi Espi is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,491
Default

Can you explain this in layman terms?
All I know is that mTor is one of the most important genes (?) involved with muscle-building.. but don't know much more than this. Is that where I need to buy the Protein Book for ?
Quote:
Because BCAAs have a huge role in the body outside of just being amino acids, in the case of the paper above, messing with mTor
__________________
Ergo-log: news & KB on legal and illegal ergogenic aids
Poliquin: "There's no overtraining , only undereating ---> to undereat, don't overtrain!"
Burgener: "There's no overtraining, only underrecovery" --> sleep, rest & recover
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Unread 04-22-2009, 01:59 AM
cycomiko cycomiko is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 277
Default

Its involved in pathways around protien synthesis, degradation and onwards. In muscles this can be the production of muscle protein.

One of hte hypotheses around high protein adn satiety relate to the way BCAAs influence mTor in the hypothalamus

like

Annu Rev Nutr. 2008;28:295-311.
Related Articles, Links
Click here to read
Regulation of food intake through hypothalamic signaling networks involving mTOR.

Woods SC, Seeley RJ, Cota D.

Department of Psychiatry, Genome Research Institute, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45237, USA. woodssc@ucmail.uc.edu

To maintain normal activity, single cells must assure that their energy needs and utilization are continuously matched. Likewise, multicellular organisms must constantly coordinate energy intake and expenditure to maintain energy homeostasis. The brain, and the hypothalamus in particular, plays a critical role in integrating and coordinating several types of signals, including hormones and nutrients, to guarantee such homeostasis. Like single cells, the hypothalamus also profits from intracellular pathways known to work as fuel sensors to maintain energy balance. One such pathway is the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). mTOR integrates different sensory inputs to regulate protein synthesis rates in individual cells, and it has recently been implicated in the central nervous system to regulate food intake and body weight as well. This review provides an overview of the role of hypothalamic intracellular fuel sensors in the overall control of energy balance and discusses the potential contribution of these fuel-sensing mechanisms to the metabolic dysregulation associated with obesity.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Unread 10-03-2009, 05:32 AM
Loaded
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Weird. I seemed to experience this as well. At about 130-135 pounds at 5 6, if I stray much higher above 150 I feel all bloated and gassy and bathroom trips in the morning aren't that pleasant. For years I had been eating around 2 times my body weight as well. The gas was BAD. I feel much better eating 150 or below. Though since I am trying to gain again I now have to bump up fats and carbs which has me a little paranoid, protein just isn't an option because I hate feeling how I did. Would a 45/25/30 split (c/p/f) be fine or is that too little protein compared to the other macros?
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:47 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.