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  #1  
Unread 04-19-2013, 07:57 PM
atresia atresia is offline
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Default Deadlift Form Check

https://www.dropbox.com/s/iqbl7887tg...2015.38.13.mov

I know I'm shooting my hips and that's probably bad. Does anyone have any suggestions from watching as to how I might fix it, and if there's anything else that needs work?
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  #2  
Unread 04-19-2013, 08:10 PM
Zemix Zemix is offline
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1. Your back is rounded from the beginning. It is not a squat (it looks like youre trying to mimic a squat from your starting position). Start first by bringing the bar 1.5-2 inches away from your shins. Have the bar cut your foot in half. Grab the bar while standing over it, when you sit into it a bit your shins should touch the bar. Ripptoe explains this well in his deadlift 101 video. Here it is: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Syt7A23YnpA

2. Not only are you shooting at the hips, you're trying to turn it into a SDDL and the bar pushes very far away from you as you pick it up. Make the bar drag along your shins/legs/torso as you bring it up. Watch the video above how he sits into the lift (and where the bar is positioned) before he picks it up. This is very important.

3. Your original 'start' position isn't the worst thing in the world but that is not where you actually start the lift from. You get out of this position in about 1 second and lean forward as you pick up the bar. That's when it turns into a SDDL and the bar pushes away from you.

4. When you get the other parts down you need to pick up the bar as if you are pushing your feet through the floor. Your hamstrings/legs should be used a lot in the beginning of the lift and then you should thrust your hips as the bar gets higher to get to lock out.

5. You don't sit into the lift enough before picking up the bar. You push your hips/back up before starting the lift, instead of sitting into it. That's a big reason why your lower back is being used so much.

Watch this video it helped me a lot: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dd0u04L807A

I suggest practicing with 135lbs until you have proper form down.

Last edited by Zemix : 04-19-2013 at 08:45 PM.
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  #3  
Unread 04-19-2013, 08:22 PM
Merch Merch is offline
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To stop myself from shooting the hips when I start the movement, after tightening my abs I think about lifting with my upper back. If I start the pull like that my hips and back come up together instead of my hips coming up before I break the bar off the ground.
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  #4  
Unread 04-19-2013, 09:39 PM
Anna Bollocks Anna Bollocks is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atresia View Post
https://www.dropbox.com/s/iqbl7887tg...2015.38.13.mov

I know I'm shooting my hips and that's probably bad. Does anyone have any suggestions from watching as to how I might fix it, and if there's anything else that needs work?
If you look at the first rep, when you try to break the bar off of the floor, you actually get no contribution from the quads and adductors, hence, your hips shoot back and you are essentially forced to stiff-leg it in a sumo-style position. Of course, this isn’t a good thing to do because you are out of position to effectively “get away” with that kind of a pull in a sumo. You might be able to do this in a conventional set up, but stiff-legging a sumo is an inefficient use of your leverages.

For a sumo pull, you must be able to break the bar off of the floor with the legs while trying to throw your weight backwards. Think up and back. This will help you to be in position to thrust your hips forward as the bar approaches your knees. If you don’t have your body shifting backwards, the heavy weight will start to pull you forward and you’ll wind up out of position, too bent over, as you do in the vid.

In your start position, you might try widening your stance, and getting a more upright back. I think you’re a bit too bent over for an effective sumo start. However, it’s hard to say from the camera angle.

You will have to lighten the weights to work on your technique. If you try to pull like that with heavy weights, you will only continue to ingrain bad habits because the weights will keep forcing you into bad positions.

You might want to take a look at Ed Coan’s deadlift vid :

He gives some pointers for sumo starting @ 2:15.

You have the strength to move the weight your moving, but if you work on improving your sumo technique, you will be far more efficient because you’ll be using the right muscles in the most advantageous way.

You may also have weaknesses with the adductors and/or quads but I think the technical issues should addressed first.

Good luck!
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  #5  
Unread 04-20-2013, 09:20 AM
atresia atresia is offline
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Thanks for the insight, particularly Zemix and Anna Bollocks for your detailed responses. I'll do my best to adjust and implement your suggestions, and will update you on my progress when my deadlifts are picture perfect.
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  #6  
Unread 04-20-2013, 09:21 AM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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I wish there were an article on the main site that dealt with proper DL form.
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  #7  
Unread 05-12-2013, 10:42 PM
atresia atresia is offline
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https://www.dropbox.com/s/7hvrwvhf2g...2014.50.24.mov

Is this acceptable? There's still a bit of hip rise before the weight breaks the ground, but I'm not sure if it's still excessive/problematic.
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  #8  
Unread 05-12-2013, 11:58 PM
Sub Sub is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atresia View Post
https://www.dropbox.com/s/7hvrwvhf2g...2014.50.24.mov

Is this acceptable? There's still a bit of hip rise before the weight breaks the ground, but I'm not sure if it's still excessive/problematic.
Start with the bar over the middle of your foot, then lift. You are starting with it too far forward so it travels back and your hip rises before you lift.
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  #9  
Unread 05-13-2013, 12:42 AM
Anna Bollocks Anna Bollocks is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atresia View Post
https://www.dropbox.com/s/7hvrwvhf2g...2014.50.24.mov

Is this acceptable? There's still a bit of hip rise before the weight breaks the ground, but I'm not sure if it's still excessive/problematic.
Your start position is wrong for pulling sumo-style.

You need to get your hips down and keep your back more upright. This will allow you to use the appropriate leg drive to break the bar off of the floor.

You seem to have a natural tendency to let the hips rise which might indicate you're either not suited for pulling sumo, or would simply be better off pulling conventional.

If you watch the vid, your mechanics look like they want to be conventional. In a sumo, there is no real hip hinge or pivot like a conventional. Rather, it's leg drive, then hip thrust to lock out.

Sumo is a slightly different class of movement pattern. The similarity it shares with conventional is that the bar is pulled from a dead stop; otherwise, they are really two different lifts.
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  #10  
Unread 05-13-2013, 08:23 AM
atresia atresia is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Anna Bollocks View Post
Your start position is wrong for pulling sumo-style.

You need to get your hips down and keep your back more upright. This will allow you to use the appropriate leg drive to break the bar off of the floor.

You seem to have a natural tendency to let the hips rise which might indicate you're either not suited for pulling sumo, or would simply be better off pulling conventional.

If you watch the vid, your mechanics look like they want to be conventional. In a sumo, there is no real hip hinge or pivot like a conventional. Rather, it's leg drive, then hip thrust to lock out.

Sumo is a slightly different class of movement pattern. The similarity it shares with conventional is that the bar is pulled from a dead stop; otherwise, they are really two different lifts.
In past I've had issues with back rounding with the conventional. Maybe I'll give it another shot
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