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  #1  
Unread 03-27-2010, 08:47 PM
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Default Catecholamine Question

Why does catecholamine output increase on a low carb diet?
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Unread 03-27-2010, 08:52 PM
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Because insulin is low during low carb dieting
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Unread 03-27-2010, 09:49 PM
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Yes, but how do low insulin levels raise catecholamines?
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Unread 03-27-2010, 10:07 PM
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Does the mechanism matter practically?
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Unread 03-27-2010, 10:09 PM
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Insulin doesn't raise catecholamines, our body does though. They're like antagonistic hormones. There are some cases though that both hormones are elevated but fat oxidation is low.
E.g.
During the exercise, insulin goes down, while the levels of catecholamines goes up BUT if the trainee drank an electrolyte drink which raises insulin, even catecholamine levels are high, fat oxidation will be impaired. Do you have a copy of UD2? Lyle explained how the process works
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Unread 03-27-2010, 11:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lylemcd View Post
Does the mechanism matter practically?
No. I just was curious to the mechanism. Yes, I have a copy of UD2, but I don't think the mechanism was explained. I'm just wondering how low insulin levels cause the adrenal glands to release more catecholamines.
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Unread 03-27-2010, 11:53 PM
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Catecholamines is a counter regulatory hormones that promotes the release of glucose in the muscle and liver therefore counter the regulatory role of insulin. Epinephrine and nonephinephrine act to increase catabolism and release stored nutrients during exercise while opposing hormones promote the storage and synthesis of biological molecules
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Unread 03-28-2010, 12:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean Paulo View Post
Catecholamines is a counter regulatory hormones that promotes the release of glucose in the muscle and liver therefore counter the regulatory role of insulin. Epinephrine and nonephinephrine act to increase catabolism and release stored nutrients during exercise while opposing hormones promote the storage and synthesis of biological molecules
Okay, let me put this together. It's not necessarily a direct effect or indirect effect at all by the low insulin level stimulating catecholamine release in the adrenal glands. It's more of the dieting effect (which I guess causes these low levels of insulin to occur) that results in catecholamine release.

Let me put it like this, low carb=low insulin release because you aren't stimulating its release into the blood stream to have this carbs/nutrients uptaken by cells.

Because you are on a low carb diet, your body needs to breakdown glycogen in both the liver and skeletal muscle to provide glucose for cellular respiration. Thus, the adrenal medulla produces more catecholamines--specifically epi/nor epi, to be released into the blood stream and used by targeted cells in the breakdown of glycogen.

I'm assuming some of this glucose will then be released by skeletal muscle and the liver into the bloodstream and brought into targeted cells. I'm also assuming this rise in blood glucose levels causes a slight increase in insulin levels. The remaining glucose within the cells (skel muscle/liver) will be used for its own cellular respiration.

Like I said above, the two processes low insulin levels/increased catecholamine output occur independently of one another but are both directly regulated by the low carb diet.

Does the above make sense?
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Unread 03-28-2010, 06:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kimbosliced View Post
No. I just was curious to the mechanism. Yes, I have a copy of UD2, but I don't think the mechanism was explained. I'm just wondering how low insulin levels cause the adrenal glands to release more catecholamines.
Magic catecholamine gremlins. It doesn't matter at the end of the day and just assume 'the body senses something and does something because of it'. How it happens is 100% irrelevant.
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