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  #1  
Unread 04-14-2017, 12:33 PM
BigPecsPeter BigPecsPeter is offline
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Default Should you be able to row more than you bench, or vice versa?

I've found that I've always been able to barbell row (bent overs) considerably more than I can flat bench. Is this expected? I mean, it's patently obvious why one ought to be able to squat and deadlift more than they can bench, but does the same hold (albeit to a lesser degree) for rows?
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  #2  
Unread 04-14-2017, 12:51 PM
Totentanz Totentanz is offline
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I've always had the same experience. However, most people I've known or worked with have been the opposite, even when they tend to cheat the rows using their body to heave it up.

In some cases, it could just be a technique issue with regards to benching.
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Unread 04-14-2017, 01:15 PM
Determinism Determinism is offline
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The row allows for more cheating. For a lot of people, a strict row compromises the position. The heavier it becomes, the more you'll stand upright (center of balance + lower back issues). Thus, hard to compare with bench.

Another thing to consider is that quiet a lot of guys will train bench press much more often and seriously than barbell rows. Therefore, you'll find many of them benching decently, but rowing like a newbie.
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  #4  
Unread 04-14-2017, 02:36 PM
JackMan017@aol.com JackMan017@aol.com is offline
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I'm no expert but I would think the bench would have the edge here.

I find my form needs to be pretty spot on to feel the contractions in the back. Which for me means less weight, i.e. less body english. Ones angle, grip width, body english I think play a fairly good size role in how much weight can be used.
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  #5  
Unread 04-14-2017, 04:40 PM
Ziltoid Ziltoid is offline
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My favourite and most-used horiztontal row variation has been the seal row (which is as strict a barbell-based row as you're going to get) and that's always been a bit better than my bench.
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  #6  
Unread 04-14-2017, 05:22 PM
ssg10587 ssg10587 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Determinism View Post
The row allows for more cheating. For a lot of people, a strict row compromises the position. The heavier it becomes, the more you'll stand upright (center of balance + lower back issues). Thus, hard to compare with bench.

Another thing to consider is that quiet a lot of guys will train bench press much more often and seriously than barbell rows. Therefore, you'll find many of them benching decently, but rowing like a newbie.
This. Row is one of the most common exercises I see people messing up form on. Too much movement, leaning too far back, etc.

I do cable rows and often reference this for monitoring my form. http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/tra...echnique.html/

Once you focus on form with limited torso movement, rowing gets rather hard.
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  #7  
Unread 04-14-2017, 09:49 PM
AlphaBettor AlphaBettor is offline
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A lot of this depends on form, personal anthropometry, and all that.

My bench press weight and chinning weight (bodyweight+extra) have always been close. Barbell row was always somewhat less, although it has been a while since I've done that variation of rows.
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  #8  
Unread 04-15-2017, 12:59 AM
BigPecsPeter BigPecsPeter is offline
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Some very good points here:

It is true, admittedly, that the bent over row is NOT the pure opposite of the flat bench. A more logical comparison would be, as Ziltoid suggests, the seal row.

I'll add though that the bench is almost just as commonly cheated, and prone to cheating, as the row.
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  #9  
Unread 04-15-2017, 02:14 AM
Determinism Determinism is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigPecsPeter View Post
I'll add though that the bench is almost just as commonly cheated, and prone to cheating, as the row.
You're right, it is cheated a lot (half reps anyone?). However, I still think the row can be easier to cheat. You can use a lot of momentum, which cannot be used when benching.
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  #10  
Unread 04-15-2017, 03:22 AM
BigPecsPeter BigPecsPeter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Determinism View Post
You're right, it is cheated a lot (half reps anyone?). However, I still think the row can be easier to cheat. You can use a lot of momentum, which cannot be used when benching.
I dunno, man. What about the chest bounce? Exaggerated leg drive? Etc
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