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  #1  
Unread 03-04-2011, 10:39 AM
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Default What Defines Cardio in Terms of Too Much

Q&A on the main site
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  #2  
Unread 03-08-2011, 01:15 PM
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Followup
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Unread 03-08-2011, 01:36 PM
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Great article!

Some minor grammar things I saw:

Quote:
They dieted folks and looked how whether or not hunger increased.
I may be mistaken, but this sentence sounds weird. Add an "at" after "looked"? Not sure if that still completely fixes this.
Quote:
(my memory may be failing me here, I haven’t looked at number in a while so don’t swear me to these numbers.
Missing the closing parenthesis
Quote:
But does that mean that the BL contestants are still doing things optimally.
Should be question mark instead of period.
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Lyle McDonald wrote:

You need two main exercises:
1. table push aways: When you start to get full, just push away from the table
2. Head shakes: when someone offeres you food not on your diet, twist your head right and then left and repeat going 'No thank you'.

Getting a 6 pack is mostly about losing fat.
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  #4  
Unread 03-08-2011, 02:02 PM
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Got 'em, thanks.
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  #5  
Unread 03-11-2011, 10:38 PM
ram ram is offline
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lyle..would it be correct to say that a leaner guy at 15 %bf trying to get to 10% is to combine a moderate deficit and moderate activity levels to generate decent fat loss and yet still avoid the metabolic issues?
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  #6  
Unread 03-12-2011, 08:14 AM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ram View Post
lyle..would it be correct to say that a leaner guy at 15 %bf trying to get to 10% is to combine a moderate deficit and moderate activity levels to generate decent fat loss and yet still avoid the metabolic issues?
As I asked you before, have you read ANYTHING on the main site. Because there are articles about all this stuff and I'm getting tired of your laziness.
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  #7  
Unread 03-12-2011, 10:01 PM
ram ram is offline
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i read all your almost all of your articles in the main site..but i just cant put that into perspective..thanks for bearing with me.
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  #8  
Unread 03-15-2011, 08:04 AM
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Default Heart rate

I tghought this was going to be about how hard to do cardio.

feel free to move the post, but

what do you think

Calculate Your Own Maximum Aerobic Training Heart Rate

To find your maximum aerobic training heart rate, there are two important steps. First, subtract your age from 180. Next, find the best category for your present state of fitness and health, and make the appropriate adjustments:
1. Subtract your age from 180.
2. Modify this number by selecting among the following categories the one that best matches your fitness and health profile:
a. If you have or are recovering from a major illness (heart disease, any operation or hospital stay, etc.) or are on any regular medication, subtract an additional 10.
b. If you are injured, have regressed in training or competition, get more than two colds or bouts of flu per year, have allergies or asthma, or if you have been inconsistent or are just getting back into training, subtract an additional 5.
c. If you have been training consistently (at least four times weekly) for up to two years without any of the problems just mentioned, keep the number (180–age) the same.
d. If you have been training for more than two years without any of the problems listed above, and have made progress in competition without injury, add 5.

For example, if you are thirty years old and fit into category (b), you get the following:
180–30=150. Then 150–5=145 beats per minute (bpm).

In this example, 145 will be the highest heart rate for all training. This is highly aerobic, allowing you to most efficiently build an aerobic base. Training above this heart rate rapidly incorporates anaerobic function, exemplified by a shift to burning more sugar and less fat for fuel.

If it is difficult to decide which of two groups best fits you, choose the group or outcome that results in the lower heart rate. In athletes who are taking medication that may affect their heart rate, those who wear a pacemaker, or those who have special circumstances not discussed here, further individualization with the help of a healthcare practitioner or other specialist familiar with your circumstance and knowledgeable in endurance sports may be necessary.

Two situations may be exceptions to the above calculations:
• The 180 Formula may need to be further individualized for people over the age of sixty-five. For some of these athletes, up to 10 beats may have to be added for those in category (d) in the 180 Formula, and depending on individual levels of fitness and health. This does not mean 10 should automatically be added, but that an honest self-assessment is important.
• For athletes sixteen years of age and under, the formula is not applicable; rather, a heart rate of 165 may be best.

Once a maximum aerobic heart rate is found, a training range from this heart rate to 10 beats below could be used as a training range. For example, if an athlete’s maximum aerobic heart rate is determined to be 155, that person’s aerobic training zone would be 145 to 155 bpm. However, the more training at 155, the quicker an optimal aerobic base will be developed.

Initially, training at this relatively low rate may be stressful for many athletes. “I just can’t train that slowly!” is a common comment. But after a short time, you will feel better and your pace will quicken at that same heart rate. You will not be stuck training at that relatively slow pace for too long. Still, for many athletes it is difficult to change bad habits.

*****
Having just turned 45 I am thinking the physical adventures.

I want to do 3 sessions of cardio per week (tue, thurs sat)and 2 of weights (sun wed) and 2 off.(mon Fri)

I figure that the cardio sessions should be about 140bpm max =180 - 45 +5.
Now the artice says that aplies to all training, but surely my lifting is going to go into a much higher zone?

Is that bad?
I weigh 93k, my target is 90, but that can take a long time, I am tidy enough.
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  #9  
Unread 03-15-2011, 08:30 AM
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I think your constantly irrelevant postings and clippings from elsewhere annoy the crap out of me, that's what I think.

Stop with these stupid thread hijacks while you're at it.
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