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  #11  
Unread 04-25-2009, 09:05 PM
Fried Bacon Fried Bacon is offline
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Im also interested in some of the articles you are planning to write. Joel from 8weeksout seems to be agitated by erroneous or inefficient crap forms of training being spouted by "expert" mma and fitness gurus. Im guess a T-nation article is as an example how they said aerobic running is completely useless
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  #12  
Unread 04-26-2009, 08:05 AM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Having read what's on his site (and really looking forwards to his book), I think he and I will be saying a lot of the same sorts of things regarding overall conditioning. There's this bad idea on the internets that MMA is a majorly anaerobic sport and that you should just do intervals and complexes and stuff and that's just wrong.
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  #13  
Unread 04-26-2009, 12:42 PM
Fried Bacon Fried Bacon is offline
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Yeah just found this from him
http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/vce/studi...du/EnrgSys.pdf

"production of ATP energy during high-intensity exercise relies on the three
energy systems working together. The phosphocreatine energy system produces energy at the
fastest rate in the first 5 seconds of exercise. Anaerobic glycolysis produces energy at the
fastest rate from the time when the PC system is rapidly depleting up until about 25–30
seconds, after which the aerobic system supplies energy at the fastest rate. However, when the
overall relative energy system contribution is calculated for exercise efforts lasting set time
intervals, the anaerobic energy systems supply the greater proportion of the required energy
for all maximal exercise efforts up to 75 seconds in duration"

Anything more than 0-60seconds will be more aerobic than anaerobic, especially in a 5x5 min mma fight
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  #14  
Unread 04-26-2009, 12:57 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Pretty much yeah. Once you get to events that are 2 minute and longer, yo'ull see that most training is predominantly aerobic.
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  #15  
Unread 11-15-2009, 10:40 AM
sokarokamof sokarokamof is offline
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Default Lactate Threshold Tests Useful at All?

Hi Lyle,

I'm curious - given what you've written in this article about the lactate threshold (blurring the lines between aerobic and anaerobic "zones"), as well as what I've seen elsewhere on your blog and in the forums about lactate not being as directly significant to the anaerobic "zone" as once believed (I believe you mentioned some ion as being perhaps more significant), what are blood lactate threshold tests useful for? I apologize if this is an overbroad question - I've only come to be familiar with the lactate threshold from a fat loss aerobic/anaerobic "zone" perspective. My interest lies mainly in finding a reliable metric with which to limit my cardio exercise intensity, as I tend towards pushing too hard.
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  #16  
Unread 11-15-2009, 10:46 AM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Although lactate does not appear to be causal in fatigue (if anything it buffer acidosis), it can still act as a marker in terms of shifting from oxidative (primarily aerobic) to glycolytic metabolism (where the production of hydrogen ions outstrips the body's ability to handle them through aerobic metabolism).

So practically lactate testing can still be useful as a metric, just realize that lactate per se isn't really the issue or problem. Or you can field test if lactate testing is out of teh realm of possibiliity. Find the steady state intensity/hr combo that you can maintain for 20 minutes. Subtract a percentage from that (5% on power bikes for example). That's your maximal capacity for about an hour which is as good a metric as anything more complex.

Use that level to anchor training intensities. Most practical training manuals for various sports (and I intend to put a list of reading for different sports when I wrap up interval training next week) do something along those lines. So Daniels Vdot method is based on a time trial of some duration, power training uses various methods but 20' time trial is common. Carmicheal uses the average of 2X3 mile or 8 minute time trials minus 10%. Etc.
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  #17  
Unread 04-18-2013, 08:35 PM
joemeista joemeista is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lylemcd View Post
I'm not sure I can get a full article out of 'Not getting caught taking EPO'.
That's hilarious
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