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  #1  
Unread 04-08-2015, 11:44 PM
rihad rihad is offline
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Default 1/3rd of volume while on a caloric deficit

Hi, Lyle. Your "Weight training for fat loss" article says:

Quote:
The basic conclusion, again from both research and practical experience is that both volume and frequency of training can usually be cut by up to 2/3rds (that is, to 1/3rd of what you did to improve it) but with one massively important caveat: the intensity of that training must be maintained.
And what if a person only did 1 working set per exercise when he was bulking, can he assume that 1/3rd of work volume, meaning 1/3rd of the number of repetitions, is still enough to maintain his contractile protein structures? Like when he could bench press a certain amount of weight for 9 reps, and as little as 3 reps close to failure when on an extended caloric deficit.
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Unread 04-09-2015, 06:51 AM
GoldenDilemma GoldenDilemma is offline
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I do singles when bulking. When cutting should I do 1/3rd of the ROM but keep intensity the same?

in4answers.
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  #3  
Unread 04-09-2015, 07:38 AM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rihad View Post
Hi, Lyle. Your "Weight training for fat loss" article says:



And what if a person only did 1 working set per exercise when he was bulking, can he assume that 1/3rd of work volume, meaning 1/3rd of the number of repetitions, is still enough to maintain his contractile protein structures? Like when he could bench press a certain amount of weight for 9 reps, and as little as 3 reps close to failure when on an extended caloric deficit.
No, I'm assuming someone is doing a reasonable workout in the first place.
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  #4  
Unread 04-09-2015, 08:59 AM
rihad rihad is offline
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Single versus multiple sets in long-term recreational weightlifters.

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Both groups significantly improved muscular fitness and body composition as a result of the 13 wk of training. The results show that one-set programs are still effective even after a year of training and that increasing training volume over 13 wk does not lead to significantly greater improvements in fitness for adult recreational weight lifters.
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Unread 04-09-2015, 10:38 AM
LightCrow LightCrow is offline
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You'll get more confirmation bias for the answer you're looking for over at www.drdarden.com.
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  #6  
Unread 04-09-2015, 03:17 PM
BigPecsPeter BigPecsPeter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenDilemma View Post
I do singles when bulking. When cutting should I do 1/3rd of the ROM but keep intensity the same?

in4answers.
1/3rd of the range of motion? Yer WHAT?!
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  #7  
Unread 04-09-2015, 06:42 PM
GoldenDilemma GoldenDilemma is offline
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Originally Posted by BigPecsPeter View Post
1/3rd of the range of motion? Yer WHAT?!


Only when cutting, bro. Come on.
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  #8  
Unread 04-09-2015, 09:46 PM
rihad rihad is offline
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The idea behind all this is quite simple. Strength is the ability to exert force against the given resistance of enough magnitude to lift it, and is a function of both muscle size and energetic buffers (ignoring neural stuff for the moment). During caloric deficit, some of the energetic buffers (glycogen, etc) inevitably shrink. So the body can no longer replenish its ATP stores through the glycolytic pathway at the expected speed it once could, and you can effectively lift a given load for fewer repetitions.

Last edited by rihad : 04-09-2015 at 09:53 PM.
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  #9  
Unread 04-10-2015, 09:32 AM
farrenator farrenator is offline
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That is good and all but how does this pertain to the topic at hand - reduced volume sufficient to maintain LBM?

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Originally Posted by rihad View Post
The idea behind all this is quite simple. Strength is the ability to exert force against the given resistance of enough magnitude to lift it, and is a function of both muscle size and energetic buffers (ignoring neural stuff for the moment). During caloric deficit, some of the energetic buffers (glycogen, etc) inevitably shrink. So the body can no longer replenish its ATP stores through the glycolytic pathway at the expected speed it once could, and you can effectively lift a given load for fewer repetitions.
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