BodyRecomposition Support Forums  

Go Back   BodyRecomposition Support Forums > General information > Articles on the Main Site
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Unread 08-03-2010, 11:53 AM
lylemcd's Avatar
lylemcd lylemcd is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 23,178
Default Permanent Metabolic Damage

Q&A on the main site
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Unread 08-03-2010, 10:53 PM
jwwpua jwwpua is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 96
Default

Quote:
I’d note that only men were studied so it’s possible that women, who are prone to showing more resistance to fat gain, could show a differential response.
Should be "resistance to fat loss"?
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Unread 08-04-2010, 08:30 AM
lylemcd's Avatar
lylemcd lylemcd is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 23,178
Default

Whoops, good catch. Thanks
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Unread 08-13-2010, 10:39 AM
lylemcd's Avatar
lylemcd lylemcd is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 23,178
Default

Followup Q&A
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Unread 03-24-2015, 09:07 PM
lynn lynn is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 7
Default

Hi Lyle. I have a few questions that I would love if you could clarify, about maintenance calories post-dieting.

Quote:
The studies of the post-obese (see next question) suggest that, even at weight maintenance (i.e. when calories have been returned to normal), there is still a small overall reduction in basal metabolic rate (on the order of perhaps 5%) compared to someone who is ‘naturally’ of that weight.
In "Lean Body Mass Maintenance and Metabolic Rate Slowdown", you wrote that this is partially due to loss of LBM, partially a hormonal component causing that "tissues burn fewer calories per unit mass", and partially reduced activity level.

Like you wrote, activity level is easily compensated for by being more active, that's more of a result we are responsible for than something out of reach. My question is about the LBM and hormonal part.

Quote:
However, the long-term studies of the post-obese (ranging from 2-5 years if my memory serves correctly) suggest that the effect on basal metabolic rate never goes away.
1. LBM effect: Can we not simply "fix" this by adding muscle through weight training?
2. Hormonal effect:
2.a. Does increasing muscle mass by the above question affect the hormonal balance/tissues burning more calories, at all?
2.b. What about improving cardiovascular performance?
2.c. These data seem to come from post-obese populations. Would we expect different results for individuals who are going from lean to leaner? Perhaps a more extreme hormonal effect?
3. Theoretically, I guess this part would be just speculation, if one was to diet up and down between 20% and 30% BF (f), would the BMR effects get progressively worse over time, or do they get "reset" when the bf goes back up (plus you gain not only fat but some LBM as you gain weight) so the overall effect will not be very different?

Quote:
“So what about people who get and stay lean in the long-term, how do they do it?” Maybe addressing that will get me past my writer’s block to write an actual article about it.
If you've actually written about this, I missed it, but as a short conclusion, is there anything more to it than either eating less food or compensating with more exercise like you wrote?
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Unread 03-25-2015, 07:23 AM
lylemcd's Avatar
lylemcd lylemcd is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 23,178
Default

Yes, you can fix the muscle part

The hormonal part is related to caloric intake, bodyfat, set point. It gets fixed by getting fat again.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Unread 05-10-2015, 12:40 PM
Taytay100 Taytay100 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 178
Default

In for this.

As a dieted down person i've been interested in the 'permanent' adaptive thermogensis side of dieting and getting lean. So lyle, after calculating new BW and activity level to establish new maintenance. One should reduce that number by a further 5% just incase?
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Unread 05-10-2015, 02:16 PM
lylemcd's Avatar
lylemcd lylemcd is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 23,178
Default

I use 5-10% as a conservative estimate to start. Then adjust based on real world changes.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Unread 05-10-2015, 02:51 PM
Taytay100 Taytay100 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 178
Default

Thanks lyle.

I guess this is a very black and white topic for the most part. Its unusual because i know of a few ex obese people who lost a tonne of weight (started off fatter than me), got lean, and now maintaining on very high amount of calories. Seems like i, with many people picked the short straw with hormonal f*** ups.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.