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  #11  
Unread 07-25-2009, 06:27 AM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toiletmoose View Post
A somewhat related question, does this mean that high intensity work can be used to maintain and not improve aerobic and anaerobic capacity on a an abbreviated time-efficient routine as compared to lower intensity work?
Define your terms, as I stated in the article, one issue with the whole interval thing is that power and capacity are not the same thing and are differentially determined. VO2 max isn't endurnace and vice versa.
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  #12  
Unread 07-25-2009, 09:53 PM
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yes, how to program the training to achieve a certain distance within a set period of time.
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  #13  
Unread 07-25-2009, 10:06 PM
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Most running training for anything past about 800m is slow easy distance. They top this off with lactate threshold work and some speed work to sharpen and improve speed. There can be strides to improve running economy.

Obviously at some point you have to be able to hit race pace for whatever time you want (e.g. a 1 hour 10k is about a 10 minute mile).

But most of the training is still easy distance at speeds much lower than actual race pace.

***
J Strength Cond Res. 2007 Aug;21(3):943-9.Links
Impact of training intensity distribution on performance in endurance athletes.

Esteve-Lanao J, Foster C, Seiler S, Lucia A.
Exercise Physiology Laboratory, European University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain. jonathan.esteve@uem.es
The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of 2 training programs differing in the relative contribution of training volume, clearly below vs. within the lactate threshold/maximal lactate steady state region on performance in endurance runners. Twelve subelite endurance runners (who are specialists in track events, mostly the 5,000-m race usually held during spring-summer months and who also participate in cross-country races [9-12 km] during fall and winter months) were randomly assigned to a training program emphasizing low-intensity (subthreshold) (Z1) or moderately high-intensity (between thresholds) (Z2) training intensities. At the start of the study, the subjects performed a maximal exercise test to determine ventilatory (VT) and respiratory compensation thresholds (RCT), which allowed training to be controlled based on heart rate during each training session over a 5-month training period. Subjects performed a simulated 10.4-km cross-country race before and after the training period. Training was quantified based on the cumulative time spent in 3 intensity zones: zone 1 (low intensity; <VT), zone 2 (moderate intensity; between VT and RCT), and zone 3 (high intensity; >RCT). The contribution of total training time spent in zones 1 and 2 was controlled to have relatively more low-intensity training in Z1 (80.5 +/- 1.8% and 11.8 +/- 2.0%, respectively) than in Z2 (66.8 +/- 1.1% and 24.7 +/- 1.5%, respectively), whereas the contribution of high-intensity (zone 3) training was similar (8.3 +/- 0.7% [Z1] and 8.5 +/- 1.0% [Z2]). The magnitude of the improvement in running performance was significantly greater (p = 0.03) in Z1 (-157 +/- 13 seconds) than in Z2 (-121.5 +/- 7.1 seconds). These results provide experimental evidence supporting the value of a relatively large percentage of low-intensity training over a long period ( approximately 5 months), provided that the contribution of high-intensity training remains sufficient.
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  #14  
Unread 07-25-2009, 10:07 PM
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Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2005 Mar;37(3):496-504. Links
How do endurance runners actually train? Relationship with competition performance.

Esteve-Lanao J, San Juan AF, Earnest CP, Foster C, Lucia A.
Exercise Physiology Laboratory, European University of Madrid, SPAIN. jonathan.esteve@fme.afd.uem.es
PURPOSE: To quantify the relationship between total training load and running performance during the most important competitions of the season (national cross-country championships, 4.175- and 10.130-km races). METHODS: Eight well-trained, subelite endurance runners (age (mean+/-SD): 23+/-2 yr; VO2max: 70.0+/-7.3 mL.kg.min) performed a maximal cardiorespiratory exercise test before the training period to determine ventilatory threshold (VT) and respiratory compensation threshold (RCT). Heart rate was continuously recorded using telemetry during each training session over a 6-month macrocycle, designed to achieve peak performance during the aforementioned cross-country races, lasting from late August to the time that these races were held, that is, mid-February. This allowed us to quantify the total cumulative time spent in three intensity zones calculated as zone 1 (low intensity, lower than the VT); zone 2 (moderate intensity, between VT and RCT); and zone 3 (high intensity, above the RCT). RESULTS: Total training time in zone 1 (4581+/-979 min) was significantly higher (P<0.001) than that accumulated in zones 2 (1354+/-583 min) and 3 (487+/-154 min). Total time in zone 2 was significantly higher than time in zone 3 (P<0.05). A correlation coefficient of r=-0.79 (P=0.06) and r=-0.97 (P=0.008) was found between the total training time spent in zone 1 and performance time during the short and long cross-country races, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that total training time spent at low intensities might be associated with improved performance during highly intense endurance events, especially if the event duration is approximately 35 min. Interventional studies (i.e., improving or reducing training time in zone 1) are needed to corroborate our findings and to elucidate the physiological mechanisms behind them.
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  #15  
Unread 07-26-2009, 12:03 PM
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Hmm I think the 3 weeks interval 4 weeks progressive distance 1 week rest model sounds feasible just need to tweak accordingly
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  #16  
Unread 07-26-2009, 12:52 PM
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4 weeks base isn't sufficient IMO
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  #17  
Unread 07-26-2009, 08:52 PM
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Very good article and very good thread. It's surprising how little most people know about how competitive athletes train most of the time. A lot of newbies to competitive fighting that I train are often shocked that you're not supposed to kill yourself on a daily basis 52 weeks out of the year in-between matches. People misguided in this regard can make a lot of really bad mistakes. Since some people (such as a friend of mine very recently) decide to try their hand out at marathons and things of the like without any idea how to train for it, this is vital info.
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  #18  
Unread 07-26-2009, 09:05 PM
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And this is not helped by the various internet gurus who promote the kind of crap like 'do intervals year round b/c low intensity work will make you fat' that ends up destroying people.
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  #19  
Unread 07-26-2009, 10:41 PM
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As for the intervals - how do you progress?
Via time based or distance based or both?
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  #20  
Unread 07-27-2009, 01:21 AM
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insread of doing blocks of intervals/ss wouldnt it be better to just do 1 day a wk on interval and the rest at steady state.
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