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  #11  
Unread 09-08-2009, 10:05 AM
eat the rich eat the rich is offline
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Hi lyle

food for thought

Build Hybrid Muscle & Burn Fat G-Flux Style!
Under Burn Fat/Fat Burning, Muscle Building Nutrition, Muscle Building/Routines, Recent Posts by Mike Westerdal

If you haven’t heard guys in the gym talking about G-Flux yet, I’m sure you will soon. What is G-Flux you ask? Although it sounds like it might be a hot new supplement, it’s not. G-Flux is actually a training and eating regimen that helps the body to burn fat while retaining—and even gaining—lean muscle mass. More accurately, G-Flux is actually the relationship between energy intake and energy expenditure. The concept of G-Flux was developed by Dr. John Berardi, a renowned human performance and nutrition expert.

You should already know that to lose weight you need to burn more calories than you take in. In the process though, most guys wind up losing lean muscle mass too—not part of the plan. On the flip side, if you want to gain weight—and muscle—you need to take in more calories than you burn. The typical scenario here is that you also end up adding a few extra pounds of unwanted fat too. Ultimately, we end up living our lives on a perpetual “see-saw,” switching from one to another, but never really being satisfied with the results. I have to admit it sucks, in the past I’ve felt either lean and weak or strong and fat.


That’s where G-Flux comes in because it’s all about balance between input and output—and keeping it that way. But that’s not all—it also calls for you to increase your calorie intake a lot and to increase your activity level by the same degree. G-Flux presents a realistic strategy to do this without overtraining and without burning lean muscle mass. That’s the problem with a traditional “calorie deficit” approach to losing fat—you also lose muscle mass along the way.

G-Flux takes a “burn the f at” approach, meaning that your body is burning calories from fat, not from muscle. How does it accomplish this? That’s where the increased activity levels come in. And by increased activity levels, I don’t mean doing a few extra minutes on the treadmill or a couple of extra miles on the exercise bike. Your approach to increasing your activity level has to be targeted, tough and purposeful, with specific goals in mind. G-Flux has unlocked the secret to achieving the body’s ideal state of balance in terms of energy input and output.

If you think about it though, “unlocked,” is not really the right word here—“rediscovered” would be more appropriate. Why? Because maximum, sustained effort and varied workouts is at the heart of the G-Flux concept. That should sound familiar—think of the warrior cultures and how they trained. It’s the same concept and we already know from history that it works. You know that back then they weren’t worried about sticking to a 2,000 calorie a-day diet—they ate what they needed to eat and it was naturally balanced out by the strenuous activities that they engaged in on a daily basis.

So you might think, “What’s the difference if I’m eating 2,000 calories a day and burning 2,000 calories a day?” The answer is that there is a big difference. When you boost your caloric intake to say 3,000 a day—and simultaneously boost your caloric expenditure level to 3,000 calories a day, the body undergoes a metabolic shift. All of sudden—even though input and output are equal—you find that your body is burning more fat and gaining lean muscle mass, just like the ancient warriors.

Now, it’s a bit more complicated than that. You can’t just start stuffing your face with anything you want and jogging a couple of extra miles each day. The foods you eat have to be healthy—think lean proteins, complex carbs and healthy fats—and the activities that you’re engaging in have to intense. Again, look back to the warrior cultures and learn from them. You want to be doing the sort of “max effort conditioning” that these guys were doing every day.

The goal is to boost your metabolism as high as possible while simultaneously limiting fat storage. When the body achieves that state of “G-Flux” it increases the mitochondrial density of the muscles—super hybrid muscle, increases the total metabolism and makes the body far more efficient at processing fat. The end result being that you too, can have a warrior physique, just like our ancestors.

Sounds good to me! Eat more, train harder, build hybrid muscle and burn fat faster. What do you think?


http://leanhybridmuscle.com/access/b...at-g-flux.html

I'm having a good look around that site, seems interesting.
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  #12  
Unread 09-08-2009, 10:07 AM
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http://leanhybridmuscle.com/access/m...ding-downloads
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  #13  
Unread 09-08-2009, 10:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eat the rich View Post
All of sudden—even though input and output are equal—you find that your body is burning more fat and gaining lean muscle mass, just like the ancient warriors.
http://leanhybridmuscle.com/access/b...at-g-flux.html
Protip: ancient warriors did not look like the dudes in 300.

Archeologists have dug up many of their skeletons. Most of them were short and squat.

And, uh, 3000 calories? No, they didn't get quite that many.

edit: also, I love the fact that, when I click on that link, they actually have a still from 300 to go along with the ad copy. el oh el

edit edit: if I have time after breakfast I may try fisking all of the ad copy, for the lulz.

Last edited by Jon : 09-08-2009 at 10:14 AM.
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  #14  
Unread 09-08-2009, 10:15 AM
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oh noes, this is even worse.

Quote:
[The English knights] were so skilled in battle that even though they were highly outnumbered by the French in the battle of Agincourt, France (1415), they not only defeated the French but only lost 200 of their own men in the battle compared to more than 8,000 Frenchmen killed.
a) no one really knows how many people were killed at Agincourt. They didn't write batallion histories back then.
b) The English knights didn't have much to do with it. The yeoman archers (and the anti-cavalry stakes they deployed), mud, and the stupidity of the French nobility and the ineffectual French commanders did much more damage to the French than the English knights did.
c) this article is very bad

Last edited by Jon : 09-08-2009 at 10:18 AM.
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  #15  
Unread 09-08-2009, 10:36 AM
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I could go all day on this site. From here:

Quote:
The world famous strength coach and owner of Westside Barbell Louie Simmons is an advocate of having his powerlifters push a weighted wheelbarrow and do sled drags. You can read about it in many of his articles.

What does this have to do with Lean Hybrid Muscle, Mike? Well, there’s a new breed of powerlifters that are taking over and they do cardio! Can you believe that, powerlifters doing cardio? Well they’re doing hybrid cardio or resistance cardio.

...

It’s true, times are a changing in the powerlifting world. Pretty soon the word powerlifter may just bring to mind a lean hybrid muscle machine instead of the stereotypical big fat bald guy with a goatee. Hybrid cardio or type III muscle training has a lot to do with it in my opinion.
yes, because before Louie Simmons there was no such thing as a lean powerlifter.
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  #16  
Unread 09-08-2009, 10:43 AM
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Last thing: PMDL or Pman or whatever he is calling himself these days already debunked the whole "super hybrid muscle" thing.
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  #17  
Unread 09-08-2009, 10:46 AM
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But is there a baby in the bathwater?

Looks like at the moment they are not giving any routines out, just playing with the idea of training in a way that favours lean gains (if it can be done).

"long strength" is not new. the warrior diet guy wrote about it, Pavel's kettlebell stuff seems a good manifestation of it.

EDT by Staley seems to fit.

And I think Lyle and his speed skating is on the spectrum.

And there's some skating in this one

http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_a..._ultimate_body

Although it may be pretty obvious nowadays, such ideas of sled draging, barbell complexes, sandbag carrying etc were unknown to many of us in the old pre internet days.

I think they are just looking at an optimal way to juggle various training modes and diet to avoid the lean but weak and the strong but fat dilemmas.

But the stuff on fibre type does sound very suspect, that I can see.

Last edited by eat the rich : 09-08-2009 at 10:58 AM.
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  #18  
Unread 09-08-2009, 10:55 AM
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work hard + don't eat too much = muscle gains without too much fat

shocking.

This has nothing to do with super hybrid type IVx muscle, or G-Flux, or tapping into the spirit of the ancient trojans, or anything else.

Their programming might be fine. I haven't seen it. But on the science, well, one word, starts with bull.
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  #19  
Unread 09-08-2009, 10:58 AM
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Part 2
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  #20  
Unread 09-08-2009, 10:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eat the rich View Post
But is there a baby in the bathwater?

Looks like at the moment they are not giving any routines out, just playing with the idea of training in a way that favours lean gains (if it can be done).

"long strength" is not new. the warrior diet guy wrote about it, Pavel's kettlebell stuff seems a good manifestation of it.

EDT by Staley seems to fit.

And I think Lyle and his speed skating is on the spectrum.

And there's some skating in this one

http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_a..._ultimate_body

Although it may be pretty obvious nowadays, such ideas of sled draging, barbell complexes, sandbag carrying etc were unknown to many of us in the old pre internet days.

I think they are just looking at an optimal way to juggle various training modes and diet to avoid the lean but weak and the strong but fat dilemmas.

But the stuff on fibre type does sound very suspect, that I can see.
Berardi's Energy Flux is goofy. It's just another way of skewing the energy balance equation: you train more and eat more. Got news for you: elite athletes still have to cut calroies to lose fat.
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