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  #1  
Unread 01-29-2010, 10:06 AM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Default Split Squat Technique

Article on the main site
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  #2  
Unread 01-29-2010, 11:25 AM
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BFLMichelle BFLMichelle is offline
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Thanks Lyle, much appreciated.
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  #3  
Unread 01-29-2010, 12:05 PM
Element Element is offline
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I would note that some lifters can use loads in the split squat that actually approach their back squat numbers, this is especially true if they actually squat to parallel or below; so the premise that a split squat automatically lightens the loads used or needed is NOT necessarily correct.
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  #4  
Unread 01-29-2010, 12:07 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Whoops. thank you
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  #5  
Unread 01-29-2010, 01:05 PM
DanceDiva DanceDiva is offline
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I'm glad you added this to the article:

Quote:
While many like to go straight from one leg to the other, I find that lifters tend to get into systemic/cardiovascular fatigue and the second leg worked always suffers for this reason (e.g. if you do 10 reps on the right leg and go straight into a set of 10 on the left, the left leg set will be impaired due to generalized fatigue). Taking a short break between legs avoids this.
I've often found when I'm in the middle of split squats or lunges I reach a point where I can feel my heart rate go up exponentially and then that's all I focus on while praying to be finished.

On the times where I actually "pause" enough to let my heart rate go down, the subsequent reps are stronger, but I always thought I shouldn't have paused. Your comment helped me to clarify that when my goal is strength-based, that I should consider fatigue in the choice I make to either rest or pick a lower weight so I am willing to continue without pause.
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  #6  
Unread 01-29-2010, 09:10 PM
shokat shokat is offline
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Question

I have done split squats with relatively light weight with the rear foot elevated on a bench. Is this an incorrect or bad variation? I have seen tons of you tube videos with that method.
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  #7  
Unread 01-29-2010, 09:30 PM
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Quote:
Of course, if you take these same types of variations to lunging, you end up with even more potential variants depending on if the lifter steps forwards, steps backwards, walks continuously, etc. All of the same basic concepts apply. As well, the back foot or front foot can be elevated on a step. A Bulgarian split squat is typically done with the back foot up on a high bench; often the hardest part of the movement is setting up with weight.
.
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  #8  
Unread 01-30-2010, 03:20 AM
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mutombo mutombo is offline
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Lyle, have you (or others) ever tried the B-Squat: http://www.ironsports.tv/bsquat.html

I've never tried it with weight myself. One thing I've found interesting about it, is it seems to be a very natural/functional way for people getting up from a low down position especially with weight (ie see the "lop-sided" pic with Bryce). It's certainly what I've done without even really thinking about it when getting up off the ground, but never realised it until after seeing the B-Squat described.
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  #9  
Unread 01-30-2010, 09:28 AM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Good way to ruin your knees IMO
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  #10  
Unread 06-26-2010, 10:39 PM
mle_ii mle_ii is offline
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Thanks for the article Lyle. I'm going to be using these as a substitue for squalts, as I seem to keep hurting my low back. Yes I know bad form, but I need to take my low back out of the picture.

Anyway, my question is I see this as replacing my squats as a leg movement but how well it work as a substitute for a deadlift? As far as the leg part, I see that going down towards the back more will help to hit the glutes and hams, but I'm wondering if I am missing out on any other parts. I can see strengthening grip will be lost, but I cannot think of anything else. I suppose for grip doing the DB version would help.

Thanks,
Mike

PS. I don't see a thread for the bench press articles. This one was a real eye opener for me.
http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/tra...-the-pecs.html
When doing what you say to do I really felt what I was actually doing in my bench presses and probably the major reason why I hurt my upper back and sometimes shoulders when doing bench presses. I felt no real chest movement, pretty much all shoulder. This will help a lot in me feeling what I'm doing for chest. Thanks again!
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