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  #21  
Unread 05-26-2010, 10:24 AM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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And that's ultimately still what it all comes down to. We can't control genetics at this point. at best the genetic testing will let folks to better specify diet/training up front and save some trial and erroring. Maybe lead to more specific pharmaceutical approaches beyond 'take this and see waht happens' and hope that a single obesity drug will work for everyone. But it will still come down to what we can control which is diet, training, supplements, etc.

Curious but where did you get the genetic testing done?
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  #22  
Unread 05-26-2010, 01:03 PM
Dave Rogerson Dave Rogerson is offline
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Yeah sure no problem,

Well I am lucky in that I teach and consult at a University in the UK, hence why I got the stuff for free. A couple of the research centers here specialize on obesity looking at genetic stuff and some behavioral stuff too (collaboratively). Their work centers on serotonin and dopamine polymorphisms.

An Australian lab called performed the tests for me (when they were initially setting up) as various markers of metabolism, insulin sensitivity, inflammation, bone density, etc, etc:

ADRB-2, PPARy2, ACE, eNOS-3, MTHFR, HIF-1, MCT-1, Col1A1, TNF alpha, IL-6, MnSOD, CYP1A1, GSTP1, GSTM1 abd GSTT1


www.excelgene.com


I was considering using the above with some people I work with but the cost implications would probably be too much, at least until I convince some of the labs here to consider performing them.

But like you say, whether any of these allelic variations actually affects you to any significant degree depends on your lifestyle anyway. I am perfect testament to that.
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  #23  
Unread 05-26-2010, 01:06 PM
Dave Rogerson Dave Rogerson is offline
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As well,

We are completely forgetting the emotional and behavioral aspects of obesity and overeating and I suspect singling out individual markers as causative factors is only one piece of much wider, more complex puzzle.
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  #24  
Unread 05-26-2010, 01:10 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Rogerson View Post
As well,

We are completely forgetting the emotional and behavioral aspects of obesity and overeating and I suspect singling out individual markers as causative factors is only one piece of much wider, more complex puzzle.
Do not disagree in the least with this. What people forget is that obesity is multi-factorial. Treatment therefore must be multi-factorial. Unfortunately, it's a field like so many where you have isolated 'experts' who have one hammer. And therefore see one nail.
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  #25  
Unread 05-27-2010, 06:54 AM
S. Al-Sabah S. Al-Sabah is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Rogerson View Post
, whether any of these allelic variations actually affects you to any significant degree depends on your lifestyle anyway. I am perfect testament to that.
That's the ultimate 'functional-assay'.
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  #26  
Unread 05-27-2010, 01:24 PM
kscarlett5683 kscarlett5683 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lylemcd View Post
And Daisygirl, as I've come to even more recognize the complete dumbfounding illiteracy of the Internet, I'm finding it more critical to really spell out what I mean. Even there, I guarantee you that someone on some forum will go "Lyle McDonald says the obese are defective". Because people are idiots.
OMG soooooo true. Dumbounding illiteracy is an excellent way of putting it.

I'm surprised you don't highlight EVERY word with a link to its dictionary meaning...but even that, unfortunately, wouldn't suffice. Ugh.
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  #27  
Unread 05-27-2010, 11:47 PM
MartyMcFly MartyMcFly is offline
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very good article series.
as a "personal/professional trainer",
this is MOSTLY the approach I am using. the part in the comments about a 250lb trainee doing walking lunges freightens me. scary. very, very scary. that sounds like i should let me 230+ 5'3" ladies do windsprints/intervals... yep i don't need em alive at all.....
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  #28  
Unread 05-28-2010, 07:09 AM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Part 3
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  #29  
Unread 05-28-2010, 10:58 AM
easyrhino easyrhino is offline
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- any hunch as to how long reprogramming mitochondria takes?
- I'm guessing the 'defect' might cause, under carb/glycogen depletion, some a skewed burning of protein vs fat, once the glucose is gone?
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  #30  
Unread 05-28-2010, 12:53 PM
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Gary the snail Gary the snail is offline
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part 3:

"So even if someone never achieves a ‘normal’ or ‘ideal’ (two very loaded words) weight or body fat percentage, that doesn’t make that act of losing at least some weight/fat or getting into regular exercise and such."

isn't there something missing in the last part of the sentence?
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