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  #21  
Unread 07-09-2010, 10:02 AM
springbody springbody is offline
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Another great article Lyle.

I came away with the impression that lbm loss is inevitable when dieting. I thought responsibly set up diets eliminated this? Or is it that they minimise it?
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  #22  
Unread 07-09-2010, 10:02 AM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Whoops again, typing too fast. Thanks.
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  #23  
Unread 07-09-2010, 10:10 AM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by springbody View Post
Another great article Lyle.

I came away with the impression that lbm loss is inevitable when dieting. I thought responsibly set up diets eliminated this? Or is it that they minimise it?
Lot of variables. I think, looking at RFL results, set up properly, LBM loss should be eliminated. I didn't mean to imply that LBm loss was inevitable in the article.
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  #24  
Unread 07-09-2010, 10:12 AM
pholt33 pholt33 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by springbody View Post
Another great article Lyle.

I came away with the impression that lbm loss is inevitable when dieting. I thought responsibly set up diets eliminated this? Or is it that they minimise it?
From the article:

Put differently, as I phrased it in The Rapid Fat Loss Handbook, if thereís a single type of exercise to do while dieting, itís proper resistance training. Coupled with an adequate protein intake, that alone tends to limit (or eliminate) lean body mass losses such that the weight which is lost (in response to the caloric deficit) comes predominantly from fat mass.
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  #25  
Unread 07-09-2010, 10:26 AM
mle_ii mle_ii is offline
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Quote:
the best diet is the on that
is the one that


Quote:
As as I mentioned
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  #26  
Unread 07-09-2010, 10:29 AM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Got 'em, thanks
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  #27  
Unread 07-09-2010, 12:21 PM
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Jean Paulo Jean Paulo is offline
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What about the effects of exercise particularly strength training doing hypertrophy scheme such as the generic bulk in nutrient partitioning? I think by increasing the intensity(weight in the bar progressively) may also be a command to partition the excess calories towards building new muscle cells? If someone is doing aerobic work, the calories may be biasedly partitioned towards conversion into heat?
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  #28  
Unread 07-10-2010, 09:25 AM
Espi Espi is offline
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In this article it is stated once again how a possible reason why people are better able to stick to a diet when they exercise is that they figure to have worked hard in the gym and they'd hate to see that work go to waste if they wouldn't eat right. Or as an opposite effect how some figure they surely have burnt a ton of calories and hence 'deserve' that pizza etc.

I've always seen over- or underetaing to be a more physiological response, to be more precisely, improved insulin sensitivity leading to less carb cravings when training in a gym. Invariably, when I stopped exercising for some reason, carb cravings would go through the roof and things would be better controlled once I'd resume training.

Does this happen to so few persons that it rarely is mentioned or what?
I'd be happy to hear thoughts from others on this particular subject.

The exception would be when too much interval training was done, which also caused overeating. Mostly delayed overeating as short-term effect was often the opposite: total loss of appetite. For extreme endurance events this effect would only stop some 48 hrs after the event, which caused me to dub it DOH (delayed onset of hunger)
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  #29  
Unread 07-10-2010, 11:20 AM
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How do you know it's more physiological than psychological, Espi, how are you making the distinction?
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  #30  
Unread 07-10-2010, 12:41 PM
Espi Espi is offline
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When speaking about the time I'd exclusively lift weights (and do some cardio) , the main driving force behind overeating was just losing control.
I'd rarely lose control when working out and would habitually lose control after 3-4 days of not working out. Things slightly improved over time and there's a thing about sulbutiamin in helping out here.

For the long endurance rides, the only psychological factor to not eat was that apart from just not having an appetite and never truly 'hitting a wall', that you ride against time & I figured I'd lose too much time when buying & eating food or even to just carry along a whole lot of it. A lot of those rides would take up to and over 24hrs. Probably the lack of appetite is a result of being in ketosis.

How it works for short-term appetite loss, you are the expert, not me.

PS: probably the entire psychology of eating right when exercising & not when not exercising mostly works for those that just work out in order to look good nekkid. Not so much when you are primarily focused on improving performance.
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Ergo-log: news & KB on legal and illegal ergogenic aids
Poliquin: "There's no overtraining , only undereating ---> to undereat, don't overtrain!"
Burgener: "There's no overtraining, only underrecovery" --> sleep, rest & recover

Last edited by Espi : 07-10-2010 at 01:12 PM.
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