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  #1  
Unread 05-04-2018, 12:35 PM
HeavyLifting145 HeavyLifting145 is offline
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Default 12-15+ Rep range

Lyle,

According to some recent studies I've come across it seems as if training in all rep ranges produces similar hypertrophy. As in, you don't just need to train in the 6-12 rep range; you could train with 12-15+ reps and still get the same results.

If this is correct, wouldn't it make sense to lift primarily in the 12-15 rep range for most exercises (maybe not squats and deadlifts) ?With this rep range the loads would be lighter, and I'm assuming it would be a little easier on the joints long term. After suffering from tennis elbow for the past 7 months it seems like this might be a good idea. Any thoughts?
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  #2  
Unread 05-04-2018, 12:39 PM
manofsteel manofsteel is offline
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From what I understand in terms of muscle hypertrophy it will produce similar results but higher rep ranges increase stamina while higher weight increase max amount you can lift.
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Unread 05-05-2018, 12:29 AM
alaloum alaloum is offline
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In for answer, I'm on my feet 15 hrs/day and when I attempted to keep lifting heavy I couldn't recover no matter how much food I had. Lifting lighter for a bit higher rep no. sounds appealing if the results are roughly the same
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  #4  
Unread 05-05-2018, 02:48 AM
manofsteel manofsteel is offline
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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27174923

"Forty-nine resistance-trained men (23 1 yr, mean SE) performed 12 wk of whole-body RT. Subjects were randomly allocated into a higher-repetition (HR) group who lifted loads of ∼30-50% of their maximal strength (1RM) for 20-25 repetitions/set (n = 24) or a lower-repetition (LR) group (∼75-90% 1RM, 8-12 repetitions/set, n = 25), with all sets being performed to volitional failure. Skeletal muscle biopsies, strength testing, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans, and acute changes in systemic hormone concentrations were examined pretraining and posttraining. In response to RT, 1RM strength increased for all exercises in both groups (P < 0.01), with only the change in bench press being significantly different between groups (HR, 9 1, vs. LR, 14 1 kg, P = 0.012). Fat- and bone-free (lean) body mass and type I and type II muscle fiber cross-sectional area increased following training (P < 0.01) with no significant differences between groups."
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Unread 05-05-2018, 03:09 AM
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zLeeKo zLeeKo is offline
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Yeah, you can do it. But it's 5x more painful since LA is accumulating quickly compared to 6-10 rep range and it's not practical on lifts that include lower back due to fatigue you'll get from such high rep ranges (compound lifts like RDL's, squats, etc).

Higher reps are good for CT health, yeah, but as you said, do them for most exercises (especially isolation), but keep at LEAST some compound sets in the slightly lower rep ranges, so you don't puke after a workout. IME, high reps are really nauseous.
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