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  #1  
Unread 02-04-2012, 05:53 PM
randyjr randyjr is offline
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Default Constant sore/fatigued quads from running?

My problem is constant and long lasting soreness/fatigue in my quads, mainly the vastus lateralis. I've debated posting this here as I have implemented many changes but still end up with excessive sore quads. I posted a question a few months ago on here about not improving in my race times mainly due to this problem, and decided to drop all races for a time and slow down my easy runs, which got me nowhere. After a hard training run, the soreness usually lasts 3-5 days and 5K's last for 4-6 days.
Without going into detail, I run 2 quality days with the rest easy/recovery. This soreness has been going on for months, probably since October or so, maybe longer. My PT says I have good form/good footstrike and my cadence is around 180 or so, maybe a little less. One interesting thing is my hams never get sore from running, ever. When I do speedwork or extended tempos, my glutes get sore and my calves do when I wear minimal shoes but these are the only muscles. I just read someone on a running website say something about beginner runners get sore quads and that's a sign of poor form. Another thread said doing squats or quad strengthening will reduce quad soreness from running. I now do a lower body workout 1-2 times a week but honestly never do quad exercises because I don't want to add to the soreness! Opinions on excessive quad soreness and how to reduce it? I've done a lot of research on the net but can't find anything concrete.
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  #2  
Unread 02-05-2012, 04:22 AM
Bonham Bonham is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randyjr View Post
My problem is constant and long lasting soreness/fatigue in my quads, mainly the vastus lateralis. I've debated posting this here as I have implemented many changes but still end up with excessive sore quads. I posted a question a few months ago on here about not improving in my race times mainly due to this problem, and decided to drop all races for a time and slow down my easy runs, which got me nowhere. After a hard training run, the soreness usually lasts 3-5 days and 5K's last for 4-6 days.
Without going into detail, I run 2 quality days with the rest easy/recovery. This soreness has been going on for months, probably since October or so, maybe longer. My PT says I have good form/good footstrike and my cadence is around 180 or so, maybe a little less. One interesting thing is my hams never get sore from running, ever. When I do speedwork or extended tempos, my glutes get sore and my calves do when I wear minimal shoes but these are the only muscles. I just read someone on a running website say something about beginner runners get sore quads and that's a sign of poor form. Another thread said doing squats or quad strengthening will reduce quad soreness from running. I now do a lower body workout 1-2 times a week but honestly never do quad exercises because I don't want to add to the soreness! Opinions on excessive quad soreness and how to reduce it? I've done a lot of research on the net but can't find anything concrete.
You have ignored almost all the advice given to you on this site (and from your doctors) so why are you back asking from more?
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  #3  
Unread 02-05-2012, 08:09 AM
FutureisNow FutureisNow is offline
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Sore quads could come about through landing on your heels.
That will force your quads to resist eccentrically. That's not neccessarily
bad form as some people do just run that way, but it could cause pain.
Try to "center" your hips over your legs - allow them to "catch up" to your legs if they are not - rather than leaning forward as I may be doing in my old photo.

Typically sore quads from exertion prevent themselves, that is to say
running downhill to bring on the soreness is recommended
in order to have immunity from recurrance. This might be able to be
done with eccentrics on a leg press as well, but running downhill
would be more directly transferable. Probably not recommended
in your case though.

You be prone to soreness from adhesions in your quads. Use a foam roller
on your quads/IT band/hip. It should be exruciating. Then stretch.
You may want to take off several days from running, to work on this.

Longer term, you had some weight loss objectives I believe that would also
help to acheive to make running easier, generally speaking.

Last edited by FutureisNow : 02-05-2012 at 08:11 AM.
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  #4  
Unread 02-05-2012, 08:39 AM
randyjr randyjr is offline
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Bonham, lol. I kind of thought you would surface so I'm going to answer your last post in a PM and don't want to get off track. I know there aren't a lot of runners on here so my replies may be few anyways but I love this site.
The first time my PT put me on a treadmill, she made the comment that I run upright too much and to lean forward at the hips more, also to look into Chi Running. The second time a few weeks later she said my posture was better and that I have a slight heel, midfoot strike which she commended saying most people heel strike. I never get shin splints and think my footstrike is good, but I guess it's possible my treadmill to outside form could be different and that my running form is off. I weigh 174, far from optimal but not enough to cause chronic quad soreness. I have been stretching and foam rolling a lot lately, and will continue. I will try and look at my outside running form today. I guess the bend at the hips with an upright body still hits the quads a lot.
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  #5  
Unread 02-05-2012, 09:54 AM
FutureisNow FutureisNow is offline
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Another thing to consider is adding short walking breaks of 30 seconds every mile or so. They will allow the blood to perfuse to your muscles, clear the
lacitic acid which makes recovery easier and could help your development.
See http://www.jeffgalloway.com/training/walk_breaks.html for more information.

This is from his blog:

Some runners assume that they must work toward the day when they don’t have to take any walk breaks at all. This is up to the individual but is not recommended. Remember that you decide what ratio of run-walk-run™ to use. There is no rule that requires you to hold to any ratio on a given day. As you adjust the run-walk according to how you feel, you gain control over your fatigue.

I’ve run for about 50 years, and I enjoy running more than ever because of walk breaks. During and after almost every run, I am energized and mentally alert. I would not be able to run almost every day if I didn’t insert the walk breaks early and often. I start most runs taking a short walk break every minute. By 2 miles, I am usually walking every 3-5 minutes. By 5 miles, the ratio often goes to every 7-10 minutes. But there are days every year when I stay at 3 minutes and even a few days at 1 minute.

The run-walk-run™ ratio that you use will vary from day to day. The more conservative you are, the more enjoyment you can expect from your running - day after day.

Last edited by FutureisNow : 02-05-2012 at 10:02 AM.
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  #6  
Unread 02-05-2012, 10:18 PM
Donald Lee Donald Lee is offline
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Is this a recent occurence? There could be something structural/postural going on...possibly in your hips.
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  #7  
Unread 02-06-2012, 09:02 PM
Zé Apelido Zé Apelido is offline
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how many times a week are you running?
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  #8  
Unread 02-06-2012, 09:25 PM
iopq iopq is offline
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try rolling one of those foam roller things on your quads
look it up, try it

I use a lacrosse ball for the same purpose
that's how I roll
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  #9  
Unread 02-06-2012, 09:47 PM
randyjr randyjr is offline
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All, please ignore Bonhams post, not sure what his problem is with me.
I plan to continue foam rolling, although I'm not real sure if it will help out. I run 5-6 days per week, with 1 or 2 quality days. I have dropped races for the last 1 1/2 months with the exception of 5K about 3 weeks ago in which I experienced completely dead quads the last 1/2 mile. I have run plenty of 5K's and towards the end of them it's always a whole body pain experience but this last 5K, I was breathing pretty good, felt alright except my quads just couldn't go anymore. The end of the race was uphill, and I lost quite some time having to slug my body up it.
As far as how long, its hard to say. It seems like sore quads has been a problem since I introduced extended harder running a year and a half ago. I know there's a point where volume and intensity come together and maybe my quads just can't handle intensity as much as others. I can easily run 8-9 miles daily at a easy pace and do great, but give me tempos or fast intervals and they fry. I've ignored this problem because I thought it was common for competitive runners, but recently realized mine was a little much after talking to some other runners. I did 2.6 miles of 10K pace intervals on Saturday, nowhere near a hard workout at all and still slightly sore to the touch tonight and can tell this will hang around for another 2 days probably, thus preventing another quality day. I've debated dropping harder running and just going back to running easy and carefree. Was much less stressful back then!

Last edited by randyjr : 02-06-2012 at 09:50 PM.
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  #10  
Unread 02-06-2012, 09:53 PM
Zé Apelido Zé Apelido is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randyjr View Post
I run 5-6 days per week, with 1 or 2 quality days.
run less

take 4-5 days off, then start running only 2-3 days a week. your legs are probably just not recovering from the amount of load you are putting them through. What's the point of running so much if it's making you worse?
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