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  #1  
Unread 11-18-2017, 04:58 PM
patriots2 patriots2 is offline
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Default Muscle Memory

How long does the muscle memory theory (lost muscle after long layoff or move to endurance training) last, making it easier to regain lost muscle than build new?

Is it a short-term phenomenon or can the effect help after like 15-years or so? Thanks.
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  #2  
Unread 11-18-2017, 05:28 PM
BigPecsPeter BigPecsPeter is offline
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I know of at least a couple of people who trained heavily in their teens (roided etc, the works), gave up completely throughout their 20s, then started again at early to mid 30s. Got muscly really really damn fast.
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  #3  
Unread 11-19-2017, 03:37 AM
Determinism Determinism is offline
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It has to do with the number of muscle cell nuclei one has gained during steroid use and/or training. Once the amount increases, it'll stay that way (nuclei will not be lost). Also there is a neural component. If you've been training a lift frequently, the pattern is more readily available in the future.
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  #4  
Unread 11-19-2017, 04:59 AM
BigPecsPeter BigPecsPeter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Determinism View Post
It has to do with the number of muscle cell nuclei one has gained during steroid use and/or training. Once the amount increases, it'll stay that way (nuclei will not be lost). Also there is a neural component. If you've been training a lift frequently, the pattern is more readily available in the future.
Can you link please to the source for that scientific explanation
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  #5  
Unread 11-19-2017, 05:05 AM
Determinism Determinism is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigPecsPeter View Post
Can you link please to the source for that scientific explanation
No.
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  #6  
Unread 11-19-2017, 06:45 AM
w1cked w1cked is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigPecsPeter View Post
Can you link please to the source for that scientific explanation
Myonuclear domain theory
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  #7  
Unread 11-19-2017, 11:14 AM
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davidjr74 davidjr74 is offline
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Can only give n=1 experience, but I have had several trials over the years of lifting consistently and than not lifting at all for years on end. I always revert back to my old strength fairly quickly in a matter of 2 months or so if I'm sticking to a consistent routine. Even cardio comes back fairly quick as well.
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  #8  
Unread 11-19-2017, 12:28 PM
AnatolyR AnatolyR is offline
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http://www.jstor.org/stable/27862202
http://www.physoc.org/press-release/...teroids-muscle
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  #9  
Unread 11-20-2017, 02:23 AM
tyler163 tyler163 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidjr74 View Post
Can only give n=1 experience, but I have had several trials over the years of lifting consistently and than not lifting at all for years on end. I always revert back to my old strength fairly quickly in a matter of 2 months or so if I'm sticking to a consistent routine. Even cardio comes back fairly quick as well.
I had similar experience. I did a lot of squat trainimg in my "speed and strenght years" than i start endurance training. Obviously squat performance drop. But in 2 month (aug sep of current year) i make a rapid strenght gain and basically right know i squat as 3 years ago (and i m 3 kg lighter). In literature there is not such a lot study about that and reasons are basically the time you have you have to spent doing the study (years) and the "clinical benefit" is vrry low.

With cardio there is more study about...basically same of the structural changes (cardiac and muscular) are not losed and basically are the "slower" changes in endurance training while enzimatic and mitocondrial seems to be the fast adaption (both in training and in detraining)
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  #10  
Unread 11-20-2017, 02:06 PM
Ironz Ironz is offline
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stating the obvious, I have noticed the effect to me much greater in body areas that gain muscle more easily in the first place. also water is wet.
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