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  #21  
Unread 11-12-2017, 09:50 AM
w1cked w1cked is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HIIT View Post
SOOOOOOO MUCH TEXT...

OVERTHINKING

Looks too complicated; if you're a noob, which you obviously are, just do Lyle's generic bulking programme or something for a few months.

JUST GET STRONGER ON A FEW KEY LIFTS (E.G. BENCH, SQUAT, WEIGHTED CHINS). When you've gotten beyond your beginner gains, most of your mass gains will link back to strength gains.
x100
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  #22  
Unread 11-12-2017, 12:56 PM
ajm587 ajm587 is offline
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Originally Posted by kc2010 View Post
Actually when I mentioned training age, I was referring not to your actual age, but to your estimation of your current status as a lifter...novice vs intermediate vs advanced...as roughly dictated by how many years of solid, intelligent training you have under your belt (among other things, of course). Doesn't have to be precise, but it can help give us a better idea of what may or may not be viable options to employ in the pursuit of continued size and strength gains.

As for volume tolerance, that can be hard to pin down...it's highly individual, can change over time due to many factors both related and unrelated to training, and can be hard to separate from other particulars of your current training program (intensity, rest periods, frequency, etc.) But in general if you're feeling reasonably rested and recovered when it comes to training particular muscle groups the next time around, you're probably tolerating the volume you're doing well enough insofar as it represents just one part of your overall program.

As to whether you'd want to increase volume when you're feeling recovered, it depends. Really the answer would be to do so only if and when you need to (in order to keep progressing). I can't say it any better than Lyle himself, so I'll quote from one of his free articles. This pertains to prematurely employing more advanced training methodology (including higher volume) than one needs to at any particular point in his or her career:



So for your benching example...if you're feeling recovered and you're progressing with the three sets, keep at it. If progress stalls but you're still feeling fine and recovered, then consider adding that additional set as one possible way to spur further progress. If progress stalls and you're feeling burnt out and run down, consider a deload of some sort or some other manner of temporary reduction in intensity and/or volume.

By the way, the quote of Lyle's is from Beginning Weight Training Part 1 (https://www.bodyrecomposition.com/mu...g-part-1.html/) If you haven't been over there to browse the free articles he's got posted, I'd highly suggest doing so. There aren't many places you can go to score free gold, but that's one of them.
So take the bench for example in the GBR, it is laid out as 3-4 x 6-8. Stick with 3 x 6-8 as long as you're progressing and feel recovered. If you stall, but still feel like you're recovering well, then add a set to make it 4 x 6-8? After that, if you progress, should you go back down to 3 x 6-8 and rinse/repeat?

Also, what would be the easiest way to progress with compounds? Straight sets then add weight once achieved? Or perhaps add weight the following session if you hit the top of the rep range in the first set but are still able to remain in the rep range for the following sets? i.e. you get 8, 7, 7 for a 3 x 6-8 you'd add weight the next session, but 8, 7, 5 you would not.
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  #23  
Unread 11-15-2017, 11:25 AM
Roger Shredderer Roger Shredderer is offline
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In the context of GBR and its volume, just stick to the same weight and try to complete the rep ranges over time with an intensity of 1-2 reps shy of failure. IMO if you go too heavy in the first few sets the whole workout is ruined and you're potentially cutting into recovery - it's just too much volume if you're going heavy twice a week.
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  #24  
Unread 11-15-2017, 01:59 PM
ajm587 ajm587 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Shredderer View Post
In the context of GBR and its volume, just stick to the same weight and try to complete the rep ranges over time with an intensity of 1-2 reps shy of failure. IMO if you go too heavy in the first few sets the whole workout is ruined and you're potentially cutting into recovery - it's just too much volume if you're going heavy twice a week.
When would be a good time to increase the weight then? Once I get all sets in the top of the rep range or once I get the top of the rep range with the first set and the following sets are still in the rep range then I would increase next session?
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  #25  
Unread 11-15-2017, 11:07 PM
Roger Shredderer Roger Shredderer is offline
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Get more reps over time with the same weight, for example if you started with 4x6, try to get 7 in the last set next time (6,6,6,7), then 7 on the 3rd set (6,6,7,7) and so on until you get 4x7. Then get 8 on the last set. Once you're doing 4x8, add 2,5% and move back to 4x6. And don't go to failure! I can't stress this enough.

Of course, there's not much difference if you add reps from the first set or from the last, but I personally like to do it that way.
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  #26  
Unread Yesterday, 01:07 AM
Determinism Determinism is online now
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Look this "don't go to failure" stuff is only relevant for big lifts (squat/deadlift). I assume you're not 70 years old and obviously you're not advanced because you ask these questions. Just overload the way you feel most comfortable with. As a beginner or early-intermediate I would even recommend overloading based on intensity rather than volume.
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