BodyRecomposition Support Forums  

Go Back   BodyRecomposition Support Forums > General information > General training questions
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Unread 09-21-2017, 11:11 PM
BEATMEOUTTAME's Avatar
BEATMEOUTTAME BEATMEOUTTAME is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 346
Default Rotator cuff

So whenever I try to bench with a normal grip I get really bad pain in my shoulders, whereas if i go out wide with the grip (to where I almost have difficulty racking the bar bc my fingers are nearly in the rack) the discomfort isnt noticeable.

I've discovered through some minor research this sounds like a weak rotator cuff issue which would make sense given my training the last year or so.

I've seen a couple videos of suggestions for rotator cuff exercises. I was wondering is this the type of thing I should be doing high reps? 3 times a week? Sets across? Only on certain workout days? I haven't found any solid recommendations.

If you have any particular links I'm interested in learning more
__________________
My Wild Ride to A great body in my 30s.

http://forums.lylemcdonald.com/showthread.php?t=23215

Thank you Lyle. This website is a game changer once you understand the mechanisms behind fat loss/muscle gain.

Spun my wheels for years prior to finding this site.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Unread 09-21-2017, 11:36 PM
squat squat is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 683
Default

I don't think you should bench press, but also you should probably quit lifting.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Unread 09-22-2017, 12:24 AM
w1cked w1cked is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,443
Default

Bulgarian split squats and fasted chinups should bring up rotator cuffs.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Unread 09-22-2017, 04:38 AM
zLeeKo's Avatar
zLeeKo zLeeKo is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Belgrade, Serbia
Posts: 490
Default

300mg of Test E in each shoulder and it should bring up the rotator cuff.
__________________
"He never had the makings of a varsity athlete"
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Unread 09-22-2017, 06:58 AM
BigPecsPeter BigPecsPeter is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 2,205
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by w1cked View Post
Bulgarian split squats and fasted chinups should bring up rotator cuffs.
+1

I heard the same
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Unread 09-22-2017, 07:39 AM
AlphaBettor AlphaBettor is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 533
Default

Check out 7 minute Rotator Cuff Solution by Jerry Robinson. I haven't read it (or if I have, I have long since forgotten about it) but have read good reviews on it.

The practical solution to your bench problem is probably to just not bench. Unless you're a powerlifter, you don't have to bench. Use dumbbells or an incline or dips or...


There are 4 rotator cuff muscles.

Supraspinatus: abduction, activated more at low abduction angles (think cable or lying/incline laterals, not standing dumbbell laterals)

Subscapularis: internal rotation

Infraspinatus and Teres minor: external rotation

There are secondary functions and all are involved in stability.

Programming recommendations, where you can find them, all over the map. A simple recommendation is 1-2 sets of L-flys 1-2x/week as most people have weak external rotators. Put them where they won't interfere with other training, e.g. at the end of upper body work where the next day is an off day or some day where you won't be working through the shoulder.

Do some cable side laterals somewhere for lateral delt hypertrophy work (also covers supraspinatus) and forget about the internal rotation part unless you really want to work the subscapularis (throw in a set here and there if you have to.)

Btw, some people work the external rotators as part of face pulls. Check out the thread I made the other day. My experiment with those has ended but they might work out better for you.

Last edited by AlphaBettor : 09-22-2017 at 07:47 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Unread 09-22-2017, 08:03 PM
BEATMEOUTTAME's Avatar
BEATMEOUTTAME BEATMEOUTTAME is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 346
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by squat View Post
I don't think you should bench press, but also you should probably quit lifting.
Giving up bench press is certainly an option that I'm considering, but I'd like to try strengthening my rotator cuff first.

With a torn pectoral muscle, bench press seems to be one of the worst exercises to resume. I certainly don't plan on going back to ~200 lbs ever again on the bench, but I feel like bringing my strength up to moderate levels will actually help me age better as well as offset any extreme muscular imbalances.

Why do you think I should quit lifting? Altogether? That seems like a questionable recommendation. I've definitely incorporated more calisthenics this year, but I'm only 35 and not quite ready to give it up altogether.
__________________
My Wild Ride to A great body in my 30s.

http://forums.lylemcdonald.com/showthread.php?t=23215

Thank you Lyle. This website is a game changer once you understand the mechanisms behind fat loss/muscle gain.

Spun my wheels for years prior to finding this site.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Unread 09-22-2017, 08:04 PM
BEATMEOUTTAME's Avatar
BEATMEOUTTAME BEATMEOUTTAME is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 346
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by w1cked View Post
Bulgarian split squats and fasted chinups should bring up rotator cuffs.
Good one, always cool to derail threads
__________________
My Wild Ride to A great body in my 30s.

http://forums.lylemcdonald.com/showthread.php?t=23215

Thank you Lyle. This website is a game changer once you understand the mechanisms behind fat loss/muscle gain.

Spun my wheels for years prior to finding this site.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Unread 09-22-2017, 08:06 PM
BEATMEOUTTAME's Avatar
BEATMEOUTTAME BEATMEOUTTAME is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 346
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlphaBettor View Post
Check out 7 minute Rotator Cuff Solution by Jerry Robinson. I haven't read it (or if I have, I have long since forgotten about it) but have read good reviews on it.

The practical solution to your bench problem is probably to just not bench. Unless you're a powerlifter, you don't have to bench. Use dumbbells or an incline or dips or...


There are 4 rotator cuff muscles.

Supraspinatus: abduction, activated more at low abduction angles (think cable or lying/incline laterals, not standing dumbbell laterals)

Subscapularis: internal rotation

Infraspinatus and Teres minor: external rotation

There are secondary functions and all are involved in stability.

Programming recommendations, where you can find them, all over the map. A simple recommendation is 1-2 sets of L-flys 1-2x/week as most people have weak external rotators. Put them where they won't interfere with other training, e.g. at the end of upper body work where the next day is an off day or some day where you won't be working through the shoulder.

Do some cable side laterals somewhere for lateral delt hypertrophy work (also covers supraspinatus) and forget about the internal rotation part unless you really want to work the subscapularis (throw in a set here and there if you have to.)

Btw, some people work the external rotators as part of face pulls. Check out the thread I made the other day. My experiment with those has ended but they might work out better for you.
Thank you will give all of this a run through. I'd really like to bring them up to speed because I've had several friends tear rotator cuffs and I'm not interested in doing it myself
__________________
My Wild Ride to A great body in my 30s.

http://forums.lylemcdonald.com/showthread.php?t=23215

Thank you Lyle. This website is a game changer once you understand the mechanisms behind fat loss/muscle gain.

Spun my wheels for years prior to finding this site.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Unread 09-22-2017, 10:50 PM
squat squat is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 683
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BEATMEOUTTAME View Post
Giving up bench press is certainly an option that I'm considering, but I'd like to try strengthening my rotator cuff first.

With a torn pectoral muscle, bench press seems to be one of the worst exercises to resume. I certainly don't plan on going back to ~200 lbs ever again on the bench, but I feel like bringing my strength up to moderate levels will actually help me age better as well as offset any extreme muscular imbalances.

Why do you think I should quit lifting? Altogether? That seems like a questionable recommendation. I've definitely incorporated more calisthenics this year, but I'm only 35 and not quite ready to give it up altogether.
I was just kidding. Except you don't seem to be doing very well at lifting. Lots of people don't lift and live happy lives and look great, but I'm better than that. There might be a more fitting fitness fixation for you.

Bench press is pretty hard. Lots of people get hurt. It kind of hurts me, but I take it easy, and I have no major issues. No need to bench. There is no need. You'll never be competitive. Choose something kinder to you, so you can compete with yourself and not lose to your shoulders.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:13 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.