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  #1  
Unread 10-18-2017, 01:24 PM
alexz1993 alexz1993 is offline
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Posts: 10
Default Is my routine bad ?

I'm currently doing this routine. (PPL + UL) 5 days a week. Trying each muscules 2 times a week

Should I change something? Abandon it and do another routine? I was thinking of doing Lyle McDonald routine ? Still not sure.

What do you guys think ?


Push Day:
Incline BB Bench Press, 3 Sets, 6-10 reps
Flat DB Bench Press, 3 Sets, 8-10 reps
Machine Fly, 2 sets 8-12 reps
DB Shoulder Press, 3 Sets, 6-10 reps
Side Laterals, 3 Sets, 8-12 reps
Tricep Dips (Heavy), 3 Sets, 5-8 reps

Pull Day:
Pull Ups, 3 Sets, 8-12 reps
Bent Over Barbell Row, 3 Sets, 6-10 reps
One Arm Bent Over Rows, 2 Sets, 8-12 reps
Barbell Curl , 3 Sets, 5-8 reps

Leg Day:
Squats (Heavy), 3 Sets, 3-5 reps
Deadlifts, 3 Sets, 6-10 reps
Leg Extensions, 3 Sets, 6-10 reps
Leg Curls, 3 Sets, 8-12 reps
Calf Raises, 3 Sets, 8-12 reps

Upper Body:
Flat Bench (Heavy), 3 Sets, 3-5 reps
Pull ups, 3 Sets, 6-10 reps
Incline DB press, 2 Sets, 6-10 reps
One Arm DB Rows, 2 Sets, 6-10 reps
Standing OHP (Heavy), 3 Sets, 3-5 reps
Hammer Curls (Light), 3 Sets, 8-12 reps
Skullcrushers (Light), 3 Sets, 8-12 reps

Lower Body:
Deadlifts (Heavy), 3 Sets, 3-5 reps
Squats, 3 Sets, 6-10 reps
Leg Curls, 3 Sets, 6-10 reps
Leg Extensions, 3 Sets, 8-12 reps
Calf Raises, 3 Sets, 8-12 reps
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  #2  
Unread 10-18-2017, 02:50 PM
LightCrow LightCrow is offline
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A few things I see you might think about:

1. The Push day has a lot of tricep work indirectly. I would do something more isolation for a more fatigue stimulus for a lot higher reps for your direct exercise. like 1-2 sets of 12-15 reps.
2. Barbell curls that low in reps can really lead to form breakdown and working everything but biceps. Your call, but again same comments ask triceps since they get plenty of heavy work before this with the compounds.
3. Deadlifting 2x per week if you're using any decent amount of weight could be a problem. I would squat one workout and then deadlift the next, not do both each day due to lower back fatigue.
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  #3  
Unread 10-18-2017, 05:06 PM
alexz1993 alexz1993 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LightCrow View Post
A few things I see you might think about:

1. The Push day has a lot of tricep work indirectly. I would do something more isolation for a more fatigue stimulus for a lot higher reps for your direct exercise. like 1-2 sets of 12-15 reps.
2. Barbell curls that low in reps can really lead to form breakdown and working everything but biceps. Your call, but again same comments ask triceps since they get plenty of heavy work before this with the compounds.
3. Deadlifting 2x per week if you're using any decent amount of weight could be a problem. I would squat one workout and then deadlift the next, not do both each day due to lower back fatigue.
Thanks for the tips !

So if I replace the Dips in Push day for Tricep Extension 2 sets of 12-15 reps

And if I replace Barbell curls for 8-12 rep range instead of low rep range.

And if I do like you said Deadlift a day and Squat the other day.

Would it be a good routine? Or I'm better off with a Standard Upper/Lower routine ?

Also, my Pull day seems a bit low on sets, It takes a lot less time to do than the Push day, is that a problem?
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  #4  
Unread 10-19-2017, 09:26 AM
kc2010 kc2010 is offline
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I'm not sure I'd worry too much about the number of sets on your pull day. Looking at your set and rep scheme, you're hitting the back with anywhere from 58 to 90 reps. Probably fine to start, but not knowing your training age and volume tolerance, it's hard to say. Run it for a while and see how you feel. Personally I wouldn't add more (without trying this first) and I wouldn't worry about it taking less time than your push day. Gives you more time to live other parts of your life.

In concert with increasing BB curl rep range to 8 to 12, you could consider dropping from three sets to two. You're getting essentially the same rep count (3 x 5-8 gives you 14 to 24, while 2 x 8-12 gives you 16 to 24).
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  #5  
Unread 10-19-2017, 01:25 PM
alexz1993 alexz1993 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kc2010 View Post
I'm not sure I'd worry too much about the number of sets on your pull day. Looking at your set and rep scheme, you're hitting the back with anywhere from 58 to 90 reps. Probably fine to start, but not knowing your training age and volume tolerance, it's hard to say. Run it for a while and see how you feel. Personally I wouldn't add more (without trying this first) and I wouldn't worry about it taking less time than your push day. Gives you more time to live other parts of your life.

In concert with increasing BB curl rep range to 8 to 12, you could consider dropping from three sets to two. You're getting essentially the same rep count (3 x 5-8 gives you 14 to 24, while 2 x 8-12 gives you 16 to 24).
Thanks I will change it to 2x 8-12 seems like a good idea. And for age and volume tolerance: I'm 25 years old, but about volume tolerance I have no idea how to figure this out. Does it mean if I'm not exhausted during the week because of my workouts I should increase the volume? Let's say 4 sets of benching instead of 3 ?

Also, Should I keep the dips or just do tricep extension or another tricep exercice instead ?
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  #6  
Unread 10-19-2017, 02:05 PM
LightCrow LightCrow is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alexz1993 View Post
Thanks I will change it to 2x 8-12 seems like a good idea. And for age and volume tolerance: I'm 25 years old, but about volume tolerance I have no idea how to figure this out. Does it mean if I'm not exhausted during the week because of my workouts I should increase the volume? Let's say 4 sets of benching instead of 3 ?

Also, Should I keep the dips or just do tricep extension or another tricep exercice instead ?
I'm a big fan of Lyle's generic bulking routine. I've built most of my size from it. If you're not sure of your volume tolerance I would probably choose to start there if I were in your shoes. From there you could think about increasing volume with a 5th day if you felt it was needed. It's honestly the best baseline building routine for an intermediate over anything else out there. You'll learn a lot about how your body responds to evolve from there if you choose.

On your current routine I would drop dips for extensions.
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  #7  
Unread 10-19-2017, 02:59 PM
HeavyLifting145 HeavyLifting145 is offline
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I agree with some of the modifications. Squats and deads on the same day is no good. I wouldn't drop the arm work though from 3 sets to 2. I would keep it 3 sets and do 8-15 reps, a little higher on the volume side.

In terms of which routine to do.. I think it depends.. I had some of my best gains on a UL+PPL split. The advantage is the training days are a little less volume because you have 5 days vs 4 to fit in everything. So, if you need a little more volume, and like training 5 days a week I would go for that.
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  #8  
Unread 10-20-2017, 01:07 PM
kc2010 kc2010 is offline
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Quote:
Thanks I will change it to 2x 8-12 seems like a good idea. And for age and volume tolerance: I'm 25 years old, but about volume tolerance I have no idea how to figure this out. Does it mean if I'm not exhausted during the week because of my workouts I should increase the volume? Let's say 4 sets of benching instead of 3 ?

Also, Should I keep the dips or just do tricep extension or another tricep exercice instead ?
Actually when I mentioned training age, I was referring not to your actual age, but to your estimation of your current status as a lifter...novice vs intermediate vs advanced...as roughly dictated by how many years of solid, intelligent training you have under your belt (among other things, of course). Doesn't have to be precise, but it can help give us a better idea of what may or may not be viable options to employ in the pursuit of continued size and strength gains.

As for volume tolerance, that can be hard to pin down...it's highly individual, can change over time due to many factors both related and unrelated to training, and can be hard to separate from other particulars of your current training program (intensity, rest periods, frequency, etc.) But in general if you're feeling reasonably rested and recovered when it comes to training particular muscle groups the next time around, you're probably tolerating the volume you're doing well enough insofar as it represents just one part of your overall program.

As to whether you'd want to increase volume when you're feeling recovered, it depends. Really the answer would be to do so only if and when you need to (in order to keep progressing). I can't say it any better than Lyle himself, so I'll quote from one of his free articles. This pertains to prematurely employing more advanced training methodology (including higher volume) than one needs to at any particular point in his or her career:

Quote:
Not only is this not terribly productive, it can actually be detrimental to long-term progress. Even if the person doesn’t get injured or burned out by doing too much too soon, they run into another big problem: by using advanced methods early on, trainees are limited when they do manage to reach a more advanced stage. That is, if someone jumps into high volumes or advanced training methods right out of the gate, they run into problems later on when they actually need to increase something. If volume is already high, increasing it further is difficult if not impossible. And if advanced methods are being used too early, there’s nothing left to break plateaus when they occur later on

Put a little bit differently, one goal of all training should always be to get the most adaptations/gains in performance with the least amount of training. That way, when gains slow down, there is actually room to increase things. Start too high to begin with and you’ve got nowhere to go when you actually need to do it.

Put a bit differently, if you can get the same gains out of 3 hours/week of training vs. 6 hours/week of training, you’re better off training 3 hours/week. That way, when 3 hours/week stops working, you have room to increase to 4 hours/week then 5 hours/week then 6 hours/week. If you start at 6 hours/week and stop progressing, you’ve got nowhere left to go.
So for your benching example...if you're feeling recovered and you're progressing with the three sets, keep at it. If progress stalls but you're still feeling fine and recovered, then consider adding that additional set as one possible way to spur further progress. If progress stalls and you're feeling burnt out and run down, consider a deload of some sort or some other manner of temporary reduction in intensity and/or volume.

By the way, the quote of Lyle's is from Beginning Weight Training Part 1 (https://www.bodyrecomposition.com/mu...g-part-1.html/) If you haven't been over there to browse the free articles he's got posted, I'd highly suggest doing so. There aren't many places you can go to score free gold, but that's one of them.
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  #9  
Unread 10-20-2017, 01:10 PM
kc2010 kc2010 is offline
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Quote:
On your current routine I would drop dips for extensions.
In light of the overall set up on push day, that'd be my inclination as well.
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  #10  
Unread 10-21-2017, 02:03 PM
alexz1993 alexz1993 is offline
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Thanks a lot for the answer. Thats what I will do, and I will try Lyle routine next.

to answer the question : I have been lifting for a year and few months so far, so I'm not that experienced yet too

Also I have another question: Is PPL a good way to workout (6 days a week)? or it's stupid and too much volume for the average person ?

Upper Lower > PPL ?

on website like bodybuilding people seem to say PPL is one of the best, but it seems a bit much to me
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