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  #11  
Unread 06-07-2010, 11:47 AM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Have you read an iota of the research on this topic?
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  #12  
Unread 06-07-2010, 06:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PlankIt View Post
10 years ago, though?
From my understanding he gained the weight when he took the medication, his issue now is that he is having trouble losing it.
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  #13  
Unread 06-07-2010, 06:17 PM
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Originally Posted by BillRempel View Post
I'm not putting a check there on #5. Betting there's a natural diet & exercise modification/protocol that'll help with the bodyfat, and betting that those on the site will work.
He is talking about atypical antipsychotics, which DO have metabolic effects, and yes that would effect weight gain and loss.

I suggest you do a little research before you make such opinions.
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  #14  
Unread 06-07-2010, 06:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillRempel View Post
I

It just seemed to me that the majority of the responses were overlooking this simple point.

.
have you even read the responses?
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  #15  
Unread 06-07-2010, 06:38 PM
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hazeldazel hazeldazel is offline
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to the OP, are you on Depakote? I am on this med but in my case it is for seizures (it's also prescribed a lot for bipolar). From what I've read the average weight gain is 60 pounds. While I did gain a lot of weight after going on it, I have been able to lose about 60 pounds in the last year and a half. It's going slowly but surely, just don't give up!
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  #16  
Unread 06-07-2010, 07:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillRempel View Post
1. altering calorie partitioning, check
2. altering metabolism levels, check
3. altering fat storage pattern e.g. visceral Vs. subq, check
4. altering water retention levels, check
5. altering the law of thermodynamics???

I'm not putting a check there on #5. Betting there's a natural diet & exercise modification/protocol that'll help with the bodyfat, and betting that those on the site will work.
A typical Antipsychotic Induced Weight Gain: Pathophysiology and Management

Authors: Jambur Anantha; Ravi Venkatesha; Karl Burgoynea; Rangaesh Gadasallia; Robert Binforda; Sarath Gunatilakeb
Affiliations: a University of California, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, Torrance, California, USA
b Metropolitan State Hospital, Norwalk, California, USA
DOI: 10.1080/10401230490453293
Publication Frequency: 4 issues per year
Published in: Annals of Clinical Psychiatry, Volume 16, Issue 2 April 2004 , pages 75 - 85
Subjects: Psychiatry; Psychiatry & Clinical Psychology - Adult;
Number of References: 131
Formats available: HTML (English) : PDF (English)
The circumstances under which this title is published have changed:

Reason for change: Changed Publisher
Now published by: Dowden Health Media
Single Article Purchase: US$43.00 - buy now add to cart
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Download PDF (~151 KB) View Article Online (HTML)

Abstract

There is compelling evidence that patients with schizophrenia are prone to gain weight. In addition, atypical antipsychotic (AAP) drugs also induce weight gain. All antipsychotic drugs produce weight gain but the potential varies. Many studies overwhelmingly confirm that AAP drugs produce substantially more weight gain in comparison to conventional antipsychotic drugs. Clozapine and olanzapine have the most weight inducing potential. Even ziprasidone, which is considered to be weight neutral, and aripiprazole a dopamine modulator produce weight gain in some. The pathophysiology of weight gain is complicated. Many neurohormones, neuropeptides, gut hormones, as well as adipose tissue and hair root derived hormones interact with environmental factors to produce weight gain. Management of weight gain is a difficult problem. Basic to treatment is an understanding of the etiology. Drug induced obesity provides a unique opportunity to psychiatrists to understand this clinically important problem. In the absence of this knowledge, prevention is the best hope. Education, diet control and simple behavioral measures may prevent excessive weight gain. In those with weight gain, treatment can be attempted with pharmacotherapy with careful monitoring of the side effects.
Keywords: Atypical antipsychotic induced weight gain; Weight gain and drugs; Management of drug-induced weight gain; Pathophysiology of weight gain; Schizophrenia and weight gain
view references (131) : view citations

J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 Apr;66(4):504-14.
Atypical antipsychotics and glucose homeostasis.
Bergman RN, Ader M.

Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. rbergman@usc.edu
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Persistent reports have linked atypical antipsychotics with diabetes, yet causative mechanisms responsible for this linkage are unclear. Goals of this review are to outline the pathogenesis of nonimmune diabetes and to survey the available literature related to why antipsychotics may lead to this disease. DATA SOURCES: We accessed the literature regarding atypical antipsychotics and glucose homeostasis using PubMed. The search included English-language publications from 1990 through October 2004. Keywords used included atypical antipsychotics plus one of the following: glucose, insulin, glucose tolerance, obesity, or diabetes. In addition, we culled information from published abstracts from several national and international scientific meetings for the years 2001 through 2004, including the American Diabetes Association, the International Congress on Schizophrenia Research, and the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. The latter search was necessary because of the paucity of well-controlled prospective studies. STUDY SELECTION: We examined publications with significant new data or publications that contributed to the overall comprehension of the impact of atypical antipsychotics on glucose metabolism. We favored original peer-reviewed articles and were less likely to cite single case studies and/or anecdotal information. Approximately 75% of the fewer than 150 identified articles were examined and included in this review. DATA EXTRACTION: Validity of data was evaluated using the existence of peer-review status as well as our own experience with methodology described in the specific articles. DATA SYNTHESIS: The metabolic profile caused by atypical antipsychotic treatment resembles type 2 diabetes. These agents cause weight gain in treated subjects and may induce obesity in both visceral and subcutaneous depots, as occurs in diabetes. Insulin resistance, usually associated with obesity, occurs to varying degrees with different antipsychotics, although more comparative studies with direct assessment of resistance are needed. A major problem in assessing drug effects is that psychiatric disease itself can cause many of the manifestations leading to diabetes, including weight gain and sedentary lifestyle. While studies in healthy subjects are limited and inconclusive, studies in animal models are more revealing. In the conscious canine model, some atypical antipsychotics cause adiposity, including visceral obesity, a strong risk factor for the metabolic syndrome. Furthermore, while few studies have examined effects of antipsychotics on pancreatic beta-cell function, canine studies demonstrate that expected beta-cell compensation for insulin resistance may be reduced or even eliminated with these agents. CONCLUSIONS: Atypical antipsychotics have been shown to contribute to weight gain, which may well reflect increased body fat deposition. Such increased fat is known to cause resistance to insulin action, although more information regarding effect on insulin action is needed. The effect of these drugs on fat distribution has been clearly shown in animal models. It is known that the normal response to insulin resistance is compensatory hyperinsulinemia, which may prevent diabetes. In animals, there is evidence that the hyperinsulinemic compensation is inadequate in the face of atypical antipsychotic agents. It remains to be examined whether failure of adequate pancreatic beta-cell compensation for insulin resistance plays a central role in the pathogenesis of diabetes associated with this class of drugs.


Antipsychotic-Induced Weight Gain: A Comprehensive Research Synthesis

David B. Allison, Ph.D., Janet L. Mentore, M.S.Ed., Moonseong Heo, Ph.D., Linda P. Chandler, Ph.D., Joseph C. Cappelleri, Ph.D., M.P.H., Ming C. Infante, M.S., and Peter J. Weiden, M.D.

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to estimate and compare the effects of antiI need to read the rules post.psychotics—both the newer ones and the conventional ones—on body weight. METHOD: A comprehensive literature search identified 81 English- and non-English-language articles that included data on weight change in antipsychotic-treated patients. For each agent, a meta-analysis and random effects metaregression estimated the weight change after 10 weeks of treatment at a standard dose. A comprehensive narrative review was also conducted on all articles that did not yield quantitative information but did yield important qualitative information. RESULTS: Placebo was associated with a mean weight reduction of 0.74 kg. Among conventional agents, mean weight change ranged from a reduction of 0.39 kg with molindone to an increase of 3.19 kg with thioridazine. Among newer antipsychotic agents, mean increases were as follows: clozapine, 4.45 kg; olanzapine, 4.15 kg; sertindole, 2.92 kg; risperidone, 2.10 kg; and ziprasidone, 0.04 kg. Insufficient data were available to evaluate quetiapine at 10 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: Both conventional and newer anti psychotics are associated with weight gain. Among the newer agents, clozapine appears to have the greatest potential to induce weight gain, and ziprasidone the least. The differences among newer agents may affect compliance with medication and health risk.

https://www.thieme-connect.com/ejour...5/s-2002-36391
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  #17  
Unread 06-08-2010, 07:46 AM
rlee rlee is offline
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great info morgan! can't believe i thought it was so black and white, weight gain effects were due to 5ht and D effects in the brain leading to changes in appetite hence weight gain! At the same time, i can't help but follow bills logic, i.e. starve enough and you'll start losing weight.

Interesting though... and just some speculation from my part: just by treating the mania itself probably induces some level of weight gain, possibly due to decreased activity levels, increased sleep but no adjustment to caloric intake because the patient has become accustomed to it... probably not significant, but another factor in the web.
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  #18  
Unread 06-08-2010, 07:55 AM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Sure, it's still thermodynamics but the entire system is biased towards increasing appetite and putting hte calories somewhere negative (negative calorie partitioning). I've had a client or two on the drugs, they make progress neigh impossible. And there are newer drugs that treat the disease without the metabolic negatives.
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  #19  
Unread 06-08-2010, 08:23 AM
zariel zariel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazeldazel View Post
to the OP, are you on Depakote? I am on this med but in my case it is for seizures (it's also prescribed a lot for bipolar). From what I've read the average weight gain is 60 pounds. While I did gain a lot of weight after going on it, I have been able to lose about 60 pounds in the last year and a half. It's going slowly but surely, just don't give up!
Yeah, if I can remember right (it's been 10 years) I think it probably was Depakote. I know at one time I was on it, whether it was the "one," I'm not positive. Right now I'm on Abilify, and I'm probably one of the very few who has had absolutely no noticeable side effects and full benefits. I've also been on it since it was first available to buy (back when they really didn't know all the side effects), and I've done well ever since. Sometimes I feel like the "meds game" is like playing roulette, you never know what you're going to get.

As for my calorie tracking, I don't have a formal system, but I am very aware of what I eat. Mainly what I am asking is that even with genetics predisposing me to be lean, is it still possible for me to struggle both psychologically and physiologically as a side effect from that medication? Disregarding the fact that 50 pounds is generally hard for anyone to lose.

I'm on the track to losing it, but it's a terribly slow process (years in the making), and yes I'll definitively be checking on my blood sugar levels as per recommendation.

Thanks for the advice guys, I hope this thread will help anyone else with the same questions.
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  #20  
Unread 06-08-2010, 12:48 PM
ketogym ketogym is offline
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Quote:
A typical Antipsychotic Induced Weight Gain: Pathophysiology and Management
Is there any info on citalopram, is it classified as one of these. thanks.

Last edited by ketogym : 06-08-2010 at 12:51 PM.
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