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  #1  
Unread 04-18-2008, 04:44 PM
CZa CZa is offline
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Default Monounsaturated Fats

So EFAs include omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fats, but I keep seeing studies that show diets rich in monounsaturated fats can help raise anabolic hormone levels.

Is this just a side effect of a higher consumption of EFAs due to increased ingestion of foods like canola oil which has a lot of monounsaturated fat but also a decent amount of EFAs?
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Unread 04-19-2008, 04:28 AM
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More dietary fat -> more cholesterol* -> more progesterone (men & women) -> more testosterone (men) or oestrogen/estradiol (women)

See http://www.cholesterol-and-health.co...olesterol.html and http://www.cholesterol-and-health.co...-Hormones.html

*Cholesterol production & serum cholesterol levels do not necessarily correlate.
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Last edited by Nigeepoo : 04-19-2008 at 04:32 AM.
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  #3  
Unread 04-19-2008, 10:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nigeepoo View Post
More dietary fat -> more cholesterol*
That's where I'm having trouble.

Does it? Why does increased cholesterol dietary intake not do the same thing?
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Unread 04-19-2008, 01:06 PM
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cholesterol is rarely the rate limiting step for hormone production so taht's unlikely to be the mechanism.

studies show that a higher fat intake (and usually sat fat is the big correlate) tends to correlate with higher testosteroe levels. other work shows that there is a concommitant increase in SHBG so the effect on free test may be negligble
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Unread 04-20-2008, 12:31 PM
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Originally Posted by lylemcd View Post
studies show that a higher fat intake (and usually sat fat is the big correlate) tends to correlate with higher testosteroe levels. other work shows that there is a concommitant increase in SHBG so the effect on free test may be negligble
The studies I've seen show monounsaturated fats primarily and saturated fats secondarily lead to increased testosterone levels.

Either way, if it leads to increased SHBG like you said it's a wash anyway.

So what are the health benefits of monounsaturated fats, then (and I mean stuff deeper than '9 calories per gram' and/or 'no increase in insulin').
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Unread 04-20-2008, 01:38 PM
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something to do with arterial flexibility as I recall

one problem with a lot of the work on fat and testosterone has to do with hte way the studies are done, I'd note

whenever you change one nutrient, to keep calories the same, you ahve to change something else and this can skew the results

so say you've got somene on 2000 calories

if protein is fixed and you raise fat, carbs come down. is it the increase in fat, the decrease in carbs, some change in the ratio of nutrients?

I bring up the last one becuase one study (never mentioned in the bodybuilding world that loves to talk about fat) found that higher carbrotein ratio (e.g. lower protein relative to carbs) increased testosterone

higher insulin also unbinds SHBG so that might mean more free testosterone

then again, at the end of the day, small changes in hormones like this are unlikely to have major effects on anything. it takes pretty large scales changes in testoterone (e.g. via drugs) to impact much

a few percentage points here and there just isn't that valid
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