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  #41  
Unread 09-27-2009, 12:23 PM
Spinola25 Spinola25 is offline
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My gym has got a Cybex rotary calf machine, like so. Instructions are to keep the knees slightly bent, keep the feet on the gas-pedal-like footrest with the toes more or less on the top edge, and go through a full range of motion.

I find it tricky to get a good feel of the calf being worked; I cut down to 130lbs from an initial 150lbs when I started doing them, but even so I worry about either the legs moving - it's hard to keep them totally uninvolved when they're sitting there at a 175 degree angle in open space - or else my foot and toes feeling like they're under a bunch of pressure and maybe also doing some work.

I'm thinking the downstairs (macho) free-weight/bench/smith-machine area has a seated calf machine but I'm guessing from the writeup that the one I've got is actually better.

I'm thinking - assuming the machine is what I want - I'll maybe maybe move my toes further up above the pedal (to get rid of distracting/cheating foot involvement) and straighten my legs as far as I can without locking them - which wouldn't be much of a difference from now - to cut out help from above the calfs. If that still doesn't work maybe the weight's inappropriate.

Last edited by Spinola25 : 09-27-2009 at 12:24 PM. Reason: added link to machine
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  #42  
Unread 09-30-2009, 04:25 AM
toiletmoose toiletmoose is offline
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Lyle, got a question. Been following the routine in the article, and for the straight legged exercises, where on the foot should one be 'feeling the weight'.

Right now, with straight legs, I find that I feel the weight somewhat on the inside of the foot near the toe, and slowly migrates to the outside of the foot as I fatigue, but I dunno if its because the soleus is taking over the load or some other crap since I can't really feel the difference between using the gastroc vs solues (if that's possible). I'm pretty sure my legs are dead straight and tempo is as you laid out in the article.

Is this a sign of a weight that is too heavy? Or should I simply ignore it and keep pushing the weight up once I can hit 5x5? I have made some decent progress in terms of weight used, but its only been 6 weeks so its hard to tell if its just neutral gains.
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  #43  
Unread 09-30-2009, 08:27 AM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Best *guess*, you're rolling your weight a bit trying to find 'fresh muscle' as you get tired (e.g. different parts of the gastroc). I don't think it indicates anything about stress on one muscle vs. another.
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  #44  
Unread 09-30-2009, 04:30 PM
toiletmoose toiletmoose is offline
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Alright then, thanks for the clarification and I'll continue with the program to get monster calves.
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  #45  
Unread 10-02-2009, 10:33 AM
Spinola25 Spinola25 is offline
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I'm a bit curious on the knee locking warnings on my gym's weight machines and how they apply to calves.

I get why the leg press machine has a warning not to lock knees; I'm a bit less clear why the inclined rotary calf machine does. My old gym's standing calf raise obviously involved straight legs, as do some other calf exercises, and stuff I see on (sorry) the internet seems to suggest that using a leg press to do calf raises starts with "locking your knees."

Is there any reason I can't fully straighten my legs - avoiding backwards flexion obviously - with the relatively light weights used for calves? I'd prefer to if it's safe.
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  #46  
Unread 10-02-2009, 10:39 AM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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It's called CYA. There is this weird tiny concern that locking the knees under load can cause hyperextension and injury. Even on leg press, I've never seen it happen in nearly 20 years. Of course, all it takes is that one person with hypermobile knees to get into problems and.....

But any time there is even the slightest risk, given teh sue-happy nature of the US, they have to put warnings like that.
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  #47  
Unread 10-02-2009, 10:55 AM
Spinola25 Spinola25 is offline
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Figured, thanks.
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  #48  
Unread 10-11-2009, 03:34 PM
Spinola25 Spinola25 is offline
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Much simpler to feel the calves now, and at a considerably higher weight than I'd been fiddling with while trying to keep my leg from moving.
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  #49  
Unread 02-11-2010, 03:27 PM
toiletmoose toiletmoose is offline
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Bumping this thread with another question.

I've been moving around lately, and one of the consequences is that my gym no longer has a calf raise machine. I've basically switched over to single leg calf raises on a calf block while holding a DB.

I can still feel my calves working like hell, but when my heel approaches about 40 degrees above parallel to the ground, I start to feel lotsa instability and tension in the joints and tendons of the ankle. It becomes a bigger issue as reps go down.

So the question is, is there any long term detriment in terms of muscular development by only raising the heel up to that point instead of going as far as the joint allows? Thanks.
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  #50  
Unread 02-11-2010, 03:32 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Just eyeballing it here at hte computer, full extension doesn't seem to be much higher than that (using the ball of the foot as zero adn the heel position at hte top. Maybe 45 but I'm not breaking out the compass.

I wonder if you're not trying to go up en pointe or something.

Do you have a pre-existing ankle injury?
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