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  #1  
Unread 11-21-2013, 01:32 PM
sizeon sizeon is offline
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Default Question about slow dieting

Is it wise to lower calorie intake to lose 2 lbs a week instead of 1 lbs a week? The reason why i ask is because my weight lost has been very slow (1 lbs a week) even though i took two weeks to eat at a slight surplus of calories.

P.S. I have been dieting for four months.
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  #2  
Unread 11-21-2013, 03:18 PM
Txomin Txomin is offline
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The math is not bad (if you have lost 16 pounds). Congrats.

But, sure, you can create a greater deficit. Don't go nuts, though. This is working for you. Slow is better than not at all and, for some people (me), slow is preferable.
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  #3  
Unread 11-24-2013, 11:47 AM
Chetan Barokar Chetan Barokar is offline
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If you are in the range of 15% bodyfat, you can create greater caloric deficit and lose in the range of 2lbs/week without risking muscle loss. If you are approaching single digit bodyfat and you are natural, then slow fat loss would ensure zero or minimum muscle loss. RFL would make you lose in the range of 2lbs/week or more generally. What is your current fat percentage, diet protocol?

Last edited by Chetan Barokar : 11-24-2013 at 11:49 AM.
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  #4  
Unread 11-24-2013, 01:36 PM
sizeon sizeon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chetan Barokar View Post
If you are in the range of 15% bodyfat, you can create greater caloric deficit and lose in the range of 2lbs/week without risking muscle loss. If you are approaching single digit bodyfat and you are natural, then slow fat loss would ensure zero or minimum muscle loss. RFL would make you lose in the range of 2lbs/week or more generally. What is your current fat percentage, diet protocol?
I did a 20% calorie reduction from my maintenance, ate 1.5g x lean body weight and ate a balance of fats and carbs to fill my calorie requirement. I started at around 20% body fat and still look the same even though i lost 17 lbs.
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  #5  
Unread 11-24-2013, 02:00 PM
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Professor Chaos Professor Chaos is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sizeon View Post
I did a 20% calorie reduction from my maintenance, ate 1.5g x lean body weight and ate a balance of fats and carbs to fill my calorie requirement. I started at around 20% body fat and still look the same even though i lost 17 lbs.
If you were about 20% when you started (you said in another post at 191), that'd put you at 174. Let's say the loss was at a poor 15/2 fat/lean ratio, that'd put you around 13% right now. That'd be tough to not notice.

I'm not calling you a liar, but my hunch is that you were probably a higher body fat percentage when you started. If you were at say 24-25% when you started and lost 17 at a 16/1 ratio that'd put you at 17-18%, that could still look close to the same as 24-25%. Generally speaking the higher body fat a person is, the less noticeable 7-8% decreases are.

It's usually pretty disappointing when you realize how little LBM you have and how much fat you have... I know I was when I finally got dem abz for the first time. FWIW, this was prior to really digging into the main site and message boards here but I seriously thought I almost had 25lb more LBM than what I actually did.
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  #6  
Unread 11-24-2013, 02:27 PM
sizeon sizeon is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Professor Chaos View Post
If you were about 20% when you started (you said in another post at 191), that'd put you at 174. Let's say the loss was at a poor 15/2 fat/lean ratio, that'd put you around 13% right now. That'd be tough to not notice.

I'm not calling you a liar, but my hunch is that you were probably a higher body fat percentage when you started. If you were at say 24-25% when you started and lost 17 at a 16/1 ratio that'd put you at 17-18%, that could still look close to the same as 24-25%. Generally speaking the higher body fat a person is, the less noticeable 7-8% decreases are.

It's usually pretty disappointing when you realize how little LBM you have and how much fat you have... I know I was when I finally got dem abz for the first time. FWIW, this was prior to really digging into the main site and message boards here but I seriously thought I almost had 25lb more LBM than what I actually did.
http://www.accumeasurefitness.com/

That is the body fat caliper i used when measuring my superilliac. It says to measure the superilliac three times and take the average. I measured 20% on the three tries.
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  #7  
Unread 11-24-2013, 02:30 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Unfortunately, single measure estimates tend to be pretty poor; there are too many assumptions and unless you put on body fat in a very specific way, they simply don't give accurate results.
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  #8  
Unread 11-24-2013, 02:36 PM
Ryker Ryker is offline
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Originally Posted by lylemcd View Post
Unfortunately, single measure estimates tend to be pretty poor; there are too many assumptions and unless you put on body fat in a very specific way, they simply don't give accurate results.
On the other hand, James Krieger says caliper measurements are the best way to gauge changes in body fat on a smaller scale (say, going up or down by < 5%). I think he says on such scales they're even more accurate than DXA. I know that wasn't what he was asking, but would you agree with that?
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  #9  
Unread 11-24-2013, 04:43 PM
DOM DOM is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryker View Post
On the other hand, James Krieger says caliper measurements are the best way to gauge changes in body fat on a smaller scale (say, going up or down by < 5%). I think he says on such scales they're even more accurate than DXA. I know that wasn't what he was asking, but would you agree with that?
Lyle was commenting on the acumeasure link in the post above his.

This caliper uses a single measurement i.e. 1 site suprailliac, to determine body fat percentage. This just can't be as accurate as a properly done 7 or 9 site test performed by some one who knows what they are doing.

You can certainly use calipers yourself to see if skinfolds are decreasing or not when dieting, but i wouldn't be too confident in most peoples ability to determine their actual body fat percentage on their own.
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  #10  
Unread 11-24-2013, 05:52 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryker View Post
On the other hand, James Krieger says caliper measurements are the best way to gauge changes in body fat on a smaller scale (say, going up or down by < 5%). I think he says on such scales they're even more accurate than DXA. I know that wasn't what he was asking, but would you agree with that?
Two part article on the main site. As well, read the words, key ones bolded.

"Unfortunately, single measure estimates tend to be pretty poor; there are too many assumptions and unless you put on body fat in a very specific way, they simply don't give accurate results."
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