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  #1  
Unread 02-06-2013, 04:47 PM
Hifikepunye Hifikepunye is offline
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Default Degree of feet rotation in squat

Came across this video: http://www.mobilitywod.com/2012/03/f...ing-diane.html

Anyone can explain that to me? I squat pretty wide, probably about 1.5x shoulder width with feet externally rotated quite a bit (at least 30-45 degrees) since it's been said to emphasize hip adductors.

Would that be achievable by more forward facing toes? Is the recruitment of the hips (adductors in particular) determined ultimately by hip angle to knee angle ratio or would the feet direction influence this if at all?

Thanks.
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  #2  
Unread 02-06-2013, 04:51 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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It's Crossfit. Ignore it.
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  #3  
Unread 02-06-2013, 05:05 PM
unk unk is offline
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I pretty much can only squat how you do, I can't get 90 degrees without it, my hips are very inflexible. No stretches seem to actually stretch the deep lock in the hips I feel. You actually want a leg width and foot angle that allows you to maintain a neutral spine through the full ROM, flexing at the hips rather than with the spine. There in lies my problem.
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  #4  
Unread 02-13-2013, 07:27 PM
Waldz Waldz is offline
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This video elaborates on it.

Cliffs: Yes, toes forward allows greater torque IF you have sufficient mobility to do so correctly.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFzE9NolXyg
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  #5  
Unread 02-14-2013, 10:36 AM
Hifikepunye Hifikepunye is offline
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Thanks for the reply, I've seen the video though I'm not certain I got what I was supposed to out of it lol. What do you mean by "torque"?
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  #6  
Unread 02-14-2013, 08:48 PM
Heavy_Lifter85 Heavy_Lifter85 is offline
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Torque is the product of force and lever arm. It produces rotation.
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  #7  
Unread 02-14-2013, 09:06 PM
Donald Lee Donald Lee is offline
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Basically, if you turn out your feet out a lot, you're passively shortening some of your glute muscles. Your glutes are involved in external rotation/abduction, so by having your feet turned out, you're already removing one of it's functions.

Torque is a measure of rotational force. Torque = radius x force perpendicular to where the force is applied. When comparing having your feet forward to having them turned out, some of the glute muscles will have a greater radius with the former, so there's more torque (if the force applied is the same).

I'm not sure how much this all matters though. If you've got the hip internal rotation to be able to squat the way Kelly Starrett advocates, I guess it may put your glutes in a stronger position. I don't know if the glutes will be stronger in hip extension from being more internally rotated, which I think is more important for most than just being able to push your knees our more strongly. If you don't have the hip internal rotation to be able to do it, it'll put valgus stress on your knees if you attempt to do it.

If nothing else, holding the bottom position of the feet forward squat is a very good stretch for the glutes.
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  #8  
Unread 02-15-2013, 10:25 AM
Hifikepunye Hifikepunye is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donald Lee View Post
I'm not sure how much this all matters though. If you've got the hip internal rotation to be able to squat the way Kelly Starrett advocates, I guess it may put your glutes in a stronger position. I don't know if the glutes will be stronger in hip extension from being more internally rotated, which I think is more important for most than just being able to push your knees our more strongly.
It should, but IME only for the glute medius.
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  #9  
Unread 02-19-2013, 03:21 AM
Magumi Magumi is offline
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For some reason, when I do front squats, I prefer narrower stance with feet forward, when I do back squats, my feet are slightly more apart and more rotated. The difference in position is fairly small, though, and the depth of the squat is the same (atg). It just feels more natural. Now that you mention it, I've started wondering whether there is some biomechanical reason for that or whether it means that I suffer from some kind of muscular disbalance or shortening or something like that.
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  #10  
Unread 02-19-2013, 05:54 AM
unk unk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Magumi View Post
For some reason, when I do front squats, I prefer narrower stance with feet forward, when I do back squats, my feet are slightly more apart and more rotated. The difference in position is fairly small, though, and the depth of the squat is the same (atg). It just feels more natural. Now that you mention it, I've started wondering whether there is some biomechanical reason for that or whether it means that I suffer from some kind of muscular disbalance or shortening or something like that.
well I would postulate that the posterior weight of the backsquat demands more flexibility through the hips, frontsquat more from the ankles/glutes. Based on the fact that I do the same for front vs back squat, because I don't get the same terrible hip ROM feeling with front that I do with back
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