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  #1  
Unread 02-19-2013, 01:42 PM
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gog9 gog9 is offline
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Default Incline Bench to Flat Bench?

I have been flat bench press free for several months now. At my peak I was able to put up 315 for 3 reps at around 180-185 lbs. Nevertheless, I decided to retire flat benching as it was destroying my shoulders. Since then, I have been really focusing on incline benching! Which leads me to my question: how much harder would you consider incline benching compared to regular flat benching? Assuming a standard near 45 degree angle for the incline bench.

I've heard someone say that your incline bench press is usually about 80% of your flat bench. I'm not sure how accurate that is. Seems to be overestimating how hard incline bench is. By that logic my 255 lbs incline for 5 reps would be equivalent to nearly 320 lbs for 5 reps on flat bench. I would be more inclined (pun intended) to go with incline bench being around 82.5% of your flat bench.

The reason I ask is because it was a goal of mine to bench 315 lbs for 5 reps. Although I'm not flat benching anymore I would still like to hit the incline equivalent of 315 lbs for 5 reps.

What are your thoughts? If you know your flat bench and incline bench then please share below.
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Unread 02-19-2013, 01:58 PM
atresia atresia is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gog9 View Post
I've heard someone say that your incline bench press is usually about 80% of your flat bench. I'm not sure how accurate that is. Seems to be overestimating how hard incline bench is. By that logic my 255 lbs incline for 5 reps would be equivalent to nearly 320 lbs for 5 reps on flat bench. I would be more inclined (pun intended) to go with incline bench being around 82.5% of your flat bench.
Seriously? You're quibbling about 80 vs 82.5% for a highly variable estimate?
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  #3  
Unread 02-19-2013, 02:12 PM
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gog9 gog9 is offline
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I like to be specific and accurate. That 2.5% can mean the difference of 10 lbs. For an advanced lifter that can take several months to achieve.
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Unread 02-19-2013, 02:29 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Using an estimate is usually a mistake in the first place.

Start conservatively and work up.
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Unread 02-19-2013, 03:10 PM
atresia atresia is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lylemcd View Post
Using an estimate is usually a mistake in the first place.

Start conservatively and work up.
He's trying to come up with a precise percentile equivalent of 315x5 on the flat bench. Good luck with that
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  #6  
Unread 02-19-2013, 03:33 PM
BillSpeer BillSpeer is offline
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It's pretty simple. Take a set to failure and see
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  #7  
Unread 02-19-2013, 09:14 PM
Zemix Zemix is offline
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In terms of DB flat vs DB incline bench, I can do 75x8 on DB flat and 60x8 on DB incline (abour 80 percent of 75x8). However, I haven't tested my max on DB flat bench in 2 weeks and I hit 80x4 at another gym last week on DB flat.

80-83 percent, no big deal. I would train incline if you prefer that and do normal flat bench once every 2-3 weeks to see how your strength is (at 80-90 percent of your assumed maximal for 5-8 reps *so if your best is 100x8 do 80x8 etc just an example*)...once you feel incline is heavy enough, test out 305, 310, 315 on normal flat bench to see if you're there.
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Unread 02-19-2013, 10:33 PM
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Professor Chaos Professor Chaos is offline
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Back in high school and even my college days I was one of those weirdos that could incline nearly as much as I could bench probably within 90% in high school and college. These days I still train pretty hard on both flat and incline bench and can still incline press weights ridiculously close to that of my bench.

On my best days right now I can put up 6 of 315lb on flat bench, that is a first set totally fresh, that calculates to ~365lb. FWIW, in November of last year I did a single of 365lb. Today for my last set on incline (5 X 5) I put up 275lb for 6 reps which calculates out to ~320lb or about 87.5% of my bench max. That said, I only set the incline to ~30 degrees, use a wider grip than bench and don't go all the way to my chest on incline (although I get well past 90 degrees) so that may have something to do with it.

Here's the calculator that I used as well: One Rep Max Calculator

But the point is, it's going to be variable from individual to individual depending on the degree of the incline, grip width, chest touching on both exercises. There is probably a whole host of other biomechanical and nervous system stuff that is so far beyond me, it's an insult to those that know what they're talking about for me to bring it up.
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