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  #1  
Unread 04-15-2018, 04:58 PM
randyjr randyjr is offline
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Default Running and its impact to the Lumbar Spine Discs

Would love Lyle's opinion or anyone else who may have some education on this.

I tried to google exactly what parts of the body take the majority of impact of running but could not find a site talking specifically about it. I was trying to find a solid answer specifically about how running affects lower back discs. I did find one site that referenced two studies where running temporarily reduced the length of the spine directly after exercise but it was only temporarily.

I know a lot of muscles take impact from running, at least my calves so. So my question is...does running damage or stress the lumbar spine discs assuming good form and cushioned shoes are used? Or do other parts of the body take the brunt of running's impact?
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  #2  
Unread 04-15-2018, 05:29 PM
randyjr randyjr is offline
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Looks like I didn't search hard enough and found my answer. There was just a study done last year which actually says running can be good for the discs. I was not expecting that answer at all.

Been dealing with a herniated disc causing slight L5 nerve compression. The pain is random and not consistent, and it NEVER hurts to run, during or after. A ortho spine specialist and sports PCP said I could run as long as it didn't hurt. I'm definitely monitoring the issue and performing core work.

Anyways, the link is below.

https://www.nature.com/articles/srep45975
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  #3  
Unread 04-16-2018, 01:13 AM
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zLeeKo zLeeKo is offline
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What's the goal you're trying to accomplish with running? Most people have terrible running form, you can injure yourself even more.

Walking > running.
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  #4  
Unread 04-16-2018, 08:31 AM
lylemcdonald lylemcdonald is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zLeeKo View Post
What's the goal you're trying to accomplish with running? Most people have terrible running form, you can injure yourself even more.

Walking > running.
Agreed. Runners are universally smoe of the most injured endurance athletes on the planet a lot of which comes down to poor form, too rapid increases in mileage, insufficient rest, running on hard surfaces.

Do low impact cardio adn lift weights to have healthy bones IMO
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Unread 04-16-2018, 09:27 AM
AlphaBettor AlphaBettor is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zLeeKo View Post
What's the goal you're trying to accomplish with running? Most people have terrible running form, you can injure yourself even more.

Walking > running.
The thing is that walking and running aren't really comparable when it comes to aerobic adaptations. It takes somebody who is already in good shape to keep even a jog at 150 beats per minute, while the same person walking might not even hit 90 bpm.

I do agree with Lyle that weights + low impact cardio is best for most people. That's what I do in fact. That said, I do dabble in running sometimes and it's always enlightening having a conversation with more avid runners. Sometimes it's shocking how little consideration those things like form, rapid increases in mileage, insufficient rest, running on hard surfaces (and related-- worn out shoes) are given. And yes, a lot of them get injured or are well on their way (where they talk about various aches and pains and such.)
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Unread 04-16-2018, 03:39 PM
randyjr randyjr is offline
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Thanks for the responses all. Before i got the MRI news, I was running a lot and trying to improve my pace per mile. Not a racer anymore, but love running and just wanted to get faster.

Since the news, I have cut mileage and pace. Even with doctors approval of still running, I am being cautious and watching it. I am all too familiar with runners injuries, guilty of overtraining.
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  #7  
Unread 04-17-2018, 05:38 AM
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muki muki is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlphaBettor View Post
The thing is that walking and running aren't really comparable when it comes to aerobic adaptations. It takes somebody who is already in good shape to keep even a jog at 150 beats per minute, while the same person walking might not even hit 90 bpm.

I do agree with Lyle that weights + low impact cardio is best for most people. That's what I do in fact. That said, I do dabble in running sometimes and it's always enlightening having a conversation with more avid runners. Sometimes it's shocking how little consideration those things like form, rapid increases in mileage, insufficient rest, running on hard surfaces (and related-- worn out shoes) are given. And yes, a lot of them get injured or are well on their way (where they talk about various aches and pains and such.)

my experience shows recreative runners mostly being some kind of zealots, very assured in the health benefits of running (ignoring the risks at the same time) and very often acknowledging it as the only legitimate way of body weight control...

Even the ones that do listen and understand the other side of the coin, rarely tend to do any changes in their routine by incorporating less risky aerobic activities like cycling, incline walking, etc.

I guess running is like an addiction. You do it no matter what.
Until
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  #8  
Unread 04-17-2018, 08:07 AM
lylemcdonald lylemcdonald is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlphaBettor View Post
The thing is that walking and running aren't really comparable when it comes to aerobic adaptations. It takes somebody who is already in good shape to keep even a jog at 150 beats per minute, while the same person walking might not even hit 90 bpm.

I do agree with Lyle that weights + low impact cardio is best for most people. That's what I do in fact. That said, I do dabble in running sometimes and it's always enlightening having a conversation with more avid runners. Sometimes it's shocking how little consideration those things like form, rapid increases in mileage, insufficient rest, running on hard surfaces (and related-- worn out shoes) are given. And yes, a lot of them get injured or are well on their way (where they talk about various aches and pains and such.)
So pick one of a dozen non impact cardio modes
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  #9  
Unread 04-17-2018, 08:07 AM
lylemcdonald lylemcdonald is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muki View Post
my experience shows recreative runners mostly being some kind of zealots, very assured in the health benefits of running (ignoring the risks at the same time) and very often acknowledging it as the only legitimate way of body weight control...

Even the ones that do listen and understand the other side of the coin, rarely tend to do any changes in their routine by incorporating less risky aerobic activities like cycling, incline walking, etc.

I guess running is like an addiction. You do it no matter what.
Until
I would say that runners are the most addicted of all the endurnace athletes. And also the most injured. They won't stop running even if they are injured. Ever.

All zealots are zealots.
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