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  #1  
Unread 05-02-2017, 06:06 PM
aspire aspire is offline
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Default How do I find a StrongLifts or StartingStrength trainer?

Short version: I'm a total noob. I wanna do StrongLifts 5x5 or Starting Strength with a trainer for a few months. How do I find a trainer?

Last edited by aspire : 05-02-2017 at 06:28 PM.
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  #2  
Unread 05-02-2017, 06:07 PM
aspire aspire is offline
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I'm in Florida by the way.

Long version: I joined a gym today and I signed up for a sales appointment with a trainer. My intention is to learn proper form and get over gymphobia.

I realize a common trope on these forums is that chain gym trainers are underqualified and underpaid, but I was hoping he'd be able to teach me form for 5 barbell exercises. Uhm.. once the trainer and I got past me wanting to follow a program I found online instead of his "custom workouts"... he asked me what one of the basic barbell exercises even was (maybe overhead barbell press or barbell row, I forget which one). Not sure how he's going to be able to teach me form when he doesn't know the exercise. I still might buy some sessions just to get over gymphobia.

By the way, I don't like trainers warning me that I'm not gonna experience results if I don't follow their advice. On the other hand, I am a total newb, so while I have enough research skills to know I wanna do SS or SL5X5, I don't have the ability nor interest to defend my prior research which was conducted a long time ago. So I can understand that he probably found me annoying for disregarding his expertise. On the other hand, I'm telling him exactly what I want so that I will buy sessions. It's an easy sell!

I'm anticipating car salesman-like negotiations later. My friend signed up at the same gym chain and they start with offensively bad offers and don't stop calling. I signed up with a temporary phone number.

Last edited by aspire : 05-02-2017 at 06:36 PM.
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  #3  
Unread 05-02-2017, 07:15 PM
holly70 holly70 is offline
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Don't see any listings for SS in Florida here:

http://startingstrength.com/coaching/gyms

Maybe try using google for "strength and conditioning near me" or "iron gym near me".

Had somewhat the same experience trying a trainer at a chain gym. I was originally wanting to try SL. We had a failure to communicate.

Next tried a training type gym where I worked with someone for awhile that I liked. Did learn stuff and get some familiarity.

Didn't even hear of SS gyms until after I had been at the training place for a few months. I did go and do a visit/eval w/the nearest SS gym and I liked it fine, not impossible that I might still try it sometime.

ATM found a small pass key/24 hour gym that is working alright and feel I know enough to not get in too much trouble, which isn't saying a lot.

All a really long post to say if this first trainer doesn't work for you then keep looking.
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  #4  
Unread 05-04-2017, 11:47 AM
Heavy_Lifter85 Heavy_Lifter85 is offline
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If I wanted to learn the Big Lifts, I'd make friends with a powerlifter. To generalize/stereotype, they tend to be very conscious of technique and are willing to help beginners. Most chain gyms seem to have a few these days, even if they are sometimes wannabes.

Otherwise you can just take cell phone video of your lifts and review it or post it up on a forum.

I did the whole PT thing for a while but honestly felt bad about selling sessions at $50 hour. It felt like highway robbery when most people needed a very basic routine and very basic technique instruction. If you don't need major corrective work, which most trainers I've seen seem oblivious of anyway, you don't need to pay those kind of prices. My $0.02.
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  #5  
Unread 05-05-2017, 12:23 AM
Determinism Determinism is offline
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The only question I have: why do you need a trainer for a 5x5 program? Waste of money and probably they will teach you wrong. There, I said it.
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  #6  
Unread 05-05-2017, 01:12 AM
BigPecsPeter BigPecsPeter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Determinism View Post
The only question I have: why do you need a trainer for a 5x5 program? Waste of money and probably they will teach you wrong. There, I said it.
Oh my goodness. I just agreed with something you wrote!!


Yeah, that. Honestly, there are people in the gym you can ask for advice and they'll help you for free. And they're usually just as knowledgeable as most the PTs.

And in terms of program structuring, you have us.
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  #7  
Unread 05-05-2017, 08:36 AM
fpena911 fpena911 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Determinism View Post
The only question I have: why do you need a trainer for a 5x5 program? Waste of money and probably they will teach you wrong. There, I said it.
Not only that but the Starting Strength book outlines the techniques in great detail. Then you can go on to Youtube and see it live. Afterwards you can post your videos for critique. Beats paying someone who barely knows anything just to tell you what you know.
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  #8  
Unread 05-05-2017, 09:47 AM
AlphaBettor AlphaBettor is offline
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Probably 95% of people I've seen in gyms squat horribly. Depth is almost always an issue, even among people who swear they are going to parallel.(always funny when watching from the side and they aren't even close)

Often times there is excessive forward lean with the back rounding and other biomechanical horrors. This is an issue even among the people who are doing SS, SL, Madcow, Texas Method, or some weird hybrid routines they've come up with. I've seen them all.

My point here is that if you're going to do a program built around squatting, you may as well learn to do it correctly. A small number of people pick it up naturally but most others will have to do some mobility work (because they are all screwed up from being on the computer all day) and put some effort into improving the lifts on a regular basis. Most won't do this though. A trainer is actually a very good solution but then cost, availability, and actually finding a knowledgeable trainer who can teach the lifts properly can be hard to come by.

One reasonable approach is to ease your way into the gym with less demanding exercises (in both effort and technique), get more comfortable in the gym, keep learning new things and then if you really want to squat then do it the right way and not like the 95% of people who do it in commercial gyms. I guess that approach isn't cool enough even though I know what happens when you throw an unsupervised beginner onto a program based around squatting. It rarely turns out well.

Last edited by AlphaBettor : 05-05-2017 at 09:51 AM.
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  #9  
Unread 05-05-2017, 12:22 PM
BigPecsPeter BigPecsPeter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlphaBettor View Post
Probably 95% of people I've seen in gyms squat horribly. Depth is almost always an issue, even among people who swear they are going to parallel.(always funny when watching from the side and they aren't even close)

Often times there is excessive forward lean with the back rounding and other biomechanical horrors. This is an issue even among the people who are doing SS, SL, Madcow, Texas Method, or some weird hybrid routines they've come up with. I've seen them all.

My point here is that if you're going to do a program built around squatting, you may as well learn to do it correctly. A small number of people pick it up naturally but most others will have to do some mobility work (because they are all screwed up from being on the computer all day) and put some effort into improving the lifts on a regular basis. Most won't do this though. A trainer is actually a very good solution but then cost, availability, and actually finding a knowledgeable trainer who can teach the lifts properly can be hard to come by.

One reasonable approach is to ease your way into the gym with less demanding exercises (in both effort and technique), get more comfortable in the gym, keep learning new things and then if you really want to squat then do it the right way and not like the 95% of people who do it in commercial gyms. I guess that approach isn't cool enough even though I know what happens when you throw an unsupervised beginner onto a program based around squatting. It rarely turns out well.
Squatting is not rocket science.

Yes, mobility is important. But developing mobility can be accomplished without having to go to the trouble and expense of employing a personal trainer. There are very simple steps that can be taken to improve mobility over time.

If a person has developed sufficient mobility, squatting is easy as pie.
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  #10  
Unread 05-05-2017, 01:35 PM
AlphaBettor AlphaBettor is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigPecsPeter View Post
Squatting is not rocket science.

Yes, mobility is important. But developing mobility can be accomplished without having to go to the trouble and expense of employing a personal trainer. There are very simple steps that can be taken to improve mobility over time.

If a person has developed sufficient mobility, squatting is easy as pie.
Based on your posting style, I imagine you to be a fairly young, athletic guy who has worked out for quite some time. Maybe that history does not lend you to understanding the challenges that people go through who are overweight, inflexible with postural issues, who were never very athletic, or aren't really built to squat in the first place.

Squatting is not rocket science-- true. Heck, squatting in theory should be really easy. You put the bar over your shoulder/upper traps (ignoring the argument about bar placement), you squat down, and you squat back up. Simple cues might be knees out/over the toes, and keep the chest up.

If it were only that easy, everybody's squat form should look great. What is going on that the large majority of people who squat in gyms manage to screw it up?

I'm not saying that everybody needs a trainer to learn how to squat. A lot of people who squat probably shouldn't but that's a whole different argument. If somebody is new to weight training, they want to do one of these programs, and they can spare the expense, it is a very good idea to get hands on, competent coaching. That can make things so much easier for them, saving endless frustration and possible injury.

If that's not practical then obviously they can learn from articles/books, take video, post form checks, etc. There are also gym members to learn from although you have to have good judgement to know who to take advice from.
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