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  #1  
Unread 05-04-2011, 05:25 AM
12914 12914 is offline
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Default spinach and other fibrous vegetables

Hello all,
I wanted to thank the collective group of you for the valuable insight and feedback you've provided so far; this information in conjunction with what I've gleaned from Lyle's books (RFL, FD, and TKD) has helped me achieve solid improvements and keeps me on track to continue the course in order to reach my goals -and hopefully maintain them once reached.

Despite having a decent handle on the deficit, the refeeds, and the exercise, I know I am failing miserably at incorporating spinach and / or other fibrous vegetables in my diet. I find it very hard to palate them and was raised in a family where vegetables where eaten sporadically only... and cooked in butter or covered with cheese when prepared.

Could you please suggest some method(s) of preparing spinach or other fibrous vegetables in such a way that they could be eaten frequently and would not compromise taste and calorie count?

thanks in advance,
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  #2  
Unread 05-04-2011, 08:06 AM
VeritasInvictus VeritasInvictus is offline
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THere was some talk on here about a veggie shake. Like a protein shake but for veggies.

Might not fill you up but if your sole purpose is the micronutrients from the veggies than it may be your best bet.

I love just plain steamed veggies.
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Unread 05-04-2011, 08:08 AM
djc djc is offline
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Wish I could help, but I usually just go steamed veggies with soy sauce or lemon juice or salsa depending on the veggie.

Zucchini, summer squash and soy sauce is a current fav, or cucumbers and red wine vinegar.
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Unread 05-04-2011, 08:11 AM
gallan gallan is offline
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Gordon Ramsey's broccoli soup. All it is is broccoli,salt and water. Surprisingly good. Be very careful blending the hot broccoli and water mix. Hold the top of the blender tight. Don't overcook the broccoli.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mvc8Au4YO60
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  #5  
Unread 05-04-2011, 10:21 AM
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bstrong bstrong is offline
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You might experiment with some of the less well known dark green leafy veggies or fibrous veggies. Instead of spinach, for example, try Swiss chard, which isn't as slimy when it's cooked and doesn't have that gritty, acidic mouth feel. My 9-year old adores the red-stemmed Swiss Chard, but won't touch spinach.

Or, if you don't care for the standard cruciferous veggies, try peeling up a kohlrabi, slicing it, and eating it raw: it's sweet, mildly spicy, and satisfies the need for something crunchy. Plus it's a good vehicle for salsa. Savoy cabbage -- the crinkly head cabbage -- has a milder taste than "regular" green cabbage; Napa or Chinese cabbage are also very mild, and in my neck of the woods are often cheaper.

Similarly, try different preparations. Novice cooks tend to overcook broccoli and cauliflower, which makes it pretty miserable unless you douse it in butter or cheese. Try cooking your broccoli "al dente"; remember that it will soften up a bit more even after it's off the stove because of the residual heat. IMO, cauliflower is best raw (assuming you're buying it fresh, not frozen). Etc.

If none of that works, well, think of popeye and suck it up.

//b.strong

Last edited by bstrong : 05-04-2011 at 10:27 AM.
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  #6  
Unread 05-04-2011, 01:56 PM
crosslark crosslark is offline
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Default Spinach or other leafy greens

Several suggestions:

Take it in an Italian direction by sauteeing onions in a little olive oil add chicken stock and spinach and crushed tomatoes or tomato paste. Anchovies if you like them.

Cook up 2-3 slices of bacon, pour off most of the grease, saute the spinach with bacon. Could throw in some mushrooms.

Take it in a Mexican direction by sauteeing onions then spinach with chili powder, crushed tomatos and a little unsweetened cocoa powder.

Take it in an Oriental direction with soy sauce and dried shrimp.
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Unread 05-04-2011, 02:13 PM
Uziel Uziel is offline
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You can salt and use spray butter on kale and then bake it in the oven to make crispy kale chips that are delicious. The bonus is that most people don't even know what kale is and it's cheap.
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Unread 05-04-2011, 09:58 PM
12914 12914 is offline
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Thanks all. I'm going to try these suggestions and use several on a cycle basis for variety. I tried the kale just because it was something so different than what I'm used to and it came out very well. What a great idea. Thanks for sharing.

Next I'll try the broccoli soup.

Any other suggestions are very welcome.
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Unread 05-08-2011, 05:29 AM
FutureisNow FutureisNow is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 12914 View Post
Thanks all. I'm going to try these suggestions and use several on a cycle basis for variety. I tried the kale just because it was something so different than what I'm used to and it came out very well. What a great idea. Thanks for sharing.

Next I'll try the broccoli soup.

Any other suggestions are very welcome.
I toss a handful of chopped frozen spinich into an egg white ommlet.
Squeeze out water first. It does add some moisture and texture to the ommlet. I personally like this taste.

A little garlic and salt are always good with spinich and most steamed/boiled greens. I also like kale and grow it in my garden, though takes a lot longer to cook/soften.

Curious about the broc soup now!

Last edited by FutureisNow : 05-08-2011 at 05:38 AM.
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  #10  
Unread 05-08-2011, 06:26 AM
gallan gallan is offline
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I like to let the broccoli soup chill a bit in the fridge before I consume it.
I think it is actually better cold. Does this make it a broccoli shake perhaps? Anyway...you can get a lot of broccoli in you quickly and easily with this method of preparation.
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