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  #1  
Unread 04-13-2014, 04:10 PM
Birdoftruth Birdoftruth is offline
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Default Where can I learn about weight lifting for Striking Sports?

So I've done Judo and Krav maga for 1 year and would like to do Muay Thai next. To be honest, this is my first time I would actually have to switch up my routine to be more targeted since the demands of the sport is different, therefore I do not know much about this kind of training. I assume it's a lot of endurance training? Where can I find more about how I should switch up my training for muay thai?
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Unread 04-13-2014, 05:10 PM
noah_k noah_k is offline
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Not a precise answer, but I think this is a really good article to consider for martial arts in general: http://www.powering-through.com/2012...jacked-by.html

The same can be said for wrestling I think with personal experience. Technique and drills on the mat, but strength and conditioning for a specific sport instead of for its own sake isn't a whole new ballgame with strange and fancy exercises.

The cardio, strength, and explosivity of normal training will complement technique of the sport. Someone recently (like yesterday I think) posted on GSP's specialization and rep ranges, but as Lyle stated we have to remember he is an elite athlete with the strictest of demands that wouldn't make much of a difference to you or I.

Oh! And if you trust your muay thai gym, always seek out counsel there. Find out what's done in addition to the sessions. Definitely easier to do it as part of a group eh.
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Unread 04-13-2014, 06:17 PM
noah_k noah_k is offline
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Here was the GSP thread http://forums.lylemcdonald.com/showthread.php?t=28353
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Unread 04-13-2014, 07:05 PM
counterpuncher counterpuncher is offline
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If it were me, I would spar with the more experienced members of my gym in order to find out what areas I had weaknesses in, then train those weaknesses.
As important as conditioning is, the best way to get good at any combat sport is to practice that sport.
Skill training should be #1, followed by conditioning, then strength.
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  #5  
Unread 04-13-2014, 07:13 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by counterpuncher View Post
If it were me, I would spar with the more experienced members of my gym in order to find out what areas I had weaknesses in, then train those weaknesses.
As important as conditioning is, the best way to get good at any combat sport is to practice that sport.
Skill training should be #1, followed by conditioning, then strength.
Yes, this. Keep in mind that absolute strength levels for striking sports are unlikely to be massive. It's more about explosiveness and strength.
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Unread 04-14-2014, 02:00 PM
Birdoftruth Birdoftruth is offline
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thanks guys, read the article and thread and helped out a lot. appreciate it.
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