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  #1  
Unread 12-06-2011, 10:44 AM
FitnessCPA FitnessCPA is offline
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Default "Built for Show" workout

I used to work out a lot and be in great shape. I let myself go after college for a couple years, but I recently lost about 45 pounds doing Beachbody's Insanity and P90X workouts. They're not the best but they got me going. I've since moved onto the "Built for Show" workout. I'm sure some of you have heard of it.

I am now 5'6" 145 pounds and in pretty good shape. I'm lean, have a two pack, and have gotten much stronger. 30" waist, down from 36" just five months ago.

The program is three days a week, upper/lower split, so each one is done three times in two weeks. There is no cardio involved.

I am willing to sacrifice some gains in mass in order to keep in good cardio shape. I am thinking of adding in 5-6 sets of plyometric type exercises after each workout. For example, 20 squat jumps, 20 burpees, and 20 mountain climbers, two sets each.

I'm also thinking of adding in one day, say Saturday, of 30 minutes on the elliptical at a moderate intensity, to the point that I wouldn't be able to do much more than 30 minutes.

The goal is two-fold:
1. Do SOME cardio
2. Do the cardio that is most likely to result in muscle gain/fat loss. I think this is intervals, but I'm not sure.

Some opinions would be appreciated. I do like having a nice fatty cheat meal on the weekends so I figure maybe the cardio plus that could be a decent metabolism shocker. I just don't want to stop doing cardio completely, even if I am in a muscle building phase.
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Unread 12-06-2011, 04:04 PM
lylemcd's Avatar
lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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You seem to be approaching you training by 'Throwing crap at the wall and seeing what sticks'. What do you think the plyos will add to your training given your explicit goals? Do you even know what your goals are?
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Unread 12-06-2011, 05:20 PM
Sam Hell Jr. Sam Hell Jr. is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2011
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CPA, like you, I started training seriously a few years out of school, and, like you, when I got tired of downloading random crap off the internet, I bought "Built for Show." ("Hey, it's only $15!") Here's the thing about that book: it's a mess. I've read a lot of training logs. I've never heard of anybody finishing BFS.

The strength programs aren't awful-awful, but my experience with undulating periodization as a beginner was, I spent all my time juggling plates and losing my place in my workout log, and my progress beyond the first couple of months was minimal. And the more advanced, "athleticism" programs are just ridiculous. Barbell squat jumps. For a trainee that's ostensibly uncoached and has only been lifting six months. Unwise.

$0.02: Go read the Weight Training for Beginners series on here, choose one of those programs, and ignore everything else for a while. Don't do what I did, which is ... (1) Diet down. (2) Buy new weight training program. (3) Tank. (4) Get fat; freak out. (5) Repeat from first step. All that metabolic conditioning stuff made me good at profuse sweating and burpees, but it was no substitute for learning how to lift, and I wasted about three years learning that.
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