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  #1  
Unread 02-07-2014, 02:12 PM
bxguinea69 bxguinea69 is offline
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Default Research Suggesting that Portion Control (Lack of) is a Major Obesity Driver

It is evident that society today really has lost the concept of proper portion sizes. It is a large factor in the obesity problem that plagues us today. I thought I'd share this essay on the subject which suggests that larger portion sizes at restaurants, larger packaging, and even larger bowls/plates are all contributors to people eating more than they should. I believe there is a lot of truth to this and I have often heard Lyle mention that no one seems to know what the proper portions are for food these days. I couldn't agree more and I personally need to weight things to get the portions right most of the time.

http://mindlesseating.org/lastsupper..._JADA_2007.pdf
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  #2  
Unread 02-07-2014, 02:20 PM
barbells barbells is offline
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Portion control and impulse control, going hand in hand. Stumbled on a random article about the evolution of food photography the other day and what struck me is how the trend has steadily gone from "food that looks like it's meticulously prepared to be enjoyed in a social and special setting" to "food that is ready to eat, or has already begun to be eaten, RIGHT NOW" (artfully tousled crumbles, drips, bite marks etc).

I can't wait for the day mankind literally just, lives on an auto-liposuction toilet bowl getting sugar and fat shoveled in by an apparatus while getting jerked off. Because it's just not ever enough.
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  #3  
Unread 02-07-2014, 03:30 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Portion size is certainly a big variable. Various research have shown that we tend to eat more the more food we are given. So portions have gotten gradually larger over time, not only do most people have no clue what a 'normal' portion is but they will automatically tend to eat more because of it.

Case in point, if you look at the average caloric value/macro content of a typical restaurant meal in America, it's easily 2-3X what most 'need' to eat (hence the suggestion to jsut put half of it in a doggy bag before you start eating). I spent a bit of time in the UK and I was simply appalled at how little food they brought. But what they were bringing was closer to a 'proper' portion than what I was used to.

There are many other inherent drivers on obesity but certainly this is one of them.

It's why I recommend, despite the pain in the buttedness of it, that people spend at least a couple of weeks measuring out their foods. This is really the only way for people to gain any sort of awareness of what actual portions and intake levels should be.
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  #4  
Unread 02-07-2014, 11:05 PM
dbp dbp is offline
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I ate at a pub here in Vancouver yesterday. I noticed that my portion was monsterous. The waitress remarked that she frequently got American customers who said "Finally, a canadian restaurant with a decent serving size!"
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Unread 02-09-2014, 05:10 PM
grinch031 grinch031 is offline
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Personally I would say it might be a minor contributor simply because it increases the convenience of accessing and eating the food. I still think the combination of increased palatability + calorie density is the main driver of obesity. I've tried tricks around the house such as using smaller plates, or trying to avoid seconds, or even trying to package up part of the meal at the restaurant. I end up raiding the fridge for leftovers later on anyways no matter what I do. I think for me the only way to control my impulses is to increase the satiety of the foods I eat and reduce the palatability and caloric density, but most importantly to keep the bad foods out of reach. If I'm going to have junk, then they need to be in the house in very limited quantities. Unfortunately living in a house with a wife and three kids, I have no say over what kind of foods reside in the house.

Ironically the only time I found it easy to avoid junk foods was when I believed they were detrimental to my health because of my former beliefs about carbohydrates. Now that I don't believe that stuff anymore, its now harder for me to control myself when it comes to these foods.
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  #6  
Unread 02-09-2014, 05:19 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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And when personal ancedotes equal science, your personal example might be relevant to what's being discussed.
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  #7  
Unread 02-09-2014, 09:29 PM
jimjack jimjack is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grinch031 View Post
Personally I would say it might be a minor contributor simply because it increases the convenience of accessing and eating the food. I still think the combination of increased palatability + calorie density is the main driver of obesity. I've tried tricks around the house such as using smaller plates, or trying to avoid seconds, or even trying to package up part of the meal at the restaurant. I end up raiding the fridge for leftovers later on anyways no matter what I do. I think for me the only way to control my impulses is to increase the satiety of the foods I eat and reduce the palatability and caloric density, but most importantly to keep the bad foods out of reach. If I'm going to have junk, then they need to be in the house in very limited quantities. Unfortunately living in a house with a wife and three kids, I have no say over what kind of foods reside in the house.

Ironically the only time I found it easy to avoid junk foods was when I believed they were detrimental to my health because of my former beliefs about carbohydrates. Now that I don't believe that stuff anymore, its now harder for me to control myself when it comes to these foods.
Before I put a bite of food in my mouth I know exactly what I am going to eat for the meal. Once that is done, it is done. No leftovers, no raiding the fridge...eat what I planned for.
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  #8  
Unread 02-10-2014, 06:19 AM
MrkyMrk MrkyMrk is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimjack View Post
Before I put a bite of food in my mouth I know exactly what I am going to eat for the meal. Once that is done, it is done. No leftovers, no raiding the fridge...eat what I planned for.
Socially debilitating, but also what I have to do. Sad
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  #9  
Unread 02-10-2014, 06:43 AM
Lostinthebs Lostinthebs is offline
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Went into a KFC a couple of months back (I was desperate !!) and was horrified to see that 1 of the meal deals was a massive 1800kcals, this for just 1 meal !!

Worse, 2 men that already looked like they had paid too many visits to such establishments ordered this very meal.

I was quite happy with 2 mini 'chicken' fillets to tide me over before finding some real food

Lyle, here in the UK I think you must have been at a high end London restaurant because portion sizes are definitely on the increase and it's being reflected in the physiques of our younger generations, seems to be mid 20's and younger where it's most common.

Also, I think we have a problem with our supermarkets. All the offers like 2 for 1 etc seem to be on fizzy drinks, beer, pizza, junk foods and chocolate. Meanwhile, the price of healthy foods such as fresh meats, fruit and veg seems to keep rising weekly.
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  #10  
Unread 02-10-2014, 06:47 AM
BigPecsPeter BigPecsPeter is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lylemcd View Post
I spent a bit of time in the UK and I was simply appalled at how little food they brought. But what they were bringing was closer to a 'proper' portion than what I was used to.
True dat. Restaurants here are miserly as hell. That's why we're slightly less fat than you suckas. 64% overweight and proud, baby.
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