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  #1  
Unread 10-25-2014, 01:29 AM
intensetrainboy intensetrainboy is offline
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Default How to retain the information you read?

So, first, the problem: many of us face the problem of forgetting what you've read and have to go through the text all over again to find out what we forgot. Or worse, we don't even remember the text.

That happens too much with me on Lyle's articles and self-helping books that I read. Knowing that, I have a question: How to retain the information you read?

I just downloaded the articles of Lyle and put it in OneDrive together with a Word Document. I will read the articles in a PDF reader through my Ipad and highlight the important parts to my life. After finishing the reading and highlighting I will reread the highlights and in the Word document summarize what is important for me to retain (I used Lyle's articles as example but I intend to do it for books as well).
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  #2  
Unread 10-27-2014, 06:28 AM
laf laf is offline
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That's a good strategy; you might also schedule reviewing your summary couple weeks later.
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  #3  
Unread 10-28-2014, 06:52 AM
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Professor Chaos Professor Chaos is offline
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Write down what you want to remember and that is write with a pen/pencil and paper, not type on a keyboard. There is a remarkable connection between what you're hands and fingers physically do and what you're mind is able to recall.
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  #4  
Unread 10-28-2014, 08:17 AM
w1cked w1cked is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Professor Chaos View Post
Write down what you want to remember and that is write with a pen/pencil and paper, not type on a keyboard. There is a remarkable connection between what you're hands and fingers physically do and what you're mind is able to recall.
I used this strategy as a test preparation tools. Make a cheat sheet. Then re write that sheet. By the half a dozen time you do it that info will stay in your head. Oh, and sleep on it, it helps retain it more. I do not know why.
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  #5  
Unread 10-28-2014, 11:18 AM
intensetrainboy intensetrainboy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by laf View Post
That's a good strategy; you might also schedule reviewing your summary couple weeks later.
Yes, I will review it when I need it. Without having to go through all the article/ book again.

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Originally Posted by Professor Chaos View Post
Write down what you want to remember and that is write with a pen/pencil and paper, not type on a keyboard. There is a remarkable connection between what you're hands and fingers physically do and what you're mind is able to recall.
Splendid observation! Thanks for that, searched up real quickly and there are a few studies proving that.
Unfortunately, Lyle isn't in this field to sum up all the scientific studies for us. But if you know a guy who does that in this kind of field, tell me.
But, I DEFINITELY agree with that proposition and always thought it was better. But in my opinion, it is more of a cultural thing, since we were raised in a school where we used pencil to make notes through many years. Maybe for the next generation they will be better with computer, maybe...

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Originally Posted by w1cked View Post
I used this strategy as a test preparation tools. Make a cheat sheet. Then re write that sheet. By the half a dozen time you do it that info will stay in your head. Oh, and sleep on it, it helps retain it more. I do not know why.
For sure it is a good strategy, but I think it limits what you want to retain and isn't time-effective, IMO.
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  #6  
Unread 10-28-2014, 01:27 PM
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Professor Chaos Professor Chaos is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by w1cked View Post
I used this strategy as a test preparation tools. Make a cheat sheet. Then re write that sheet. By the half a dozen time you do it that info will stay in your head. Oh, and sleep on it, it helps retain it more. I do not know why.
I should've mentinoed that. Writing things down even 3 or 4 times (even be it in short hand form) brings about profound information retention.

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Originally Posted by intensetrainboy View Post
Yes, I will review it when I need it. Without having to go through all the article/ book again.


Splendid observation! Thanks for that, searched up real quickly and there are a few studies proving that.
Unfortunately, Lyle isn't in this field to sum up all the scientific studies for us. But if you know a guy who does that in this kind of field, tell me.
But, I DEFINITELY agree with that proposition and always thought it was better. But in my opinion, it is more of a cultural thing, since we were raised in a school where we used pencil to make notes through many years. Maybe for the next generation they will be better with computer, maybe...


For sure it is a good strategy, but I think it limits what you want to retain and isn't time-effective, IMO.
I think it is actually very time effective but it is something that is going to take more time than other types of information retention.
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  #7  
Unread 10-28-2014, 01:37 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Professor Chaos View Post
I should've mentinoed that. Writing things down even 3 or 4 times (even be it in short hand form) brings about profound information retention. .
I used to recopy my notes in college for at least 2 reasons

1. make it legible
2. force me to do a bit more active learning as I had to pay attention/comprehend it as I rewrote
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  #8  
Unread 10-28-2014, 03:24 PM
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david david is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lylemcd View Post
I used to recopy my notes in college for at least 2 reasons

1. make it legible
2. force me to do a bit more active learning as I had to pay attention/comprehend it as I rewrote
OMG I did the exact same thing. Of course, it was harder back then, with chisel and stone tablet.
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  #9  
Unread 10-28-2014, 05:30 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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You know how hard it is to copy smoke signals?

Damn hard I tell you.
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  #10  
Unread 10-28-2014, 08:40 PM
InsertCleverNameHere InsertCleverNameHere is offline
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Doing what Lyle suggests and then putting the things into something like Cornell notes format could be helpful.
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