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  #1  
Unread 01-10-2018, 10:25 AM
skywalkr skywalkr is offline
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Default Stretching Routine/Program Needed

Years of neglecting to stretch has left me ridiculously tight and inflexible in just about every way. Anytime I start to try and stretch I get discouraged because I don't really know what I should be doing and since I am overly tight just about everywhere I could spend forever stretching and end up never getting into a good routine.

For that reason I am looking for a basic, put together, routine/program that I can follow to start building some initial flexibility but I am not really sure where to start as there seems to be a lot of different approaches to this sort of thing. I really need it to be a program that I can just easily read and follow, I don't want to have a lot of flexibility (no pun intended) in picking out different stretches because I don't know what I am doing and would more likely stick to a routine if someone else designed it. I don't mind paying or buying a book if it is worth it.

Any suggestions?
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  #2  
Unread 01-10-2018, 10:37 AM
Determinism Determinism is offline
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Maybe slightly off-topic, but do you take into consideration that stiffness in tendons and muscles actually gives you more strength?

I think it's good that you try to be more flexible, but if you're on a strength program you may want to limit it.
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  #3  
Unread 01-10-2018, 10:41 AM
AlphaBettor AlphaBettor is offline
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There's a chapter in "The Insider's Tell-All Handbook on Weight-Training Technique" by Stuart McRobert that has a stretching program. I've used that before, dropping some stretches that I don't like or need and replacing some others with easier/more practical stretches.

That said, you probably don't need to buy a book just for this. The stretching technique is pretty simple. Push a stretch to the point of mild tension, hold there until that tension dissipates, push a bit further, hold until tension dissipates again, repeat until you there's no further improvement. That's it for that stretch for the day.

There are guides online to fill in some of the details programming wise. I wish I had one off the top of my head to recommend, but I've basically just treated things like other parameters of programming-- stretch more often to improve flexibility and then that can be maintained on lower frequency.
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  #4  
Unread 01-10-2018, 10:44 AM
skywalkr skywalkr is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Determinism View Post
Maybe slightly off-topic, but do you take into consideration that stiffness in tendons and muscles actually gives you more strength?

I think it's good that you try to be more flexible, but if you're on a strength program you may want to limit it.
I am way past the point of it being beneficial, it has caused me to get injured too often and decreases my quality of life of just being more stiff/in pain than I need to. I would gladly sacrifice strength for flexibility.
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  #5  
Unread 01-10-2018, 10:47 AM
skywalkr skywalkr is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlphaBettor View Post
There's a chapter in "The Insider's Tell-All Handbook on Weight-Training Technique" by Stuart McRobert that has a stretching program. I've used that before, dropping some stretches that I don't like or need and replacing some others with easier/more practical stretches.

That said, you probably don't need to buy a book just for this. The stretching technique is pretty simple. Push a stretch to the point of mild tension, hold there until that tension dissipates, push a bit further, hold until tension dissipates again, repeat until you there's no further improvement. That's it for that stretch for the day.

There are guides online to fill in some of the details programming wise. I wish I had one off the top of my head to recommend, but I've basically just treated things like other parameters of programming-- stretch more often to improve flexibility and then that can be maintained on lower frequency.
Thanks, that is kind of what most of what I find seems to be and I get why. I guess I just know myself well enough that if I have a program someone has written that I can follow I am more likely to stick with it and see good results. It is like when I follow one of Lyle's books I see WAY better results and adhere to the plan more than when I just wing it.
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  #6  
Unread 01-10-2018, 11:09 AM
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zLeeKo zLeeKo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Determinism View Post
Maybe slightly off-topic, but do you take into consideration that stiffness in tendons and muscles actually gives you more strength?

I think it's good that you try to be more flexible, but if you're on a strength program you may want to limit it.
Yeah, but at risk of getting injured. Too much flexibility is also not good.
But stretching can aid in recovery, which can result in more strength.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlphaBettor View Post
Push a stretch to the point of mild tension, hold there until that tension dissipates, push a bit further, hold until tension dissipates again, repeat until you there's no further improvement. That's it for that stretch for the day.
+100

I need to repeat what you said, just a bit more detailed:

1. Take stretch to the point of light tension
2. Hold it until the muscle relaxes. Now, you will often see absolute values thrown out for stretching time but these are as meanigless as 8 glasses of water per day. Hold it until YOUR muscles relax. If it's 10 seconds, great. If it's 60 seconds, so be it.
3. Take muscle to the point of light tension (e.g. stretch further)
4. repeat step 2
5. When you no longer make improvemnets, you are done with that stretch for the day

As well, program stretches from isolation to compound, the opposite of how you lift weights.

Most people stretch like petards, because stretching is boring.
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  #7  
Unread 01-10-2018, 07:04 PM
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alcahuetej alcahuetej is offline
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I wish I had a routine to give you, but the one I have unfortunately is built around stretches given to me by physical therapists over the years...because I was already injured.

The only thing I can add, as a 35 year old with about 20 years of lifting under my belt, is to definitely stretch. I also stretch after I lift weights, and warm up with light weights of whatever exercise(s) I'm doing that day.

Great thread by the way as this is an often overlooked aspect of lifting, and there's already some good advice in here.
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  #8  
Unread 01-10-2018, 08:40 PM
holly70 holly70 is offline
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- Start with warm muscles.
- Yin yoga class.

Doesn't have to be a class, could be some good videos on youtube; haven't looked.

I have some kind of postural issue that criss crosses my body. i've been aware of it for a long time and know which areas to specifically get worked on in massage.

Now that I know the general progression and a lot of the poses I can do it fairly well on my own.

You work through the entire body with definite emphasis on shoulders and hips.

Get into a pose as best you can then gradually relax into it as the tightness lessens.

It is a slow progression that doesn't require a lot of strength or balance.

A few props are good...blanket, block, and strap.
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  #9  
Unread 01-15-2018, 01:14 PM
stallion009 stallion009 is offline
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I've been doing Focused Flexibility for around the last 10-12 months now. It's not too bad. It costs money though.

If you're looking for some generic flexibility work, I'd just go to yoga a few days a week. It seems to be good at an overall package of work. Else you could pick your two tightest issues and work on them for a number of weeks. Then move onto two others. So maybe like hamstrings and shoulders.

Speaking from my flexibility experience as someone that isn't flexible at all - it's a long term game. Build a routine and slowly move forward.
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  #10  
Unread 01-15-2018, 01:39 PM
BigPecsPeter BigPecsPeter is offline
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Lol

For goodness sake. Just stretch a little each day, gradually trying to improve range of motion in whatever muscles you're stretching.

You don't need a special tailored program and you DEFINITELY don't need yoga.

Go read Stretching Scientifically by the great Thomas Kurtz
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