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  #1  
Unread 04-02-2012, 11:45 AM
jaypatel33 jaypatel33 is offline
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Default Anthony Colpo on grains

Anthony uses research and isn't a low-carb paleo guy. But he is strongly anti-wholegrain.

http://anthonycolpo.com/?p=852
http://anthonycolpo.com/?p=2385

Some things he brings up. Wholegrains are worse than refined grains, as the fibre has plenty anti-nutrients and is essentially sawdust to the gut. He argues, in terms of GI, there is little different, hence most cultures eat white rice. And that wholegrains recommendations are based more on vested interests and government lobbying rather than any sound scientific data.

What you guys think, he seems quite emotional about the topic to be honest, but he also backs up his finding with research articles so am wondering what are the established views.
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  #2  
Unread 04-02-2012, 04:18 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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I have been amused watching him become as much of an ideologist as those he criticizes.
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  #3  
Unread 04-02-2012, 09:11 PM
jimireeves jimireeves is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lylemcd View Post
I have been amused watching him become as much of an ideologist as those he criticizes.
The "Heart of Darkness' syndrome.

Similar to so many young,fresh,intelligent politicians,scientists,doctors,artists,...who take on the establishment and very rapidly become the embodiment of that same establishment(and most of the time act worse than those they criticized before).
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  #4  
Unread 04-02-2012, 09:21 PM
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Jean Paulo Jean Paulo is offline
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He also seem to promote high carb diets lately without specifying the context of application to the average population.
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  #5  
Unread 04-03-2012, 10:41 AM
thombrogan thombrogan is offline
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Last I read (which was over a year ago, I think), his carb recommendations were relative to the activity level of his clients and readers. Won't be the first time I was wrong this hour, of course.
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  #6  
Unread 04-03-2012, 07:27 PM
Aussieguy Aussieguy is offline
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Glad someone brought this up. I like Colpo and got his book just after he wrote it. I really like some of the humour in what he writes. Yes, the new version still recommends carbs based on activity.

But this wholegrain thing he's writing about lately....I emailed him a couple quick questions with no reply, and you can't interact on his blog.

So, here are my questions:

Anthony bags out wholegrains as offering nothing. My reading says wholegrains are rich sources of vitamins, minerals, dietary fiber, lignans, b-glucan, inulin, numerous phytochemicals, phytosterols,phytin, and sphingolipids. I haven't read up on what half of those are yet, but they sound good.

They seem potent in the anti-oxidant area:
Miller et al. reported the antioxidant capacity of whole grain breakfast cereals to range from 2200 to 3500 Trolox equivalents (TE). In comparison, antioxidant capacity of fruits generally ranged from 600 to 1700 TE, with a high of 2200 TE for red plums and 3600 TE for berries, and vegetables averaged 450 TE, with a high of 1400 TE for red cabbage. A 41-g average serving of ready-to-eat whole grain breakfast cereal had an antioxidant capacity of 1120 TE compared with 380 and 1020 TE in an average 85-g serving of vegetables and fruits, respectively.

Also, he claims there is nothing offered in wholegrains that you can't find elsewhere. Not true. Now I'm posting this, I can't find it(!) But I found some phytonutrient or something that only wholegrains have.

Anthony freaked me out by talking about the bad "anti-nutrients" of wholegrains. I thought, "crap, I don't want to eat an anti-nutrient!"
And then I look them up:
Antinutrients such as phytic acid, tannins, and enzyme inhibitors are also present in whole grains and [b]may contribute to their overall protective effects[/B. Phytic acid forms chelates with various metals suppressing iron-catalyzed redox reactions and associated oxidative damage. Likewise, phytic acid can suppress the oxidant damage associated with the oxygen radicals produced by the colonic bacteria, thereby protecting the intestinal epithelium. Protease inhibitors, phytic acid, phenolic acids, and saponins present in whole grain have also been suggested to lower the risk of certain cancers, such as colon cancer and breast cancer. Phytic acid, lectins, phenolic acids, amylase inhibitors, and saponins have also been shown to lower plasma glucose, insulin, and/or plasma cholesterol and TG levels.
Sounds good to me!

Anyway, the more I read about wholegrains, the more I think they're good for health, not bad!
Plus.....and for me this is what makes it good news.........
There is nothing better than a sandwich for lunch. Nothing. Eating "body builder" lunches depresses me. Chicken breast & spinach vs real bread and lots of goodness between. The sum is always greater than the parts when it comes to a good sanga.

On top of all that, I don't care what anyone's understanding of "paleo" diets is, wholegrains have been an extremely important part of various cultures diets for thousands of years.
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  #7  
Unread 04-03-2012, 07:56 PM
counterpuncher counterpuncher is offline
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Whole grains are a part of my diet, along with vegetables, fruit, lean protein and some fats. I usually eat whole grains after my workouts as part of my post workout meals, along with some vegetables and lean protein.
When I workout in the morning, I follow it with protein powder mixed into some oatmeal, and a piece of fruit.
I think that too much of anything isn't good, but you can't go wrong by including some of everything.
The only things that I avoid are processed sugar-loaded garbage foods, alcohol and fatty meats, especially those with nitrates.
I like whole grains, and will continue to eat them, no matter what some so called expert might say.
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  #8  
Unread 04-03-2012, 09:03 PM
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Jean Paulo Jean Paulo is offline
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If any of you guys have a subscription to Alan's AARR, Alan wrote a detailed research review about whole grains, inflammation and these so-called anti-nutrients. I just couldn't remember which issue was it in. I hope he can chime in in this thread.
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  #9  
Unread 04-04-2012, 09:39 AM
hugh hugh is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean Paulo View Post
If any of you guys have a subscription to Alan's AARR, Alan wrote a detailed research review about whole grains, inflammation and these so-called anti-nutrients. I just couldn't remember which issue was it in. I hope he can chime in in this thread.
He has an index page for his Research Review - it's in the October 2011 issue, which just came out last week (that's a joke, those who subscribe probably get it). He devotes many pages to the various claims and comes to a very reasonable conclusion, namely that there are good and bad aspects to grains that on the whole balance each other out.

For a measly 10 dollars a month, his research review is a worthwhile investment.
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  #10  
Unread 04-05-2012, 09:48 AM
abdii abdii is offline
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While colpo says most people are better off without grains he also says some people work well with them. He just believe many people are better off with out grains.

I for one can't tolerate many grains(gluten). I get stomach pains and gas after eating gluten heavy meals.

Now I just use rice and corn flour instead of gluten flours and it does make a difference how I feel after these meals.
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