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  #1  
Unread 04-12-2014, 01:31 PM
Griff7628 Griff7628 is offline
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Default Strength and Power Training simultaneously?

Ok so ex-world welterweight UFC champion, George St Pierre used to train a protocol that combined a 3 rep power/absolute strength lift immediately followed by 10 rep plyometric movement that worked the same muscle group. What is this style of training, is it effective? I thought the best way to train explosive power is to build a good absolute strength base for 6 to 8 weeks then switch to plyometrics 4 weeks out from fight?
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Unread 04-12-2014, 01:56 PM
Donald Lee Donald Lee is offline
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Look up post-activation potentiation.
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Unread 04-12-2014, 02:29 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Also look up complex training.

This approach can be used by highly trained athletes. The heavy set, as Donald mentioned, potentiates the power set.

By potentiate I mean that it tends to be more explosive (higher jumps, etc) after the heavy set.

But again, really for highly trained athletes (and it woul be more common to take some break between the heavy and power sets)
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Unread 04-12-2014, 08:27 PM
penobscot penobscot is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lylemcd View Post
Also look up complex training.

This approach can be used by highly trained athletes. The heavy set, as Donald mentioned, potentiates the power set.

By potentiate I mean that it tends to be more explosive (higher jumps, etc) after the heavy set.

But again, really for highly trained athletes (and it woul be more common to take some break between the heavy and power sets)
Just curious as to how it does this (what's going on in the muscles?).
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Unread 04-12-2014, 08:41 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Effect is most likely neural.
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Unread 04-12-2014, 10:27 PM
Griff7628 Griff7628 is offline
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Thanks. Interesting stuff. Good for advanced fighters/athletes it seems. Maybe as a plateau buster even.
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Unread 04-14-2014, 12:00 PM
farrenator farrenator is offline
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I have had great success using this technique for power cleans. I'll warm up with some light sets of power cleans to get the movement pattern down, then switch up to very low rep heavy deadlifts (singles, doubles) and then into heavy power cleans. The heavy power cleans 'feel' lighter after the heavy deadlifts. The key is to not do so much of the heavy deadlifts that it tires me out for the powercleans.

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Originally Posted by Griff7628 View Post
Thanks. Interesting stuff. Good for advanced fighters/athletes it seems. Maybe as a plateau buster even.
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Unread 04-14-2014, 12:08 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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Originally Posted by farrenator View Post
I have had great success using this technique for power cleans. I'll warm up with some light sets of power cleans to get the movement pattern down, then switch up to very low rep heavy deadlifts (singles, doubles) and then into heavy power cleans. The heavy power cleans 'feel' lighter after the heavy deadlifts. The key is to not do so much of the heavy deadlifts that it tires me out for the powercleans.
That last sentence really is the key. The heavy work should be heavy but not exhausting. Otherwise any benefit to potentiation will be more than outweighed by the increase in fatigue.
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Unread 04-14-2014, 12:50 PM
Griff7628 Griff7628 is offline
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Was having a read about it, and you're right, it will work much better for highly trained individuals, but also muscle fiber type is important. So type 2 people will see the most benefit, provided the explosive weight is light enough to move fast otherwise it can actually be detrimental. The cool thing is, it seems theres a few different ways to utilize this way of training.
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Unread 04-14-2014, 01:06 PM
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lylemcd lylemcd is offline
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While a tad tautological, you don't generally get to be elite in sports requiring explosiveness without being fairly Type II fiber dominant. So sort of by definition those are the athletes this training is most suited for.

Generally heavy work is followed by plyo work which, by definition, is low load (bodyweight). Improves speed-strength.

OL'ers would be working heavier than that but their sport is also different more strength-speed (working with a higher percentage of maximum). Years ago I did something similar with a trainee to what was described above.

She'd invariably freak out when the bar 'felt' heavy closer to max (and contradictorily not pull as hard) so I'd have her do one or two heavyish triples with a DL or RDL to feel a heavy weight in her hands. By comparison the clean felt light. I also gave her 2-3 minutes between the heavy set and the explosive work.
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