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  #1  
Unread 06-02-2009, 03:50 PM
Scott Kane Scott Kane is offline
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Default Morning temp range 97.4-98.7F - acceptable/expected?

So following UD2 protocols is a nearly 1.5 degree swing standard between low cal/carb days and carb ups? Would it be better to increase calories a bit on low cal/carb days to increase metabolism a bit? I guess I'm trying to figure out the correlation between body temp and calorie expenditure, such as if morning temp drops x degrees, then this corresponds to a y decrease in caloric expenditure.

To expand on this:

At 98.6F (assuming normal value)-----my maint calories would be 14-16 x BW
At 98.1F (0.5 degree drop)-----------my maint calories would be ? x BW
At 97.6F (1.0 degree drop)-----------my maint calories would be ? x BW
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Unread 06-02-2009, 04:22 PM
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A 'normal' morning temperature is considered 97.8-98.2. That is consistent with 100% normal metabolic rate.

For every half degree below that, you can assume about a 5% reduction in BMR or so.
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Unread 06-02-2009, 04:38 PM
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When do you measure for the reading?

I measure it when my alarm goes off each morning, but all it really seems to help show me is whether I work up entirely due to the alarm (cold, usually around 96) or on my own (warmer, varies, but always higher than 96).

Is there a way to remove that from the equation?

Both readings are done prior to actually getting out of bed.
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Unread 06-02-2009, 04:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lylemcd View Post
A 'normal' morning temperature is considered 97.8-98.2.
Is that taken axillary, oral, or...you know, like a man? A man in prison.
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Unread 06-02-2009, 04:47 PM
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Am J Physiol. 1992 Oct;263(4 Pt 1):E730-4. Links
Concomitant interindividual variation in body temperature and metabolic rate.

Rising R, Keys A, Ravussin E, Bogardus C.
Clinical Diabetes and Nutrition Section, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Phoenix, Arizona 85016.
There is significant variation in metabolic rate in humans, independent of differences in body size, body composition, age, and gender. Although it has been generally held that the normal human "set-point" body temperature is 37 degrees C, these interindividual variations in metabolic rate also suggest possible variations in body temperature. To examine the possibility of correlations between metabolic rate and body temperature, triplicate measurements of oral temperatures were made before and after measurement of 24-h energy expenditure in a respiratory chamber in 23 Pima Indian men. Fasting oral temperatures varied more between individuals than can be attributed to methodological errors or intraindividual variation. Oral temperatures correlated with sleeping (r = 0.80, P < 0.0001), and 24-h (r = 0.48, P < 0.02) metabolic rates adjusted for differences in body size, body composition, and age. Similarly, in the 32 Caucasian men of the Minnesota Semi-Starvation Study, oral temperature correlated with adjusted metabolic rate, and the interindividual differences in body temperature were maintained throughout semistarvation and refeeding. These results suggest that a low body temperature and a low metabolic rate might be two signs of an obesity-prone syndrome in humans.
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  #6  
Unread 06-02-2009, 11:04 PM
Scott Kane Scott Kane is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jigglypuffs View Post
When do you measure for the reading?

I measure it when my alarm goes off each morning, but all it really seems to help show me is whether I work up entirely due to the alarm (cold, usually around 96) or on my own (warmer, varies, but always higher than 96).

Is there a way to remove that from the equation?

Both readings are done prior to actually getting out of bed.
Temp and pulse are taken usually before alarm goes off, before rising from bed. Temp is taken orally...sorry to disappoint
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  #7  
Unread 06-02-2009, 11:32 PM
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pulse can be skewed if waken by an alarm.
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  #8  
Unread 06-03-2009, 07:44 AM
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I used to get around the pulse issue by wearing a HRM 24/7 which logged it all, and then I could track it while asleep/waking/etc based on time and not worry about the alarm.
The main issue there was keeping the conductivity on the sensors all day.

Don't think I am going to resort to wearing a wireless thermometer anally 24/7 for something like this (given that the ones you remotely monitor that I know of go up the I need to read the rules post.I need to read the rules post.I need to read the rules post., since you can't use an oral one 24/7 and the external ones are full of error).

Me waking up without an alarm is highly unlikely most of the time.

Fortunately I don't really care that much either, other than the nerdling factor.
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  #9  
Unread 06-23-2009, 08:19 AM
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How low do people usually let their temperature drop below normal before they decide to stop the diet and eat back at maintenance again?

Today mine was at 97.2, and my norm is 98.5 upon wakeup. It's been down below the typical 98.5 lately, but dropped in larger amounts over the last few days. Im guessing maybe my refeed this past friday wasn't good enough to reset my body, or the exercise afterwards ruined it or something. Not sure.

I don't feel cold or tired or anything, aside from the thermometer's readings(used both the digital and mercury to make sure) I wouldn't have known anything was amiss.

I wake up naturally, I rarely use an alarm. Had a decent night of sleep, I'm midweek on my third week of RFL as a category 2 if that matters.

Have to say I was a bit shocked to see that reading, it's been more in the upper 97's or low 98's typically.

Another side note, GoWear isnt showing any slowdown if that matters. I'm taking 2 servings of 25mg/200mg EC per day too, so maybe that is covering some of the slowdown.

Took it again around noon, and it was back up to 98.6 by then. Slowly increased in the morning until getting there though.

Last edited by Anti : 06-23-2009 at 06:21 PM.
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